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? on wood on 870 tc's

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bodybuilder, Apr 8, 2011.

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  1. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    ? on wood on 870 tc

    I have 2 870 TC'S they were both made in 1989. My ? is this The wood on these guns is great, One is tigerstriped and the other is kind of a blonde, The wood looks like something that would go on a higher grade of gun. I heard once that they used left over wood from their 3200's on these does anyone know anything about that?
     
  2. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I don't think that was the case. Target-grade 870s and 1100s from the "old days" usually had very nice wood and the TCs were supposed to have the nicest of all the regular production guns. Having said that, I've seen some drop-dead gorgeous lumber on TBs that is nicer than most TCs.

    There are some differences in 870 wood, the usage pattern for which I haven't completely figured out. Some TCs have the pistol grip cut off almost flush with the bottom of the stock while others have an "extension" of the wood there. And some TCs have the same extended forend used on the 870 Competition while others of about the same time frame have the shorter forend. My two TCs were made in 1986 and 1994 and both have the extended pistol grip and forend but I've seen many others with barrel production date codes older, newer and in-between mine with one feature, both features or neither feature and it doesn't seem to have anything to do with the stock style - straight comb or Monte Carlo.

    As an 870 fan, I'd love to know if there really was a pattern to those features being used.

    Here's a photo of my older gun's stock - you can see the forend length, too. I had a cap installed on this pistol grip.

    [​IMG]

    And this is the stock on the newer one.

    [​IMG]


    Ed
     
  3. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    Ed my stocks look more like your newer one. One of them looks real close to the same. Mine also has the long forearms. Do you know if your bbls are backbored? I have the chokes that came with them the super full trap and so on but my regular rem. chokes shoot in them just as well in fact I use a regular full choke and get great patterns. Thanks
     
  4. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Although the wood on the above 870's are nice, they don't really compare to the old 870 tb's and some tc's of years ago. I was a 870 collector for years and the nicest wood was called "old orange crate wood" from the late 60's to early 70's.

    This wood had a tint of orange in the wood. The tb's of that time had the nicest wood on some, some of the the tc's of that era were out of this world. Some of the tb's had D grade wood put on the tb's that had a small flaw in the wood that Remington decided not to use on their D grade guns.

    One thing you may or may not be aware of, on the old TC stocks the pistol grip is smaller. Reason for that, heavily grained wood weighs more than plain non grained wood. They took the added weight from the tc pistol grip. Look at the size of pistol grips from TA's, they are the largest, TB's are smaller than TA's, and TC's are the smallest of them all if they have great wood on them.

    I love 870's and you have two great guns with very nice wood.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  5. FIB

    FIB Member

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    I've always thought that Remington used some very nice wood on their trap guns. I may get yelled at for saying this but I think Remington uses nicer wood than I've seen on some P,K, and L guns,
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Both guns have what Remington called overbored "Target" barrels but the older gun has a .745" bore and the newer one's is .733". I spoke with a Remington media rep about the older barrels and he told me that they gradually reduced the "Target" bore size from .745" and now the largest bore they make is .730".

    You have to be careful using regular RemChoke tubes in the overbored barrels or you'll wind up with way too much choke. The overbored barrels have a tapered section right before the choke tube threads that reduces the bore diameter to Remington's standard .727". This was done so Remington wouldn't have barrels out there that a standard tube could possibly be screwed into, which would cause the wad to catch on the tube inlet if used in an overbored barrel, creating an obstruction and possible explosion. What this means is that all those overbored barrels have some amount of "built-in" choke. My older barrel has .018" of that "built-in" choke while the newer gun has .006". Using a bore gauge with those barrels is even more important than with other barrels, for a tube that is supposed to yield, say, .030" of choke constriction in a standard Remington .727" bore will yield .048" of constriction in my older TC.

    The tubes for those overbored "Target" barrels were marked "Trap Full" instead of just "Full" and so forth so they could be identified easily. A "Trap Full" tube has less constriction than a "Full" tube because some of the constriction is in the tapered section of the barrel. And since the overbore amount varied between .003" (with a .730" bore) and .018" (with a .745" bore) in those barrels, knowing the exact bore diameter is critical to knowing the amount of choke constriction you are actually using. Frankly, my experience with those "Trap" RemChokes was that they were poorly made. Their constriction amounts were all over the place and the "Trap Full" tubes I have actually have larger outlet diameters than my newer gun's bore diameter. That's "negative" choke, if there is such a term. I use a Wright's tube that has .015" of constriction in my older gun; with the .018" in my barrel, it gives me .033" of choke constriction.

    By and large, those older "Target" barrels pattern pretty well with good chokes and the larger bore diameters shoot soft but the confusion about them that was common caused Remington to abandon the overboring idea.

    Ed
     
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