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OT --- Air Compressor : Need Recommendation

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by GordonWood421, Jan 20, 2008.

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  1. GordonWood421

    GordonWood421 TS Member

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    I would appreciate recommendations/comments on a good air compressor for home use . I looked at Craftsman and at those sold by Home Depot and Lowe's . Does anyone have any favorable experience with others ? Is a 160 psig rig worth any cost over a 150 psig one ?

    Any experience shared will be appreciated . If e-mail is preferable , please drop the "AC."

    Charlie
     
  2. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    With the name "Gordon Wood" I'd think you would get a great deal. Gordon Wood is the name of a big welding supply distributer here in So-Cal. If this is for nail guns etc., consider the Hitachi.
     
  3. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I have a compressor I use for light gun repair, lawn mower blade sharpening, tire inflation, and whatever. It is 110 psi. If I put a grinder on it, I have to hit it a little and let the the compressor recover. I have had it for over 25 years. It is on its second motor, and I change oil in the compressor annually and clean the filter regularly.

    What is the most demanding thing you are going to do with it? A grinder or air tool really sucks air. If you are going to use an impact wrench or a grinder quite a bit, you need a BIG compressor. If not, a small one with a ten gallon tank will work pretty well. A $200 rig with wheels will be all most folks need.

    A bigger hose helps for light air tool usage. The longer (50') the better.
     
  4. Texas Ton

    Texas Ton TS Member

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    Charlie, for just general household use, I like the pancakes like above. Not terribly loud, light use with an impact is sure possible, a bit lacking for a serious die grinder though.
     
  5. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    I have had a 33 gallon, 220 volt motor Sears Craftsman unit for almost 20 years and it has been flawless. I run it at 120 PSI. The kicker is it IS almost 20 years old. I don't know who's building theirs now but the Craftsman guarantee....
     
  6. BPSR

    BPSR Member

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    All depends on what you plan on running off of your compressor. Personally I wouldn't own any small compressor that is direct drive, to me they are way to noisy. I've got a little 30 gal. upright that is belt driven, it will do most anything I want around the house/garage. If you are running air grinders, or die grinders, you will definately need a compressor that pumps more air than a pancake compressor. Same for even small sandblasters they hog a lot of air. For nailers, or impact guns, most small compressors will work ok. You actually need to look at the CFM's on the compressor, then check the CFM needs of the tools you want to use, then you can make a better decision on what size you need.
     
  7. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

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    what bpsr said. the cfm at pressure are most important. look for something over 8 cfm at 150lbs. think about what you think you need and then get the next size bigger

    good luck bob
     
  8. trpshtr2001

    trpshtr2001 TS Member

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    If you are going to be using air tools , check to see what their CFM requirements are, then buy one at least that big or bigger. This way you won't have to wait for your compressor to catch up with the usage. Most all air powered tools have their minimum air requirements listed on a tag attached to them or in advertisements for that tool.
     
  9. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Specifically, there will be no effective difference between 150 and 160 PSI maximum compressors.

    Neil
     
  10. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    Maximum psi is not nearly as important as CFM/CFH. Rarely will you need more than 100psi.
    I have a 30gal unit rated at 140psi/7.1cfm. It is NOT enough flow to support a pneumatic die grinder or angle grinder, or an air drill if used for big holes in thick metal.
    I'd like to have twice that flow rate. It's a Campbell-Hausefeld and has been a reliable unit (9 years old), works great for 90% of my needs...just not a large enough pump for heavy-duty stuff.
    The best compressor for you depends on what you want it to do.
     
  11. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    I needed a compressor and found one at the garage I take my car to. All it needed was a motor and its been a good compressor. Its a 1968 Champion. Two stage 80 gal tank. I got it for $125.00 and I had a motor sitting in the barn. I changed the oil and let it drain over night and then flushed it put new oil, ran it for 15 min then flushed it again then put new oil in it. The Craftman tools are not what they use to be. To me they are junk and the Lowe's is not much better. Resale they are trash. Go find a place that deals in air tools and supples. They might have a used one in your price range or a new one for that matter. We had a place here where I live and they sold lifts, tools, compressors and all the parts you needed. The father fell ill and the son took it over and it went under. I was pissed because I to need to find another place. Spend the money and get a good name branned. It will pay for itself in the long run.
     
  12. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    If you are using tools,sand blasting or painting cars you would wouldn't be asking this question. You would buy the biggest two stage you could afford. So, if you are just going to air up tires, use a nail gun and that kind of thing a portable pancake type is a good way to go. They're small, quiet, and build pressure fast. Keep the valve open and the tank drained when not in use, they rust from the inside out.
     
  13. XT Bill

    XT Bill TS Member

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    Are you going to run this on 110 volts, or 220 ?

    At least 10 cfm would be nice, but if the motor won't start against the pressure in the tank, all the CFM in the world isn't going to do you any good.

    Mine has a dual voltage motor, so I ran a 220 (240) line to it, switched the wires in the motor as shown on the name plate, and it's been starting like a champ ever since. I'll bet it's been 20 years.

    I think you'll find the Sears Crapsman warranty does NOT apply to power tools like this !
     
  14. magnumshot

    magnumshot Active Member

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    2hp 230v 30gal sears works for me as a tire filler and air blower. Never bought the air tools, as most electric tools I have do the same. Compressor is bulky for my cramped back room, and only plugs to one outlet I set up. Probably would be happier with a smaller tank and 115v. If I had a decent garage or shop, I would set up to paint and want a larger tank. Mine was a freebee, so I can't complain.
     
  15. steele

    steele TS Member

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    Don't worry about the PSI rating. Most industrial tools are designed to operate in the 85-100 PSI range. You are going to have to decide what you need it for. Rule of thumb, what ever tool you have that uses the most air (CFM), go 50% larger in compressor size. That way you will always have enough. Sandblasting & grinding use up lots of air. 2 stage pumps make air faster also. It all comes down to what you wnat to do with it.
     
  16. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I have a 5hp Sears. Bought in 1990. The only thing I've changed is the oil and filter, and one fitting. I read somewhere that Sears sell 80% of home compressors. I can understand why. Sears has a great parts department. Everything I ever needed for my many Sears items that needed a part, Sears had. Try that with Home Depoe or Lowes. You will be lucky to ever get a part.
     
  17. alpine

    alpine TS Member

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    CFM is more important than PSI. Personally I would not have anything smaller than a two stage, two cylinder compressor. Mine is 175 psi (at 17 cfm)regulated down to 100 psi (most air tools only need 100 psi). But I can run anything I own without waiting for the compressor to catch up.
     
  18. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Just used my old Sears 220V setup Saturday to blow the dust out of my computer. Couldn't believe how dirty it was. Surprised it hadn't been overheating from trying to answer all the threads on here.
     
  19. Pull Bang

    Pull Bang Member

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    I have a Craftsman, 115V, 2HP & 15 gallon tank. I have the unit in the basement and use it at my work bench. I like it, provides plenty of air and pressure.


    Problem! It is very noisy and can be heard throughout the house. If I forget to turn it off and disconnect the air line, it can come on anytime.


    This happened one time in the middle of the night. Needless to say, Wifey was up set and thats an understatement!!!

    Good Luck


    Frank
     
  20. GordonWood421

    GordonWood421 TS Member

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    Thanks for all the comments and for the link . I won't be needing a lot of air but , I can't take the pounding from driving nails any more so I need enough to drive a nail gun a little sometimes . If I get a decent compressor , maybe I can receive a tool or two for Christmas and birthdays .

    I'm leaning toward a Craftsman but need to check air demands against deliverability as recommended .

    Thanks again ,
    Charlie
     
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