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Older shooters, do you remember?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by senior smoke, Jun 8, 2013.

  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Hello:
    When my son flew in from Sweden recently, I started telling him and his fiancé of items that I remember purchasing or receiving as gifts years ago. They are in their early 30's so they don't remember them, do you?

    Do you remember Black Jack chewing gum? This had to be the worst gum I ever chewed. I think they had two others but I can't remember the names. Also waxed soda water bottles, small button candy that was attached to paper.

    Do you remember using yo yo's and Top's as kids? How about Push carts? When we got our first TV it had a small screen with a mirror in front of it to make the picture larger. I think the brand was a Hoffmann.

    How about getting deliveries from the coal men? I remember my dad starting the furnace as a kid. I also remember the ice man with a large block of ice on his shoulder and a leather pad under the ice, as well as the large tongs that he used.

    I remember Pat Boone singing April Love, and all the kids including me had to have White bucks. I remember my first BB gun. How about Sir Walter Raleigh coupons and all the gifts you could get. How about S&H green stamps?

    What do you remember from years long gone?
    Steve Balistreri
    Wauwatosa Wisconsin
     
  2. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Do you remember Black Jack chewing gum? This had to be the worst gum I ever chewed. I think they had two others but I can't remember the names. Also waxed soda water bottles, small button candy that was attached to paper.

    All of the above are still available. Mike.
     
  3. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    How about the "B" side of Pat Boone's hit "Love Letters in the Sand"...???
    If you know THAT one, you probably spent waaayyyy too much time listening to the Hi-Fi.
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure of the title, but I believe it was Bill Ayers' favorite.

    Bob Falfa
     
  5. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Steve I remember all of that stuff too
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Of course I remember all that stuff ... plus lots more!

    Such as .... Of course I remember all that stuff .. such as ...
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    Of course I remember all that stuff ...
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    such as ...
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    what kind of choke tubes were you talking about?
     
  7. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    I have an unopened pack of Black Jack gun, cost a buck at the swap mart ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  8. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Mike and WPT:
    I can not believe they still sell that stuff? Have not seen it since I was a kid.
    Steve
     
  9. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I STILL like Black Jack chewing gum!
     
  10. spcltrap90t

    spcltrap90t Member

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    bemans and cloves gum
     
  11. 101Diamond

    101Diamond TS Member

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    I remember everything but the ice. That Black Jack gum sucked. But I'm just a young buck. Will be 62 tomorrow and the Eagle will shit on my house in August.
     
  12. Rem29

    Rem29 Member

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    How about BoNoMo turkish taffy, Put it in the fridge then smack it on a hard surface to break it. Another one JuJu B's lasted the longest of any movie candy. Mallow Cups, save up 500 points and get 10 free if you mail the points in. Dots, blacks mounds of gummy that stuck to your teeth. Sen Sen - ultra strong licorice that was supposed to get smoke off your breath.
     
  13. maka

    maka Member

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    Remeber saving Kingsberry beer coupons. 1/2 points on 7oz. and 1 full point on 12oz. In those times almost everyone still smoked including, my parents. My brother and I save enough coupons to by each parent a silver colored ash tray with two pelecans with open mouths to hold cigs.
     
  14. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    spcltrap90t:
    I got the shakes after I read what you wrote. That stuff should have been banned it taste so awful.
    Steve

    In my opinion, the best movie theatre candy was Boston baked beans. I told my kids that a movie theatre charged 25cents for two movies and cartoons. I miss the Westerns at the movies with the Duke and Randolph Scott.

    My daughter is over visiting and she just walked by and ask me who Randolph Scott was? I said one of the best actors in Hollywood. She said I never heard of him. I hope the young kids of today can have a childhood and memories like we had.
    Steve
     
  15. chuckie68

    chuckie68 Active Member

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    To; the beast,

    The eagle craps on my doorstep in November, if there is any left. I still like "Black Jack" and if you remember "Snaps" candy? Hollow tubes of licorice about a half inch long and coated with some kind of candy. Two cents a box.

    Chuck
     
  16. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

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    You know when you're getting old when you know more dead trapshooters than live ones. I remember getting Coke or Pepsi for 5 cents and a Hostess Twinkie 2 pack for 15 cents; Super Shell was 29.9 per gallon. I can actually remember when kids respected teachers or they regretted it. As great are the electronics today, my little 9 volt RCA transitor radio was a treasued possession. This makes up part of who I am. I wouldn't trade growning up in the early 50's for anything. We were poor but our clothes were always clean and we didn't get anything without working for it. BT100dc
     
  17. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    That was back when you could go into a cafe and in the booth on the wall above the table you could drop a quarter into the selection box and hear 3 songs of your choice on the juke box. Or you could play a pin ball machine for a nickle.
     
  18. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I was visiting my mom in the hospital the other day, and we got on the subject of back when I was a kid in Omaha.

    I remembered going to Crossroads Mall to shop at Brandeis. There was a large water fountain that I liked to see, and we'd walk past the "shimmering" gold hued metal wall to a lunch counter, where I'd get a hot dog or hamburger. We lived on 76th not far from Maple, so Crossroads was a short trip by car, over at 72nd and Dodge.

    There was also a shoe store there that had big plastic elephants, one gray and the other brown. Kids could climb up their behinds, walk through the middle, then slid down their trunks. We saw those still in the store on a visit there in 2004. They were huge to a kid, but were pretty small as an adult.

    I also remember the Poll Parrot Shoe Store that had a big parrot in a cage. They also sold Buster Brown shoes. in those days, Keds and Red Ball sneakers were THE shoes to wear.

    We also ate at Kings restaurant. We'd go there for burgers and onion rings. Those were the first onion rings I ever had. While they had the usual 50's and 60's style booth seating, the booths had not only the usual 3 for a quarter song players, but also a black telephone. You'd use the phone to call in your order.

    I also remember going to Burger King the first time in Omaha, and was disgusted to find salad dressing on my burger. As a kid, it was mustard, ketchup, cheese, pickles, lettuce and maybe mild onions. Anything else was contamination. We never ate at McDonalds, but I would if I was with friends whose parents took us there.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Somewhere in the garage is my old Texaco fire chief's helmet. Still have it after all these years.

    I remember Black Jack gum. Most kids did not care for black licorice. We liked the red licorice. But even for licorice, Black jack was just nasty. It wasn't really licorice, as they used anise to flavor it. The gum of choice for kids was either Juicy Fruit Striped Gum or whatever round ball gum that came out of gum ball machines. Most of those were placed in stores by the Lions Club.

    [​IMG]

    One of my favorite toys was my Tonka Clamshell Truck. I recall a really good strapping when I got caught using it to dump sugar onto my cornflakes. My parents solved the mystery of who was spilling sugar all over the dining room.

    I also remember the non-carbonated drinks that came in little wax bottles, and there were even some shaped like lips.

    How about Mr. Potato Head, when you used an actual potato? It was several years before they made a plastic potato.

    I was also in that transitional era between Erector Sets and more modern building toys like Legos and Mattel Super City, along with the old kenner girder kits. I preferred the latter two because you could build big, tall structures. Legos were expensive even back then, greatly limiting the size of projects.

    Matchbox cars were THE car to have. It was 1967 before Hot Wheels came out. from that point on Hot Wheels dominated. The track worked nicely with the Super City and Kenner sets as you could build bridges and run the track through them. Moms found the track made a handy spanking device and was readily available in your room, so justice was swift instead of waiting fer he to go find a belt.

    And by the mid to late 60's if your bike was not a Sting Ray style, you weren't cool. I had a green AMF Renegade that I'd do wheelies on, and we'd go down steep hills and jump off of dirt mounds. I'm surprised I never broke any bones and I can recall a few times hitting the ground running while the bike continued to sail through the air, crashing in a heap. And the cool tires were 'slicks", especially those with a red stripe.

    How about the Mattel Tommy Burst? That was a Thompson machinegun that would blast though a whole roll of caps. Or the Mattel six shooters that used cartridges with springs that propelled the bullets when the "primer" was struck. My first taste of gun control was when the moms in the neighborhood confiscated all our ammo after one of the kids got hit in the eye.

    Most of us had very large yards, and many parents grew vegetable gardens. I remember swiping peppers and onions and crushing their juice into squirt guns. Chemical warfare. Your opponents could not claim you missed them when they got hit in the eyes. I recall that eventually resulting in some red behinds.

    Orange and especially Grape Crush were the preferred drinks of kids. We had Nesbitts too, but Crush was more common. Dad's and Hire's were the common root beers, and I recall my mom making Hire's root beer from their kits and letting the bottle ferment in the basement. (Yeast carbonized them.)

    The cool cartoon was Johnny Quest, and even to this day I like to wear blue jeans and a black t-shirt. I also recall as a kid being outraged when Johnny Quest was taken off the air after some senate committee on violent cartoons cited it as the worst offender on TV, bar none. Fortunately it went into reruns on a local station.

    And we kids ate up Lost in Space. I remember when I was in my 40's and it came back to TV. I thought, wow, I used to never miss this as a kid. Now I realize how silly and lame it was, but to a kid, it was uber cool.

    Never missed Lassie, either, and not just the color version with Ranger Cory Smith, but the old B&W version with Timmy. June Lockhart was the mother, and that predated her stint in Lost in Space. I remember one episode where Lassie got hurt and for whatever reason the only way to get her to town was for Ranger Smith to canoe her down a log flume. When we moved to Oregon I was surprised to find that old log flume still in operation about forty minutes from our house in the Columbia River Gorge.

    We mostly went to drive in movies with the neighbors, though my mom would take us to matinees. I remember seeing Disney's Jungle Book on the big screen, which came out in 1967. And as kids Disney was one show we never missed, along with Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom with Marlin Perkins. The evening lineup was Wild Kingdom, Disney, then Bonanza. It was during Bonanza we had to get ready for bed, and the faster we did, the faster we could get back and watch it. Then the Ed Sullivan show came on, and that signaled bed time. But, if Topo Gigio or some really special guest for kids came on, my parents would come and get my sister and I out of bed so we could watch it.

    Another thing I miss about being a kid in Omaha was our home with a daylight basement. We had enough room to ride bikes in a big loop in it, as it was all open save for the furnace, hot water heater, water softener and laundry machines in the middle. My dad brought home discarded telecommunications equipment and we set up a "spaceship" in the basement with it. My friends would come over and we'd play Lost in Space. The living room had a big view window overlooking Omaha. When a lightning storm would roll through my mom would turn the sofa around and make popcorn. Then we'd oooo and aaah over the display. I can also recall taking shelter in the basement several times because of tornado threats, including one that almost hit the neighborhood.

    And who can forget the first time you were "old enough" to walk to the supermarket by yourself with money to get your mom some ingredient she needed for dinner? My reward was being able to buy myself a pop from the machine at the gas station I had to walk by. They had Grape Crush. I think it was 15 cents, because it took two coins to buy it.
     
  19. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    BT-100dc:
    I agree totally.
    Steve
     
  20. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Brian:
    Great response. I told my kids that they use to sell candy cigarettes and they could not believe it. Can you imagine a company selling them today?

    I remember a Lassie episode where Lassie barked once and June said" Timmy is down at the river and he's hurt? I saw one episode of Omaha's Wild Kingdom with Marlin Perkins as he said that his side kick I think his name was Jim was pulled into the water from a row boat by a huge Boa, and he said there's Jim fighting a Boa. Next scene all you saw was Jim's hat floating in the water. Great TV.
    Steve