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Opinions of the Remington Ultra Magnum family

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 7remmag, Aug 23, 2011.

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  1. 7remmag

    7remmag Member

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    I have been given the opportunity to obtain a Remington Model 700 for a very reasonable price. The idea of a non-belted magnum cartridge excites me so I was wandering what people's experiences with the Ultra Magnums were? I have heard both good and bad things about the cartridges and I would like some solid facts. I would also like some opinions on the rifles I'm choosing between which would be the CDL; the Sendero SF II; or the XCR II. All of these models are available in at least one of the Ultra Magnum calibers. Thanks for the responses.

    Kyle
     
  2. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Keeps gun writers busy.
     
  3. grl

    grl Member

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    I shoot a 300 ultra mag (Savage) for elk. It's loud, it kicks, it sends 200 grs at 3,000 fps+
    It's not for plinking. That said, it's effective.
     
  4. scoutmaster

    scoutmaster Member

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    The Remington 300 ultra mag is the only caliber that still has a following. The 7mm ultra mag offered only 150 fps to 200 fps per second advantage over the 7mm Rem mag. You would have to be shooting past 600 yards to see the advantage of the extra speed.

    Of the new "Beltless" magnums offered by Remington and Winchester the 300 WSM
    is still showing sales support among american rilfe buyers.

    Scoutmaster
     
  5. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    The FIL, two other fellows and myself were elk hunting a few years ago. I had a chance to shoot a Remington .338 Ultra Mag with 225 grain bullets.

    I shot 3 rounds and checked zero for the guy who for some reason didn't feel confident shooting it. LOL...

    Anyways, my 1980's plain old model 70 in .338 Win mag shooting 225 grain bullets did have less felt recoil, but not by much... However the cost difference was and is significant for factory ammo between the two cartridges.

    If you are a reloader, of course that will help, but it brings us back to the point of what does the Ultramag round REALLY give a guy?

    IMO, if you want the rifle and it is better than fair in price, and the additional cost of factory ammunition to include less of a selection of factory ammo does not bother you, then buy it, shoot it, and love it.

    Just don't get into the mindset that this is a 'super' round or you will be disappointed.

    My buddy, he consequently did kill a bull, but missed multiple times because he had no confidence in his setup and was IMO afraid of the recoil.

    Me, I don't have to worry much about recoil as 3 seasons/ elk later, I only have 3 shots down range... LOL, a fact I love to rub in with him.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I own Model 700s in 7mmRUM, .300RUM, .300SAUM and .338RUM. I also own a Model 700 in 7mmSTW and formerly owned one in 7mmRM. Case life with the two belted rounds is/was short - two or three loadings - while the non-belted cases exhibit very little stretching and so far, I haven't seen one "ring of death" on any of them. I honestly haven't fired the .338 yet; I bought it because a local dealer had a new one in the discontinued LSS model and I thought my son might one day get some use out of it. I bought the .300SAUM because it was discontinued, too.

    With only the pressure tabs removed from the forend of its laminated thumbhole stock, the .300RUM puts three Federal 165-grain factory loads into 1.5" at 3,414fps. For factory loads, I can live with that and while I have dies for it, I haven't bothered loading for it as it is another rifle that I probably will never hunt with.

    The .300SAUM puts three Berger 155-grain VLDs into right around a half-inch at 3,182fps. It's a really nice cartridge to shoot considering its bullet weight and velocity and due to its Ackley Improved-like shoulder angle, case stretch is almost non-existent with it, too.

    The 7mmRUM is the real standout. Under half-inch groups from either 140 or 150-grain Noslers at 3,328 and 3,288fps, respectfully. And that's from a bone-stock BDL with a wood stock! My 7mmRM was never anywhere close to that accurate and I swear it kicked harder, too. The 7mmSTW has a factory muzzle break, so it shoots softer than a .270WIN but it struggles to get to one-inch groups with consistency.

    I think the RUM family is great for the hunter who wants or needs the most out of a given bore diameter. I'm probably going to buy a 7mmSAUM and .375RUM just to complete the collection and wish Remington would develop a 6.5RUM.

    Ed
     
  7. ClaySmoke

    ClaySmoke Member

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    I, like Ed, have most of the RUM offerings, including the 7mm RUM, 300 RUM, and the 338 RUM. I find these cartridges to be ideal when flat trajectory and kinetic energy are needed. I agree with Ed, in the fact that the 7mm RUM is the standout of the group. While this cartridge did not garner the attention of the 300 RUM, for the reloader looking to maximize this cartridges effectiveness, it can't be beat. While I have shot this cartridge alot with the 140 gr class of bullets, the real pinnacle of it's performance comes with the use of the heavier 168 gr and especially the 180 gr VLD bullets. For long range hunting and shooting, this combo is tough to beat unless you get into the big 338's such as the 338 Lapua Magnum or the 338 Edge (which is based on the 338 RUM cartridge). I have found that these cartridges fed with a diet of factory loadings do not do them justice. I would reserve these rounds more for the reloader that is looking to maximize the performance from each bullet diameter group; i.e.-7mm, 308, 338, etc. Just as an example of the effectiveness of the 7mm RUM; in 2008 I harvested five animals with this round including 1 mule deer, 2 whitetails, 1 pronghorn antelope and 1 coyote at an average distance between 225 and 250 yards, and none of them took a step after being shot. Works for me!! Garrett
     
  8. 7remmag

    7remmag Member

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    I will not be purchasing a new rifle until December so I have quite a bit of time to decide, this was just an idea I had that I needed some opinions on. My gunsmith told me to stay away from the Ultra Magnums because they haven't been around long enough and only Remington produces brass so if they decide that they are not selling enough it could go the way of the 17 Remington and the dodo. I have thought about a 300 Winchester Magnum, but it doesn't have enough benefit over my 7mm Remington Magnum for me to buy a rifle in that caliber. I'll take any input on that too. Right now I have two rifles that essentially cover all bases in North America so I'm looking for something bigger than a 7mm or smaller that a 257.

    Kyle
     
  9. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    You have every gun you'll ever need right there in your sign on, Kyle.

    7mm Rem Mag.

    Been shooting one since i was 14, and when I do my part, it does its part. I had my .300 Win Mag rebarreled into a second 7mm Mag. I'm not particularly recoil sensitive, but I could NEVER make a .300 shoot - and i had two, a remington and a winchester, and neither ever did it for me. My 7mm groups under an inch (when I do my part)

    someone above noted you have to be shooting past 600 yards to see the advantage. Not many of us (me included) CAN or NEED to shoot that far. I'm pretty comfortable out to 400, in the proper conditions.
     
  10. larryjk

    larryjk Member

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    My son has both the 300 RUM and the 338 RUM. The 300 is a very good shooter and has the same velocity as the 30/378 WBY, but with about 14 grains less powder. This is with equal length barrels. Yes, the law of dimishing return does work. The 300 is really its best with the 200 gr. bullet but is touted with the 180 gr. at almost 3200 fps. The 338 RUM is on the original Remington 700 and is a punishing experience at best off the bench. This is not a rifle to be shot unless you are used to recoil. I have weighted and balanced the rifle so that it now weighs 9 1/4 pounds and it is highly tolerable off the bench. It is extremely accurate with the factory 250 gr. load. My son and I shot some prairie dogs with it two years ago until I remembered that msrp is about $80 per box of 20 rounds. We were killing dogs at about 250 yds., with few misses. The rifle is ready to go elk hunting.
     
  11. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    My experience with the 300 RUM is very limited but it was enough to leave no doubt in my mind that this was not the shell for me. Way too much recoil! I suppose it might be manageble in a very heavy rifle with a muzzle brake - but then who want to pack all that junk?

    My current 'big' rifle is chambered for the 300 WSM. This round iss quite a bit easier to handle in a sporter weight package and it has all the power necessary to take big game like elk at any reasonable distance.
     
  12. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I agree that "magnumitis" is unnecessary. But they're available and buying guns is an incurable disease, so...

    For the big game hunting I do in Pennsylvania, my favorite standard caliber is the .25-06 but my overall #1 choice is my .280 Ackley Improved. It puts 140-grain VLDs into less than a half-inch at 3,100fps and is surprisingly easy on the shoulder. With it being right on the doorstep of the 7mmRM's ballistics, I expected the sharp recoil of my old rifle in that caliber, but the .280AI for some reason is actually enjoyable to shoot off a bench. And when the bullets punch little cloverleafs on the targets, shooting it is fun, too!

    Ed
     
  13. grl

    grl Member

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    I replied earlier, but I gotta tell you, of all my hunting rifles, my go to gun is a 30-06. I hand load 180 gr and feel real confident out to 250-300 yds. Any longer and the gun is more accurate than I am. In addition, if need be, any place that sells ammo will have some. It's light enough to carry all day, and a well placed 30 cal will take down anything in North America. (Well, a P.O.'d grizz might take exception, but I really don't want to find out.) I have ballistics out to 500 yds taped to the stock of my ultra mag, but I don't see myself taking a shot that long. P dogs might be one thing, but but for deer, elk, etc, get close. It's a lot more fun.....
     
  14. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    When we used to hunt deer in beanfields a few of our hunting club members bought 300RUMs ...to be truthful the extra cost and kick just didn't justify it over a plain old 300 WinMag ..I got the same useful range they did by sighting an extra .75" at 100yds and that was comparing factory to factory loads...with handloads in both calibers the WinMag always outshot any of the best loads in the RUMS...not impressed...a plain 7mmRemMag is all you need up to Elk...Ive gotten rid of all my mags except my 338 and my old 350RemMag Model 600
     
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