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Oil finish suggestions

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by len loma, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. len loma

    len loma TS Member

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    I am refinishing the stock on my Italian sporting OU and would like to go with a true oil finish. I looked at our local stores and found most of the oil finishes have varnish added. I'd rather stay with the soft matte luster of a true oil finsih. Whats you recommendations on wood preperation and type of oil to use? Thank you, Len
     
  2. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    If you want a "true" oil finish you are limited to a couple. Linseed and tung oil. I wouldn't use either. They dry slowly and take forever. Everything else is modified oils or esters. True-oil is a common finish. I don't use it because when it's applied thick enough to cover the grain it has a green tint in the sunlight. I like Permylyn, available from Brownells. It's easy to achieve any degree of luster desired.
     
  3. Michael Gregory

    Michael Gregory Member

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    Len, I'd go with Tung oil. I was always told that it goes deeper into the wood and "locks in" to the pores in the wood better than any other oil. You can usually get about 1 coat per day if you don't go too thick. It's also very "user friendly" and easy to apply. Thin the first coat about 25%. Wipe each coat on with your bare hands and let it sit 5-10 minutes, then wipe off the exess and let it dry. My experience is that this gives excellent results and won't give you any kind of sheen unless you put on a lot of it. Also.... Important... you need to find PURE tung oil, often only at specialty wood working supplies. If you buy something like "Formby's Tung Oil Finish", it is a tung oil and varnish mix of some sort, with some sort of drier in it to make it set a bit faster, so be careful what you buy. Formby's is probably a good product by the way, has its place, and comes in at least a couple of different gloss levels, but it will have more 'build' and more gloss, and therefore is probably not what you want. Regarding Johnny's post, I've used Tung oil for years and never really noticed the "green tint" he's talking about, but now I'm going to watch for it and see if I notice it. It may also be something that happens over time, as all of these oil finishes tend to "amber" up as they age a bit. My e-mail is above, let me know if I can be of any other help. Good luck! Mike
     
  4. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Michael Gregory , the "green tint" comment is about Birchwood Casey's True-oil, not Tung oil. Most people put on only a few coats and never notice.

    I wouldn't use Formby's or anything similar from the local paint store. That stuff may be ok for a table that sets in the house all day but not a gun stock.
     
  5. abbielew

    abbielew TS Member

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    I have rerfinished a number of stock over the years and have never noticied
    a green tint on any of them. I have even refinished a china hutch with
    True Oil and find it stands up as well as any other finish.

    Birddog
     
  6. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Pro-comp is another modified oil product.

    abbielew , how many coats have you applied to any stock or the hutch? All of the finishes being discussed are low build finishes. That means it takes many, many coats to achieve a glass smooth finish. I put 70 coats of Permylyn on the last stock I made. Most people put on a few coats and they are done. It is impossible to fill the grain and achieve a glass smooth finish with a few coats. Most all the modern finishes on guns now are a two part epoxy clear-coat finish. They can be sprayed and finished to a glass smooth finish with less than a dozen coats. All in one day.
     
  7. Hookedonshooting

    Hookedonshooting TS Member

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    Understand using and wanting an oil finish. But if you have nice wood, consider hitting it with several light coats of a satin poly. My M12 set turned out pretty nice doing it. And the results make it look different than any other m12. Which may be good or bad. And its easier by alot!
     
  8. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    MAH66 , I have seen that product. It's sold through Brownells. I think there is only one product called Pro- something or other. It's modified oils. They all are or else they are an ester. I think the only pure oils are Linseed and Tung.

    If 20 coats suits you that's fine. Some people don't like the shiny look, I do. I like a glass smooth finish and I can't do that with 20 coats. Anyone that can would be way out of my league.


    Hookedonshooting , Good luck trying to fix dings with a finish like that.
     
  9. Hookedonshooting

    Hookedonshooting TS Member

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    Damn it Johnny dont jinx me Man! LOL and yes i carry it around like a baby.
     
  10. Rick in Ohio

    Rick in Ohio Member

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    I have used Boiled Linseed Oil but if you're going to use it you better thin it down some or it will take forever to dry.

    The book that come with my Casear Guerini calls for Boiled Linseed Oil.
     
  11. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Tru-Oil can be finished out to a gloss, but also can be knock down to a satin with some rotten stone.

    I like the tru-oil because it does have drier in it. During warm still days, I hang the wood outside for quicker dying. I can hand wipe a coat in the morning and wet sand and apply another late in the afternoon. You cannot do that with boiled linseed oil. I think the warm air, sun shining, and UV speed the drying process.

    You should have most of the grain filled with 10 coats with another 5-10 on top. Tru-oil also make repairs quick and easy.
     
  12. len loma

    len loma TS Member

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    I have a can of boiled linseed oil that I have used on shovel and wood too handles in the past to help keep wood from drying out. I really can't remember how fast it drys but handles were never tacky when I used them. Maybe if wood is sticky it will help me keep my head down on stock. Len
     
  13. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    MAH66 , Ok, ok, I should have said the only two oils used on stocks.

    Linseed oil is not very good relatively speaking. That was only used when that was all they had. It can develop water spots

    Never could get a smooth defect free finish with 20 coats of thin finish, don't know how that is done. I use Herter's French Red stock filler also. After 20 coats mine would still look like the finish on a basketball. Even after I have a glass smooth finish, Permalyn and True-oil will continue to dry and shrink. A year later I can see the grain in the finish again.
     
  14. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    A real oil finish is made from boiled linseed, a wax (typically Carnauba), a thiner (typically turpentine) and a drying agent (Japan drier).

    It is still made and used in the UK.

    If you are having troubles finding it be in touch via PM - I have some...
     
  15. abbielew

    abbielew TS Member

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    I can finihs a stock in 15 to 20 coats of Tru Oil. Yes, you can finish a
    stock with Tru Oil in 15 to 20 coats and pores are all filled if you know what are doing.

    70 coats of Permylyn, tells me you are doing something wrong.

    Birddog
     
  16. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    GunDr - explain it to me. People talk about toning down a gloss finish with fine wool or rottenstone. Any stock I've ever seen that done to just gets shiny again after a little bit of handling. Do you just keep taking the finish down every year or two?
     
  17. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    oil finishing wood is a 3000 year old tradition. it darkens the wood. hides the figure and grain. and continues to darken with age. think about it: when they're trying to sell you on a little $2000 piece of wood just big enough for a gun stock, do you think that wood is finished in oil? no. it's rubbed with water or alcohol. they take the picture. you buy it. then cover it in oil. go figure. good luck with it
     
  18. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    We used to have a product in Canada called Flecto Varathane Plastic Oil finish (FVPO). It was a wonderful product and easy to use, plus it was compatible with the company;s urethane finishes. So when I was finishing my Ljutic I put on probably 30 coats of hand rubbed FVPO using finer and finer wet and dry papers until I got to 1500 grit. Then did a final rub down with a terry towel and let it sit for 2 months. The grain was completely filled and the finish was durable and water resistant and looked like a British "best gun". The product was taken off the market here some years ago. Don't know if anything like it exists anymore.

    Ron Burr