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Off topic. Prostrate cancer

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by chovyman, Aug 15, 2012.

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  1. chovyman

    chovyman Member

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    Hey guys loom 62 just got the bad news prostrate cancer. Anyone out there willing to share the road they picked for treatment and why and results??

    Many thanks
     
  2. trappermike

    trappermike Well-Known Member

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    Prostate. Not prostrate.
     
  3. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Most important thing with all major medical problems is the level of care available where you live.

    In NY its Sloan Kettering, In NC its DUKe. In Florida its Moffitt, In Texas its MD Anderson.


    If there are no major league facilities nearby, get out of Dodge, you only have one life zero do overs

    Prayers with you.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Mine was dealt with in 1997. I had the prostate surgically removed and the surgeon later told me that the cancer ran through the involuntary sphinter muscle requiring it's removal but that the cancer also ran to the very edge of the voluntary sphinter muscle which was my last resort to not having to carry urine around in a bag. He deserved a hug for that decision and you can still have good control in that situation.

    In about 2004, it was determined that there was still cancer, no doubt from the info above, and I was convinced I should have the radiation for a fix. Well, I did have the radiation when approaching age 64. Knowing what I experienced there, I WOULD NOT have the radiation again as I likely would have died naturally before the cancer progressed to be fatal. The radiation leaves you with situation like blood in in stools that may last a short period or very long.

    BTW, loss of the involuntary sphinter put an end to normal sex. I know there are newer and maybe better choices but the radiation still needs to be discussed at length if recommended.......breakemall
     
  5. chovyman

    chovyman Member

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    Guys thanks for your help input Michael
     
  6. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully you caught it early enough.

    My longtime friend and hunting partner found out too late earlier this year and was gone in two months.
     
  7. Bernie K

    Bernie K Member

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    If you have surgery try and find someone that does robotic surgery it is the best and least down time.
     
  8. Gross Man

    Gross Man Member

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    I had mine removed at Johns Hopkins over 10 years ago. I agree with Phil's advice. I spent days researching on the internet. That helped me a lot. I saw three Docs for opinions and chose surgery. Billy
     
  9. Dbl Auto

    Dbl Auto Active Member

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    Check out this website.
    Doug Allison
     
  10. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    You have a PM. I had mine removed in Jan. 2010 @ Ohio State. Pick a Dr. with lots of experience.
     
  11. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Sending prayers out...my loved ones have never been lucky enough to catch any of the big C in time enough other than to prolong their lives...they did get the greatest of care through Johns Hopkins Oncology unit though...they fought as hard for us as you could ever hope for..research a lot but tell him to move as quick as possible and get a different Dr if the one he has is non-chalant and doesn't he seems to think things are urgent in nature...you need to attack it head on to beat it
     
  12. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    As a prostate cancer victim myself, I note some fairly outdated misperceptions on the various treatments and outcomes. The two major mainstream treatments are, of course, surgery and radiation (and variations of these such as Proton therapy, cryotherapy, etc, open surgery, laproscopic and robotic laproscopic, and so forth) Which treatment is best is one of the most personal decisions you will ever have to make. No one can really do this for you. Each treatment has its adherents and benefits, and each treatment has its drawbacks (there is no perfect, one solution fits all here, just what is best for you, your lifestyle, personal considerations, state of your health generally, etc).

    Both surgery and radistion treatments have made great strides in the last 10-15 years, in terms of success and in reducing the undesirable side effects. In surgery, the introduction of Robotic Assisted Laproscopic surgery (the DaVinci machine) has improved the surgeons ability to do what is knowbn as "nerve sparing" surgery. This has reduced, though certainly not eliminated the issues of ED and incontinence which can occur with surgery. In radiation, new technologies introduced in the last 15 years (and continually improved) such as the use of carefully targeted radiation (image guided/intensity modulated radiation therapy-IG/IMRT) has greatly reduced many of the side complications such as incontinence and to some extent, ED, and in particular bowel issues. Radiation, for instance, now has a better success rate for avoiding incontinence issues than surgery, although ED issues are statistically about the same for both types of treatment, albeit they can occur at different points in your life.

    Several recently completed major long term studies of prostate cancer victims treated by one or the other of the major treatment types indicate little statistical difference in the 10 and 15 year cancer specific mortality rates between surgery and radiation (i.e., the 10 year cancer specific mortality rates for both Robotic surgery and IMRT are between 2-3 percent)

    So what is best? Only the individual can answer that. Get all the input and advice you can from your doctors. Get referrals to each type of treatment, hear what they offer and what is involved. Look at the various issues, problems, affects on life quality, risks of each, and so forth. With prostate cancer, you rarely need to make an immediate decision on this. It is basically a long term thing (especially now with more early detection thanks to more regular and frequent PSA testing, etc) so take some time. Think things through, study the options, and go with what works for you-not what worked for some one else (for example, some folks just have a need "to get the cancer out"
    For such as they, surgery is likely a better choice. But some, due to other health issues, age, or just aversion to surgery, are perhaps not good candidates for surgery. Their are decision trees available on the internet which use a series of questions to help one determine what category one might be in for instance.

    Also, look for forums and other groups of prostate cancer victims via the web. Many folks post their experiences, how they approached the issue, what they did or did not choose, etc. One such group that I think is very good is called "YANA" (stands for You Are Not Alone) Such groups can help you focus your thoughts and feelings on this. Prostate Cancer (like all cancers I suppose) is a life changing experience and can be a very emotionally difficult road, so if you need help, seek it out.

    One last piece of advice. Whatever treatment you select, try to get the most experienced people in that treatment you can. One thing studies have shown, is that the more experienced the doctor (and facility) is, the better the likely the outcome. There are no guarantees with prostate cancer. Only probabilities. And doctor experience can enhance those probabilties favorably.

    Jim R
     
  13. mallard2

    mallard2 Active Member

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    What is a average lay-up time for surgery? Back to office type work in ? days, weeks, or months?
     
  14. Garry

    Garry Active Member

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    Ditto to what Jim R said above. Especially his last paragraph.
     
  15. Jack L. Smith

    Jack L. Smith Member

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    1. I am a 4 year survivor, & with a Doc in the family, I got lot's of advice
    2. ASAP Go Buy Dr. Patrick Walsh's book "Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer" & read it. It covers your disease, before and after, and makes you better educated to understand the information you are going to get over the next 2 months. Walsh started the nerve sparing surgical solution; now most surgeries are DiVinci robotic.
    3. You may want your wife or significant other to read the book, or sections of it. It creates a mutual understanding and expectation.
    4. I chose Robotic Surgery because of my life expectancy (I was only 53 at diagnosis) and in otherwise good health. I wanted as complete a cure as possible and surgery is the best alternative to achieve that.
    5. If you choose surgery, you'll be in bed for most of the next week, (with a catheter) although you can walk and get around.
    6. 4 weeks after surgery I played 18 holes of golf and had my best score of the year because I had to stay balanced and slow my swing down. However, prostate surgery is not recommended as a golf improvement procedure.
    7. Not everything will work as it did before.( get it ? ) People have differing degrees of recovery. You may like some of the the treatments, or not. It does get better, but may take a couple years. Some alternative ALWAYS work. PM me if you want details.
    8. a lot of guys get this, and we kid that prostate cancer is the new healthy, so success is very possible and probable.
    9. suggested treatments can be influenced by the devices that your local medical center just invested in. For me surgery was the only one that doctors said was a cure. If it's out, it's out.
    10. Plate appearances. Who would you want shooting on your squad? I knew my urologist since high school, and thank heavens he did such a great job of diagnosis. My PSA was under 1.0 and he discovered the cancer by DRE and feel, then a biopsy. However, his practice had only done "about 70" robotic prostatectomies. I switched to a urologist that had personally done over 300 DiVinci procedures. Get advice and then take control over your choices. Find the Phil Kiner or Harlen Campbell of your treatment option.
    11. be patient after the surgery and recovery & it will all work out.

    PM me if you want any more.

    js in PA
     
  16. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    Mallard2:
    Using the DeVinci machine, I was out of the hospital in 2 days, then went home. i work from home anyway, so there was zero lost time in my case, and I actually returned a business call as soon as I woke up after surgery, however going back to the office would depend on the patient. You will use a cathater for a couple of weeks, and they are a real nuisance.
    So I guess there is no set answer, but sitting at home for a week or 2 is probably most common.
    Anyway, I went thru it all last summer, 2011, and if anyone wants more specifics, please contact me at davidjayuden@msn.com.
    dju
     
  17. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Jack and jimrich have very good explanations. A week to 10 days with the cath unless you strain yourself or there is a leak in plumbing.

    Everyone is different when it comes to getting that little muscle to work at the bladder. Some take days, some take months. Your urologist will probably have you do Kegal exercises prior to your surgery.
     
  18. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    I had mine taken out when I was 41 so I guess that makes it about 18 yrs ago, I went to the Dr for routine stuff, they were going to take blood work so I told him to check my PSA, he said I was too young I told him to check it anyway, he said the ins co might not pay for it I told him BFD, my Dad died from it so he checked it it came back high, they did biopsies came back positive, that's when my GP said aren't you glad WE caught it, I told him to KMA

    I was good for 4 yrs then it came back, went in for Radiation the oncologist told me to loose 85 lbs, went on starvation diet for 90 days and lost it ( If my wife hadn't been with me at the oncologists office, I probably would have told her they said I was going to die, the diet was the worst part) But I got nuked guess it was because I was young, but I never missed a day of work it didn't seem to phase me the oncologist couldn't believe it as he said I was getting a maximum dose.

    I've been good since then, I was in the hospital for 3 days after surgery they wanted to keep my 3-4 days more, but told the urologist if I had problems I would go to his office so he let me out, actually I told him let me out or I was going AWOL.

    I'm sure things have changed since then and have gotten better

    At about the same time I knew a guy who was a little older than me that went with the nerve sparing surgery and he died a couple years ago, but I think his doctor messed it up, my sex life is okay,( with the help of the little pills) I was going to get a testosterone shot, figured that might help, but they said since I had prostate cancer it would be like tossing gas on a fire, it very well could flare up again

    Don't know if that is true, but I trust this Dr
     
  19. Release Trigger

    Release Trigger Member

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    Choyman,

    Not sure if you would qualify, but try to find out about Bracki-therapy, I was treated this way in November 08 and nearly four years later have reading of .06% which myself and my surgeon are very happy about, still able to keep the wife more than happy and was not invasive surgery at all.
    Would do it again in a heartbeat.

    PM me if you want more details, only too happy to help/share info.

    Regards, Gary Kennerson. 96 05145..........Downunder
     
  20. pechere

    pechere Member

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    Whatever you decide, best wishes!
     
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