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Only of interest about Large Double Rifles

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by mxsst, Jan 4, 2017.

  1. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    The eternal allure of the double rifle
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    Following a visit to Westley Richards' premises in Birmingham, Marcus Janssen is left wondering whether it is the heritage, design or craftsmanship that makes the English double rifle so alluring.


    There was an unmistakable glint in Anthony ‘Trigger' Alborough-Tregear's eye as he turned the handle of the big, heavy vault door with both hands. “This will blow your socks off,” he said as he switched on the light. It took me a while to register what I was looking at, and even now I can't quite believe it.

    My guided tour of Westley Richards' premises in Birmingham was coming to an end.

    Like a wild- and wide-eyed Charlie with his golden ticket, I had been granted entry into the inner sanctum of a hallowed world and it was all happening too quickly. Desperately, I tried to capture every last detail – the achingly beautiful guns and rifles, the moth-eaten African trophies, the memorabilia, the sepia photographs, the ivory, the order books, the leather-bound journals, the cartridge collections, the smell of walnut impregnated with linseed oil, dust, sweat and a thousand stories from an era the likes of which the world will never see again.

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    It was almost too much to take for a boy born in Africa and brought-up on the adventures of Cornwallis Harris, Gordon Cumming, Selous, Bell and Sutherland. I kept on thinking about my brother and all the times that we lay awake in our camp beds on safari, wishing it was 1811 and that we too were heading north with William Burchell into the unmapped, unknown Dark Continent for a sojourn of indeterminable duration and unimaginable wonder.

    “Here, what do you think of this?” said Trigger, as he carefully removed an old thorn and weather beaten Westley Richards double from its well travelled canvas case. Surrounding it was the most remarkable collection of double rifles and shotguns, both old and new, imaginable.

    As I raised the heavy .577 Nitro Express to my shoulder, I just knew that this was no show pony – this was a tool commissioned by someone who intended to use it. Turns out I was right. Turns out that someone was legendary elephant hunter James Sutherland who – along with Karamojo Bell and Arthur Neumann – was one of the last of a rare breed of professional ivory hunters who pushed back the final frontiers of colonial Africa. Sutherland famously killed 447 bull elephants, and most were taken with this very .577, as described in his book The Adventures of an Elephant Hunter. I ran my fingers along its dark, gnarled stock and tried to imagine some of the places it had been, some of the sights it had seen.

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    The magic and mystique encapsulated in a best English double rifle is hard to put into words. Yes, they unquestionably represent the pinnacle of the British gunmaker's art – an icon of the British Empire at its zenith – but to someone whose first love was that of Africa's wide open spaces and azure skies, their significance runs deeper than that. Few objects represent the height of African exploration, adventure and discovery like the British double rifle. Almost every legendary African hunter and explorer from Baker, Cotton Oswell and Baldwin, to Cuninghame, Hunter and Percival all carried doubles from the great British makers, the likes of Westley Richards, John Rigby & Co, George Gibbs and Holland & Holland.

    The English double rifle as we know it today was the product of the demands of the intrepid explorers of the day, first in India and then in Africa. Evolved from experience in the big game fields of the colonies, they bore no resemblance to the military weapons of the time. Long-range accuracy was of no concern to hunters of dangerous game; what really mattered was having the security of an immediate second shot if you needed it. Indeed, by as early as the mid-1840s many big game hunters in Africa were using double rifles as the two barrels and two independent lock mechanisms gave them just that – a reliable and immediate back-up shot, adding a degree of safety, relatively speaking, of course, to their sport.

    Initially, the first doubles were smooth-bored, black powder muzzle-loaders (10 bores were the norm, although 4 bores, 6 bores and 8 bores were also produced) but from the mid- to late-1800s, innovations in the gunmaking industry took off and, with the advent of breech-loading firearms and cordite smokeless powder, double rifles in calibres such as the .450 and .577 Nitro Express emerged as the new forerunners for dangerous game.

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    However, the British ban in 1907 of the import of all .450 rifles and ammunition into India and East Africa resulted in a rush by British rifle and ammunition makers to develop their own proprietary big game calibres. Holland & Holland created the .500/465 Nitro Express, Joseph Lang the .470 Nitro Express, the Eley Brothers the .475 No. 2 Nitro Express and Westley Richards the .476 Nitro Express, among many others. And by the time the ban was eventually lifted, these new rounds had established reputations as effective big game killers.

    Even with the availability of cheaper Mauser 98 magazine rifles, the double rifle still remained the preferred choice of professional hunters who knew that you had to get in as close as possible before pulling the trigger. Anyone who has ever been charged by a buffalo, elephant, leopard or lion will tell you that, at such close quarters, you only ever have time for one or two shots. A third simply isn't an option. And the fact that there are practically no records of best English double rifles failing due to a fault of the weapon itself, tells you why they remain popular with hunters and PHs to this day.

    But it was the first three decades following the turn of the century that emerged as the golden age of the double rifle. Although the days of the great explorers and ivory hunters like Burchell, Cornwallis Harris, Gordon-Cumming and Baldwin were largely over, the Scramble for Africa was just beginning and, following the Berlin Conference of 1884, a British colony was established in East Africa for the first time. By 1904, Nairobi, in its infancy, was emerging as the capital of the safari world.

    A new era had begun and, before long, Nairobi-based white hunters such as Alan Black, R. J. Cuninghame, Leslie Tarlton, J. A. Hunter, Bill Judd, Denys Finch Hatton and Philip Percival were etching their names into the annals of East African history as the leading white hunters of their day. And coinciding with the surge in popularity in big game hunting was the development and refinement of sporting rifles. Indeed many would argue that it was during this period that the finest sporting arms the world has ever seen were produced for the likes of Theodore Roosevelt and the Maharajas of Patiala and Alwar.

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    But of course, the Second World War brought it all to an abrupt end and, due to increased labour costs after the war and a shrinking Empire, the production of handcrafted sporting firearms became unsustainable. The days of the double rifle were over forever.

    Or so you might have thought.

    Just as the big game hunting industry in Kenya was coming to an end in the late 1970s, a new-look safari industry was emerging in countries like South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. South Africa in particular, and latterly Namibia, have shown that commercial hunting, in a far more carefully controlled and regulated guise, can play an important role in the management of Africa's wildlife by giving animals a value far greater than that of their meat, providing employment and generating much-needed revenue in areas where photographic tourism may not be viable. Plus the mere presence of safari operators in isolated areas acts as a deterrent to indiscriminate poachers.

    As a result, and driven largely by the US market where an appetite for big game hunting persists and double rifles are justifiably revered as the ultimate tool for the job, orders for English double rifles have remained strong since the 1980s. Westley Richards, for instance, currently have 40 new double rifles on order in big game calibres from .375 H&H to .600 Nitro Express, and Rigby, who have recently relaunched their classic rising bite double rifle, have 21 in production in either .470 or .500 Nitro Express.

    “The majority of our clients who order double rifles are still big game hunters,” says Trigger, “and they intend to use their rifles. Yes, many of them will also be collectors, but they are driven first and foremost by a desire to hunt big game in wildest Africa with a classic Westley Richards double rifle.”

    The simple fact is that even in today's age of CNC and CAD/CAM machining, English double rifles are still handmade by master craftsmen and therefore the traditional qualities of balance, accuracy and reliability are maintained, even if the rifles are both costly and time-consuming to produce. The fact that only a handful of English makers – Westley Richards, Holland & Holland, Purdey, Rigby and Anderson Wheeler – are producing big game doubles, is a reflection of the level of skill and craftsmanship required.

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    Between 500 and 600 man-hours goes into the building of each of our classic droplock doubles,” explains Trigger. “It is a process that simply can not be rushed as each stage must be completed in turn. That has always been the case, and that will never change.” In all, more than 10 highly skilled and specialist craftsmen (action makers, barrel makers, finishers, engravers and stockers) will work on each rifle. But it's not just the building of the rifles that is so time-consuming – each and every one has to be carefully regulated so that the triggers are perfectly crisp, the ejectors sharp and precise, and both barrels shoot to the same point of aim at a given distance (usually 50 yards), a painstaking process that tests even the most experienced and skilled gun makers.

    From order to delivery therefore takes between two and three years for a Westley Richards double, and prices start at £59,500, although if you go for the classic .577 Nitro Express and add a few extras like side plates, an extra set of hand detachable locks, a single selective trigger and exhibition grade wood, you'll be looking at a price tag of about £75,000.

    But where to from here? Are such high standards sustainable? And will the demand last? Or, like the last of the ivory hunters who kept going when the great herds were dwindling, are double rifles an anachronism that belong in the past?

    “Absolutely not,” says Trigger. “In a day and age when almost nothing is built to last, in England a handful of us are still producing rifles of the highest possible standard that will be passed down from one generation to the next. Whilst being totally functional, double rifles are also individual works of art, totally bespoke and built to each individual client's specifications.”

    But let's not forget that although they were invented in the 19th century and perfected in the 20th, they remain, in the 21st century, the most reliable and best tool for the job. Which brings me back to James Sutherland's mighty .577. “You know, after all these years out of service, I wouldn't hesitate to take this rifle back to Mozambique to hunt buffalo,” I said, perhaps a bit too nostalgically. “You just know it wouldn't let you down.”

    That's the thing – they've never been beaten. And in today's day and age, that's saying something.

    Thanks
    Phil
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  2. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Some of the vintage Big Game Hunter's books can be read online as copyright has run out etc.

    The Adventures of a Elephant Hunter by James "Jim" Sutherland, 1st printed 1912

    The adventures of an elephant hunter

    Phil
     
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  3. SecondChance

    SecondChance Active Member

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    Amazing article!!!! Makes one wonder/dream what it would have been like to be back there for only 1 day to experience such adventures. Not to mention the honor/opportunity to be able to handle such majestic works of art and craftsmanship as those rifles would be akin to winning the lottery!!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
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  4. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Jim Corbett's "W J Jeffery's .450/400 3 inch Double Rifle" was part of Elmer Keith's Gun Collection for many years.
    Sold as a part of the Elmer Keith's Gun Collection and made $264.500 at auction.

    Keith's Quote: in April 1967 Gun Notes where Keith talked about his prized gun.
    I own the late Jim Corbett's tiger rifle-the best quality boxlock .450-400(3") double rifle by W.J. Jeffery & Co., with which he killed so many man-eating tigers for the Indian government. He also used it in Africa. The brass-cornered oak and leather case is in fine shape, while the rifle shows more use and less abuse than any old rifle I have ever seen.

    The metal is as bright as a silver dollar. The action is that good No. 2 Jeffery is sound and tight as a rat trap. Engraving shows up even better on the bright steel. Only traces of checkering are left. The stock ears are actually worn away from the frame, as is the butt of the stock from the engraved heel and toe plates.

    The bores are grey in the grooves from cordite, and the lands are worn down about halfway, but there are no pits from neglect.

    With Corbett lying out in tree crotches and machans in the rain waiting for tigers, this rifle was exposed to all kinds of weather. Jim Corbett had no Hoppes No. 9, or Rice's X-10 solvent, but I would bet he poured many gallons of water through these tubes. In spite of external wear, this .450-400 is as effective and accurate a hunting rifle as when turned out by W.J. Jeffery & Co.. I fired both barrels at a six inch bull's eye at 80 yards, shooting from a car window. The bullets(Kynoch 400 grain softnose) landed one inch apart, one directly over the other, both cutting the centerline of the target. Jim sold this rifle to a man from Vancouver, and my friend George Neary got it from him. I swapped a perfect .350 Elliot caliber Danial Frazer double ejector for it.

    I would like to have known Jim Corbett. His book, Man Eaters of Kumoan, is a masterpiece on the Indian tiger and proves he knew more about life and habits, of that beast than any living man. I treasure his old rifle. You can judge a man by the condition of his rifle.
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    Corbett’s nerve-straining hunts.

    Auction Notes about the details of Corbett's W J Jeffery's Double Rifle
    Description: SN 20176. Cal. .450/400 3" Jeffery Cordite. Best Quality cased boxlock ejector double rifle made by W.J. Jeffery and Co. London, ca. 1909. 24" Krupp Gussstahl CHOPPER LUMP bbls, with dolls head extension, proved Cordite 55-400 Max. Bbls with concave engine turned quarter rib, sunken concave engine turned mid-rib and engine turned caterpillar ramp, with gold bead sight. Rear sight with one standing & four folding leaves from 100-500 yards with shallow Vs and platinum center lines. Front swing swivel mount soldered to bottom rib including orig 1" swing swivel. Right bbl engraved "W.J. JEFFERY & Co LTD" and left bbl "13 KING STREET St JAMES'S St". Breeches are engraved with 1/8" border band & dolls head with flowing scroll engraving. The flowing scrollback top lever action has double underbolt & recess for dolls head extension and DOUBLE TRIGGERS. Breech face with disk-set strikers. "NON AUTOMATIC" top tang safety with gold inlaid "SAFE". All action, top lever, trigger guard and grip cap surfaces are covered with bold Best Quality flowing scroll engraving. Left & right action bars are engraved with "WJ JEFFERY & Co Ltd LONDON" in flowing banners. Splinter forend is checkered with fine bordered flat top checkering. Forend iron & tip are engraved in matching flowing scrolls. Full pistol grip buttstock of fine grained relatively plain walnut, with engraved steel grip cap and checkered butt finished with Best Quality scroll, heel and toe plates that are engraved with matching bold scroll. A sling swivel & vacant silver oval are on the toe line. Forearm & buttstock are checkered with orig fine line flat topped multipoint checkering. The rifle is cased in its orig Best Quality beveled edge brass-cornered oak & leather case, and includes a rare & wonderful orig canvas & leather outer case cover. Interior is lined with red baise. Case lid includes the orig W.J. Jeffery trade label. Included in the case are several fired cases & loaded cartridges along with two rounds with rare soft nose split bullets and one round with rare L.T. capped bullet, all well-suited to tiger or leopard shooting. Also included are 3 5-rnd boxes Kynoch soft and 3 5-rnd boxes Kynoch solid Elmer Keith's .450 x 3" ammunition for this rifle. PROVENANCE: The Elmer Keith Estate Collection. Numerous articles by Elmer Keith where this gun was mentioned, and in one he states: "I own the late Jim Corbett's tiger rifle - the best quality, box lock .50-400, 3" double rifle by W. J. Jeffery & Co - with which he killed so many man-eating tigers for the Indian government. He also used it in Africa. Brass cornered oak and leather case is in fine shape. Canvas cover for the case is in bad shape and the rifle shows more use and less abuse than any rifle I have ever seen. The metal is as bright as a silver dollar. The action in that good number 2 Jeffery is sound and tight as a rat trap. Engraving shows up even better on the bright steel. Only traces of the checkering are left. The stock ears are actually worn away from the frame, as is the butt of the stock from the engraved heel and toe plates. The bores are gray in the grooves from cordite and the lands are worn down about half way from the original, but there are no pits from neglect. With Corbett lying out in tree crotches and machans in the rain waiting for tigers, this rifle was exposed to all kinds of weather. Jim Corbett had no Hoppes no. 9 or Rices X-10 solvent, but I would bet he poured many gallons of hot water through these tubes. In spite of external wear, it is as effective and accurate a hunting rifle as when turned out by W. J. Jeffery & Co. I fired both barrels at a 6" bull's eye - at 80 yards- shooting from a car window. They landed 1" apart, one directly over the other, both cutting the center line of the target. Jim sold this rifle to a man in Vancouver and my friend George Neary got it from him. I swapped a perfect .350 Elliot caliber, Daniel Fraser double ejector for it. I would like to have known Jim Corbett. His book "Man Eaters of Kumaon" is a masterpiece on the Indian tiger and proves he knew more on the life and habits of that beast than any living man. I treasure his old rifle. You can judge a man by the condition of his rifle." Copy of letter from Jim Corbett when selling his rifle to a Mr. Davis. Internet info on Jim Corbett's rifles. Factory letter stating that Jeffery records were destroyed in WWII. Other correspondence regarding this rifle and its exhibition at Cabela's in Boise, Idaho. Factory letter, Aug 1, 2012, with specifications for rifle no. 20176, and ledger page with the only note "This rifle belonged to Col. Jim Corbett". "Ref G. Whittome". Most recently the Corbett Rifle was the topic of a fine article in the Spring 2013 edition of the Double Gun Journal. CONDITION: Rifle remains in extraordinary untouched orig condition. While the overall rifle shows evidence of the countless miles & hours it was carried in Jim Corbett's hands, it also demonstrates no abuse and the kind of loving care that Jim Corbett would have lavished on the one thing that regularly stood between him and death by the claws & teeth of man-eating cats. Two patches of light to moderate external pitting about 5" back from each muzzle. Bbl blacking is worn to soft silver patina over most of their exposed surface with most of the orig blacking present under forearm. Sights are mostly soft silver patina on outer exposed surfaces with protected under surfaces & platinum lines with most of their orig blue finish. Receiver & furniture are worn to a soft silver patina with very slight traces of fire blue remaining on action bottom plate & trigger guard bow, and traces of case color where protected by action beads, trigger guard, and top lever. Heel & toe plates are also a similar soft silver. Engraving remains crisp & undamaged, and in a way, is set off and more beautiful without color hardening to conceal it. Significant orig case color remains on the protected forend iron inside forearm. Orig checkering shows considerable wear with a few dents & loss of border in places. Generally filled with old oil, grease and perhaps tiger blood. Wood is considerably below metal at interface with action, and at heel and toe plates. Action is slightly loose, bbls are somewhat off face, trigger pulls are fine & ejectors are in time. Moderate to significant flame cutting to breech faces (much more on the right than left) around the periphery of the rims (no doubt caused by ruptured cases). Bores are bright with some frosting in grooves. Right bbl shows some modest wear & light Cordite burn. Case interior remains in overall good condition with some wear & chafing to baize lining. Orig case label intact with a few small tears. There is a probably recent 3" long splintered impact damage to front bevel & a similar much smaller 1" impact to left bevel. Exterior of case clean & well preserved with a few minor scuffs; orig lid straps present & worn. Outer canvas mail case worn & tattered but still in one piece & functional with two of three straps & all buckles present. 4-47962 RJS134

    Thanks all
    Phil
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
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  5. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Going off topic for a moment anyone who might be interested in jungle adventures and the hunting of big cats should take a look at the life of Sasha Siemel and his exploits with his preferred bow+arrow and spear hunting of jungle cat

    "Tiger-man Sasha Siemel accounted for over 270 jaguars during his career, taken with rifle, bayonet, spear and bow. He came to prefer the combination of bow and spear over the rifle, as the following comments suggest, "It is only logical and natural that I should. The spear is a primitive weapon, so is the bow. While I would not want to say that hunting big cats with a rifle can not be plenty dangerous and exciting under all circumstances, particularly so in our Matto Grosso jungles, where vision is extremely limited, it seems to me that the bow complements the spear. If I now had any use for a shield besides, I should be perfectly equipped."

    In 1936 Sasha would meet Edith Bray. Edith, a mere eighteen years of age, became so impressed with Sasha that she convinced her parents to give her permission to join Sasha in the Matto Gross on a jaguar hunt. Helen Post accompanied her as chaperone and the two women accounted for three jaguars, a mountain lion, marsh deer, tapir and much small game. During this hunt Sasha's pistol would accidently discharge as he fought a jaguar with his spear and inflict a grievous wound to his leg. The two young ladies and some of Sasha's native helpers would require two weeks by packhorse, oxcart and dugout canoe getting him to a hospital, barely beating the deadly gangrene. Edith would make another trip to the Matto Grosso as Sasha's girl photographer and eventually convince Sasha that their 28 years age difference should not be a factor to them getting married in 1940.
    Edith would write and publish her account of their life together in the wilds of the Matto Grosso in "Jungle Wife." She became quite skilled with the bow and later joined a select group of archers who have taken the mighty tiger with a bow and arrow. Her bow was ? A fifty pound yew made by Dr. Klopsteg and given the Siemels as a wedding present.

    Sasha Siemel was from a very rare breed of fearless hunters of dangerous big game.

    Take a few minutes to look at the photographs in the photo gallery in the link bellow >>>

    Sasha Siemel

    Phil
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
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  6. o-hale

    o-hale Well-Known Member

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    Damn interesting reading, I always liked reading about the great hunters of dangerous game.
    Myself, I always agreed with myself to not hunt anything that hunts back.
    Thanks for posting this, I enjoyed it.
     
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  7. aloha one

    aloha one Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much! Pics of doubles are like a glimpse at the promised land.
    Aloha
     
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  8. Yoda117

    Yoda117 Active Member

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    I know a few folks who have double barreled rifles. I shudder to think of the price they paid, but they are truly works of art.

    Thanks for posting!
     
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  9. lonebull

    lonebull Member

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    Great article. Beautiful works or art plain and simple. What is not to like except the price. Just like the custom ordered Winchester lever actions from long ago. Works of art that I could spend days looking at and slobbering over, built to last generations. My kind of art museum.
     
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  10. crewchief

    crewchief Active Member

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    I watched a guy shoot a 500 double years back. When he fired the second shot he looked at and said now you're gonna see why these are a small fortune. He broke it open turned it upside down and them cigar size shells fell on the ground. I said damn!!

    Crew Chief
     
  11. Claypoppy

    Claypoppy Well-Known Member

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    The recoil!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  12. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    I have read many articles about the charging of the cantankerous Cape Buffalo and the old safari professionals using double rifles with two spare shells between the fingers of their left hand, "mighty big Kahunas to face a Cape Buffalo that is not going to back off and is going to keep coming at a swift gallop ?
    Got to be the height of "palpitations ?"

    Thanks
    Phil
     
  13. trapp2012

    trapp2012 Active Member

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    It may have not been a cape buffalo, but on one hunt I was charged by an American Bison. Though our ancestors and founders of the great wild west hunted Bison in the past for hide, meat and etcetera my hunt was a controlled hunt.
    With a .458 Lott Ruger rifle my guide and I set out to manage a problem Bison in the heard. Not only aggressive to other Bison, but a risk to the ranch.
    I hit the Bull on a walking shot in the neck. Followed a blood trail into the bush. Once found he knew we were humans, and immediately pissed off with us along with my first shot placement. He did the PBR hoof scopes of snow and dirt. My guide jumped behind a nearby tree leaving me in the open. Bison charged about half distance (15 yards) and a kill shot was placed. By far one of the most trembling experiences of my life.
    I had the .458 lott, the guide a .375 H&H and my Father with a .480 Ruger for extreme backup.

    Westly Richards makes one of the finest firearms on the market. I will be reading "The adventures of an elephant hunter" soon.
     
  14. crewchief

    crewchief Active Member

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    As for recoil I'm thinking that them old English gun makers had a formula of 500gr bullet at 2,500fps... Recoil not to bad and the empty had to fall out clean..

    Crew Chief
    PS it mite have been less than 2500 can't remember...
     
  15. slobhunter2

    slobhunter2 Member

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    That was a good read thanks for the link
     
  16. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Met up with well known Trapshooters.com forum member HSLDS at the British Shooting Show at Stoneleigh Park in the UK yesterday.
    The link below will take you to the photographs of the Westley Richards "India .600 NE Rifle" that they built in 2013 that probably outshined every other firearm in their impressive display cases.

    Westley Richards 600 Nitro Express “The India Rifle” | Westley Richards

    Engraving by Paul Lantuch with gold, diamonds, sapphire and emerald inlays, the workmanship was really outstanding with a price to match.
    If lottery money was available "I would buy one just to shoot oil drums" [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Base model no engraving starts at £79,000 add the gold the rare stones and the engraving and your only a few thousand short of £300,000

    Could not take photographs myself as all of Westley Richards shotguns and rifles were in glass display cases that were causing reflections because of the shows overhead lighting.
    Quality of workmanship and engraving as good as it could probably get on this planet "Outstanding" maybe not practical "But a Work of Art"

    Below is another link that will take you to some photographs of the Westley Richards "Africa Rifle"

    The Westley Richards ‘Africa Rifle’ – Finishing Continues with the First Assembly and the First Photo with The India Rifle. | Westley Richards

    Also below is a Westley Richards link to their "Droplock Double Rifles"

    New Guns - Westley Richards

    [​IMG]

    Phil
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2017
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  17. aloha one

    aloha one Well-Known Member

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    Ahh, that's a Sunday walk in the park! Try facing an angry wife with a 2 ton SUV bearing down on you and with 4 wheel drive and worse yet, a Reverse gear, and you with nothing but your underwear and a prosthetic leg to boot! Ha! I spit at the stinkin Buffalo, at least it won't come after you tomorrow, when your sleeping and crown you with a telephone, or push the ladder out from you when your 12 feet in the air.
    Aloha One
     
  18. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Aloha One, your doing it all wrong ?
    You need to retrain your "Good Woman" because if you give them an inch all your control is lost for ever, once you give them to much slack on their reins they think that they are free to run riot, if all else fails catch her when she is unaware and tape her up with duck tape and sit her in a darkened room until she acknowledges the error of her ways, keep a sharp stick handy in case you need to prompt her to be a more mellow person.
    They are a deadly species and need to be handled with care.
    Phil
     
  19. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Found a boxed audio copy of Beryl Markham's book "West With The Night" which is about the classic African Explorations of a young British girl who grew up in West Africa in the early quarter of the 1900's, eight cassette tape with 9 hours and 33 minutes of "EXCEPTIONAL TRUE ADVENTURES".
    I would highly recommend to anyone interested ? to search out either the book or the audio book.
    Very well written, Markham was very lucky to have lived a life of adventure and exploration.
    Also should say that Markham was the first woman to fly the Atlantic from the east to the west.

    "This letter from Ernest Hemingway to Maxwell Perkins in 1942." >>>

    "Did you read Beryl Markham's book, West with the Night? I knew her fairly well in Africa and never would have suspected that she could and would put pen to paper except to write in her flyer's log book. As it is, she has written so well, and marvelously well, that I was completely ashamed of myself as a writer. I felt that I was simply a carpenter with words, picking up whatever was furnished on the job and nailing them together and sometimes making an okay pig pen. But [she] can write rings around all of us who consider ourselves writers. The only parts of it that I know about personally, on account of having been there at the time and heard the other people's stories, are absolutely true . . . I wish you would get it and read it because it is really a bloody wonderful book."--Ernest Hemingway

    Thanks
    Phil
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
  20. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

    Joined:
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    Phil , Thank You.
    Jeff