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Olympic Victory

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Drew Hause, Feb 28, 2010.

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  1. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    1912 Olympic Games


    June 22
    http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1912/VOL_59_NO_16/SL5916031.pdf


    Just before the departure of the American Olympic trap shooting team, C. W. Billings, captain of the team, broke 95 out of 100 at the New Jersey State Shoot, shooting Olympic style. F. Hall broke 129 straight, using only one barrel in one string of 25. Three members of the team, D. McMahon, R. Spotts and E. A. Renney, use Remington automatics.

    July 6, 1912
    AMERICA WINS


    http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1912/VOL_59_NO_18/SL5918031.pdf


    With Jay Graham Leading, Wearers of Stars and Stripes Smash 532 Out of 600
    Stockholm, Sweden, July 2. Special cablegram to "Sporting Life."
    The United States today upheld its right to be recognized as the foremost nation of the world in trap shooting when the American team captured the world’s team competition in the Olympic game. Wearers of the American shield shattered 532 out of 600 targets, Great Britain being its nearest rival with a score of 511. Germany was third, having shattered 510.

    America’s victory was all the more sweeping in view of the fact that Jay Graham, the great amateur of Long Lake, Ills., wearing the colors of the Chicago A. A., was high gun with 94 out of 100. Charley Billings, of the New York A. C., captain of the team, and the man through whose efforts the team was made up, was second with 93.

    It was a typical American victory, accomplished with American guns, shells and powder, and aroused great enthusiasm both among the foreign spectators and the American athletes and friends who arrived on the "Finland" on Saturday. The Americans, despite the fact that the style of shooting with the gun below the arm-pit and two shots permitted was fairly new to them, shot with all the ease and freedom of their ordinary style.


    The scores of the American team follow:
    Jay R. Graham, Chicago A. A. 94 (Remington Pump)
    Charles W. Billings, New York A. C. 93
    Ralph L. Spotts, Larchmont, Y. C. 90
    John H. Hendrickson, Bergen Beach G. C. 89
    Frank Hall, New York A. C. 86
    Dr. E. F. Gleason, Boston A. A 80





    "Olympic Boys Came Home Conquering Heroes"
    by Wayne Capooth


    The American Trap Shooting Team of the 1920 Olympic Games was, at the time, the greatest single group of shotgun wizards ever assembled by any one country. The six-man team that won the gold medal was composed of Mark Arie, Horace Bonser, Jay Clark, Forest McNeir, Frank Troeh and Frank Wright. In 21 shooting events, the most ever held, 13 gold medals were won in shooting, seven by the shotgun wizards.

    The last time an American shooting team had competed in an Olympics was 1912. An American team did not compete in the 1908 Games. The 1916 Olympic Games, scheduled for Berlin, were not held as Europe was in the midst of the first world war. However, when 1920 came around, America was rarin' to go, and picked a team that included the world's greatest shots at the time — any time, for that matter.

    The 1920 Olympics, held in Antwerp, Belgium, provided a stage for America's great trapshooting stars. They won all the medals, with Mark Arie (95x100) winning the gold, Frank Troeh the silver and Frank Wright the bronze in individual shooting.

    By breaking straight the last 10 targets, thrown from a multiple of nine traps, “unknown” as to release and angles, Arie did that which European shooters considered almost impossible. No Olympic contestant had ever before accomplished the feat. The six shooters won the team title with 547x600, 44 targets better than second place Belgium. It was the highest ever made in Olympic competition.

    After winning at the Olympics, their trophies were presented to them by the Count Ballet de Latour at his beautiful castle home near Hoogboom, about 12 miles out of Antwerp.

    Returning home, the ship's captain arranged a “Deep Sea Championship of the Atlantic” between the team members, which Arie won. That night in the salon of the Lapland they auctioned off the last empty shell Mark Arie had shot to win the individual Olympic championship. An England man bought it for 40 pounds.

    Arie used his Marlin Model Model 28 (introduced in 1913) in the Olympic games. The gun and Olympic medals are shown on p. 396 in "Marlin Firearms: A History of the Guns and the Company That Made Them" by William S. Brophy but is mislabeled as a Model 43 which was not introduced until 1922.
    Troeh used a Smith, but later switched to a Model 12.
     
  2. Sportshot

    Sportshot Active Member

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    Nice find Drew. Thanks for sharing!
     
  3. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1914/VOL_62_NO_24/SL6224024.pdf


    At the Sunny South Handicap, the big six-day shoot at Houston, Tex., Mark Arie, of Thomasboro, Ills., gave another splendid exhibition of his superior trap shooting ability by winning the high amateur average for all targets thrown and also the Sunny South Handicap, premier event of the week. In winning the big handicap event, Arie broke 94 out of a possible 100 targets, although handicapped by shooting from the extreme distance 22 yards. He also made high score over all 1140x1205 94.6 per cent. He was using a brand new, specially built, Marlin hammerless trap gun, D grade, which he had never given a real tryout until he started shooting at Houston.
    Arie made the remarkably high average of 96.17 per cent, on all his registered 16-yard targets for 1913, breaking 1587x1650. Selecting a new gun, for 1914, Arie decided that the Marlin hammerless trap gun was the best gun with which to endeavor to better his remarkably high average of 1913.
     
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