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O/TWhat to soak deer roasts in to draw out blood?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by DoubleAuto, Jan 23, 2010.

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  1. DoubleAuto

    DoubleAuto Active Member

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    My stepson just called and said someone is giving him a couple of deer roasts. He is wanting to know how he needs to handle the roasts before they are cooked.

    He needs to know:

    What is the best thing to soak/marinate the roasts in to get the most blood out of the meat? How long should the roasts soak? How often should the marinate be changed?

    Is something like this best cooked in a crock pot or some other way?

    Any other information on cooking deer roasts.

    I know my father used to buy teriyaki sauce by the gallon and would soak the deer roasts given him in that. They always came out pretty good and tender.

    Any help is appreciated.

    DoubleAuto
  2. J.D. Squire

    J.D. Squire Member

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    Yep soak it in salt water then get a glass casserole dish and then put the deer roast in the dish set the oven on 350. While the oven is getting warm inject or stab butter into the meat - i use lots of butter it keeps the meat moist and tender, then poor olive oil over the meat too and add your favorite seasoning (i like montreal steak). Then stick a meat thermometer in and put it all in the oven. Take it out once the thermometer reads 135-140. Let sit for ten minutes and then cut and eat.

    J.D.
  3. shootman

    shootman TS Member

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    If it is mule deer soak it over night in salt water. If it is whitetail just trim off the silver and cook it like a beef roast with potatoes,onions,carrots on 350-375 for about 11/2-2 hours depending on how you like your meat done. Dont forget about a tablespoon of worchester. BOB
  4. DoubleAuto

    DoubleAuto Active Member

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    The roasts are from a whitetail.

    Thanks for the information so far by all.

    DoubleAuto
  5. Chadshot

    Chadshot Member

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    I follow most of the above but do sometimes marinade in italian dressing, mainly for steaks but have done roasts in it also.
  6. DJM

    DJM Member

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    No need to soak it in anything. Sprinkle half an envelope of onion soup mix over it and either oven roast or crock pot it along with your potatoes , onions, carrots, celery etc.
  7. BAD 303

    BAD 303 Active Member

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    Soak in vinager over night and then marinate in soy,teriyaki,brown sugar and a can of regular coca cola for 24 hours. Cook it on a charcoal grill but do NOT overcook it. I have never found a better venison recipe anywhere.
  8. miketmx

    miketmx Active Member

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    I don't make roasts, only steaks, back strap filets, and pure ground deer burger with no beef or pork. I'm paying good money for anti-cholesterol meds so why add to the problem.
  9. poacherjoe

    poacherjoe Member

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  10. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    The salt water works for everything, waterfowl, birds, animals.

    Anything that has too strong a taste (like coots) you parboil for 10 minutes in baking soda and water. then cook normally. Don't use the scum that floats to the top.

    There is nothing wrong with the blood, but in the case of bruising or clotting you want to get that out of there. It can make objectionable jparts of the dish.

    Double Trouble has it pretty right. You can add some beef broth made with soup starter while cooking to modify the taste a little if you want.

    HM
  11. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    Two tablesponns of Dijon mustard in two cups of buttermilk, soak over night, next day rinse, cook in a crockpot like a pork/beef roast (packet of French Onion soup mix and one Pepsi..add veggies after an hour..when done, add some flour to the liquid and make your gravey....may take a dozen biscuits to sop up the left over gravy....YUMYUM!...LarryB
  12. Pocatello

    Pocatello TS Member

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    Years ago when I lived in Michigan the laws allowed deer hit by a vehicle to be salvaged. My neighbor hit one once and the police helped her load it in the trunk. She brought it home, and I field dressed it for her and skinned it. I was astonished by the amount of blood left in the tissue. I suspect that needed a lot of preparation to remove excess blood from the meat.

    In contrast I have never had a problem with excess blood in a deer I have shot, either with gun or bow. Almost all of the blood pools in the chest cavity and is removed while field dressing. Sometimes there is some bleeding and clotting around the entrance or exit holes, but simply cutting that away from the carcass before processing takes care of that problem. Sometimes my wife marinates steaks before cooking, but it is to add flavor or prevent excess dryness while cooking, not to remove blood.
  13. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    Hi,
    Put a 1/4 to a 1/3 c. of white vinegar in with your salt water. I HATE vinegar, it stinks and, well, yuck. BUT......it works great for drawingthe blood out of meat. I use it in catfish fillets and they come out white as can be. also on bloody gamebirds-woodcock, pheasant, etc. You don't taste the vinegar at all after the meat is cooked. Try that!
  14. wolfram

    wolfram Active Member

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    You can usually tell what the meat is going to taste like by smelling it before it gets cooked. Those big rutted up mulies we like to chase around here have to be amoung the worst and you can smell it as you are cutting it up. Best solution for that stuff is jerky or salami. The whitetail are usually a lot better and unless it is blood shot you probably don't need to soak the meat. Salt water will draw the blood out but also you will end up with a pretty dry roast. Soy, teryaki, worchester are all salt products and give the same results +/ some flavoring.

    A never miss method I like is to dry rub the roast with Moore Co. dry rub and barrel smoke it for about 90 minutes. Nice smokey flavor without a big seasoning mask. Good balance of tenderness and moisture. Really great with the younger deer or elk.
  15. trapshootingfran

    trapshootingfran TS Member

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    Let me first say I and my family eat vension 4 to 5 times a week 52 weeks a year, so I have eaten it every way possable.
    If the meat truley has alot of blood in it you need to soak it over night in milk and that's all. Next you rinse good pat dry rub with any seasoning you like, then crock pot it for 6 to 8 hrs with potatoes,carrots,celery,onion,garlic.
    The next thing you have to do is choose a good red wine and enjoy your meal. You can't go wrong doing it this way.
    eat well Fran
  16. cottondoctor

    cottondoctor Member

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    There are as many marinades out there as Carter has little liver pills – and I suspect they all serve their purpose and are good for the task –
    I have used the salt water soak and it draws blood better than anything I have tried.
    I have used milk too – suppose to remove any wild type odor and taste – may or may not work well. Have also used buttermilk, as the acids in the buttermilk will help tenderize.

    What has worked well for me – soak 10 to 20 hours in salt water for blood removal – wash it off --- then for tenderness and flavor marinate in a 50:50 mix of Orange Juice and Red Wine (cheap ones are Ok) – or 50:50 mix of Orange Juice and Bourbon (choose your brand) – Then add whatever magic flavor you like – the combination of Citric Acid (from the orange juice and the alcohol from the wine or bourbon) will tenderize and add flavor------this has really worked well on deer liver and heart too……

    But – it is your call – everyone has their own favorite and has their own taste………enjoy
  17. lostbrd

    lostbrd Member

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    Came across this website, thought it might be useful for some. One of the best deer processing pictorials I have seen.

    I am not to big on cooking the roasts whole. I like to grind for burger or sausage. I also have more success getting my family to eat it this way.

    loins and straps are the sweet meat for grilling or frying.

    Jason
  18. bill kindred

    bill kindred Active Member

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    The important thing is don't let it dry out or overcook. Anything else is just personal taste. I just brown my roasts and bake them with potatoes, onions, carrots and usually add a soup like mushroom or celery to keep it from drying out. I also like a little cooked cabbage, but add it later.
  19. huntinmama

    huntinmama TS Member

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    I am with trapshootingfran. We eat lots of deer whitetail and muley. a rutting buck is a rutting buck no matter what the breed. Flavor of deer meat is not dictated by breed but by a few factors: rutting, clean kill/properly game dressed, and what the deer is eating. if you can smell a very strong smell, i don't mess around with roasts, i just can or jerky it. When i can my meat i cube it out, raw pack in jars with 2 layers of fresh cut onions + whole garlic cloves. oh yeah i sprinkle in some pepper. You can use the meat to make lots of soups/stews, or bbq sandwhiches. The meat is extremely tender and full of great flavor. You can choose to use the juice that is in the canned meat or drain it off.
    When we shoot our deer, we gut and hang immediately, and process it ASAP (big bucks this is a must!) If you have blood in the meat that is ok, but not clots or big blood patches. that means if was not hung or processed right. I don't even use that meat, some disagree with me, and that is why you would need to soak your meat (in milk). If you soak in anything besides milk you better be marinating or your meat will be very dry, and yucky. If you soak, drain it, then marinate it for 24hrs in your choice of marinate.
    Our favorite recipes include marinating your meat. We play with making our own marinates. The boys favorite is marinating in italian dressing (doctored up) and grilling the steaks! If you do a roast i slow roast them no higher than 300 degrees to keep the moisture in. A fun recipe for tougher steaks (or a roast cut up into steaks) is: flour steaks and lightly brown on both sides, make up a gravy mixture of 1 can of cream of soup (like cream of celery, etc...) with 1 1/2 cups milk, a couple tbls flour, spices (we like creole, pepper & garlic). Pour gravy over browned meat that you have put in a 9 by 13. Now i have to make a huge batch to feed my family, but you can make this smaller. slow cook at 300 for 1 hr (give or take) about 1/2 way through you can peel some potatoes and add directly over meat to cook. the meat comes out so tender it just falls apart! make some biscuits or bread and yummy yummy! (this recipe works great for grouse, dove and pheasant)
  20. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    H2O2 will get the blood out of it.
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