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Opinion english vs pistol stock hunting gun

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by cementman, May 11, 2008.

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  1. cementman

    cementman Member

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    Considering purchase of a 28ga side by side to be used for upland hunting and a round of sporting clays here and there. There is gun with a straight english stock that I'm looking at but always shot guns with pistol grips. Would appreciate any comments on the pro's and con's of either stock.
     
  2. Fast Oil

    Fast Oil TS Member

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    Is it double or single trigger? English stock with double trigger, easier to make the move to back trigger. If single trigger, go with what feels comfortable and natural for you.

    Scott
     
  3. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    I like the straight stock for the field on my O/U's but my target guns are Pistol grip
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The straight grip typical of English guns is related to the style of shooting promoted by the English gentry. They strongly recommend that the shooters cheek just very gently touch the comb. That is why English guns usually have a very narrow comb that would be very uncomfortable to shoot with much cheek pressure. I spent half a day on an English range getting a nice H&H fitted to me the English way. I ended up with a beautiful gun that was torture to shoot the way we shoot. The stock man was very clear when he told me that he will make the stock to allow me to shoot the way I should shoot, not the way I did shoot. He also was very clear when he stated that nobody in America knew how to make a proper stock and any stock made with a recoil pad should be trashed.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    I think you'll have a hard time separating fact from fashion when discussing grip configurations. I certainly think the straight grips look sleek. and the overwhelming majority of people will think that's the way a bird gun should look. Read a bit and you'll see that a lot of the noted scribes yammer on about how a straight grip keeps your hands in a line and helps point the gun, but I doubt any of them were very good at high school physics. As far as an opinon, I've got both, shoot both, and probably shoot either style as well as the other, but I always feel I have better control of a gun with a pistol grip.
     
  6. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    pistol grip!!
     
  7. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    I got to thinking about what Pat said above. I haven't brushed up against any card-carrying British shooters, but what he said about light cheek pressure reminded me of "the throw."

    From about 1940 to maybe the early 1970s the American Rifleman was an outstanding magazine - covered everything, even the Grand American, if you can believe it. Anyway, over the decades there were perhaps three or four articles that talked about "the throw" in the context of field shooting. It never made too much sense to me, as it sounded like nothing more than pulling the trigger the instant the butt hits the shoulder. Then I read Askins' 1910 "American Shotgun," wherein he described what amounted to firing the shotgun quickly, just pointing the shotgun, not unlike one would a pistol in a firefight. No sights, really, and you don't need cheek pressure. So maybe the whole thing of the straight grip has its origins in an instinctive point-and-shoot style as opposed to our nowadays more familiar cheek-weld and eyes-and-beads-to-the-front kind of shooting.
     
  8. superxjeff

    superxjeff Well-Known Member

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    Bob B rister covers this topic in depth in his book. He talks about how many of the live bird shoters use them and think they are a shade faster and more controlable. My view? Tradition be damned! Shoot what you shoot best. I have several guns with english stocks and I shoot them quite well but I can't say that I shoot them any better then anything else I own. I like the look of them on a double or an automatic but other then that I can't see any reason to own one or not own one other then resale value. Jeff
     
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