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O/T You still in the stock market??

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by big joe, Dec 19, 2007.

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  1. big joe

    big joe Member

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    Im 54 and retired. All of my 401K money is in mutual funds. I cant afford to loose it. Bonds, CDs... ? What have you guys done?

    Have Fun...Joe
     
  2. Bob Schultz

    Bob Schultz Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Big Joe,

    The general concensus is that the market is still strong for the long term. Actually I have been buying some individual stocks that are, I feel, great buys right now. If you have well managed fund stocks that have good track records you should be fine. Look at the 1 year, 3 year and 5 year charts for your funds. I would bet you have had some significant gains over that period. Donward movement is normal for any market ... it presents opportunity for investment by individuals and mutual fund managers.

    Good luck and Merry Christmas.

    Bob Schultz
     
  3. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    Yeah, I'm still in, but the 08 election scares the hell out of me. If it looks like Hillary or any Democrat is going to get elected I could see a major sell off in the market. She has done told us she is going after the profits of the oil, drug, and insurance compaines, and is going to raise taxes.

    I know a guy who has made a ton of money in the market over the years, and he is moving a lot of his money into foreign stocks. He is scared of the witch.
     
  4. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    Cinton can make all the campaign promises she wants about "going after" corporate profits. That kind of thing plays well with their socialist / class warfare constituency. FORTUNATELY...this is still America and even though Clinton doesn't like it...any "going after" will have to be done by a vote in Congress to change the tax laws. If WE allow that to happen...we deserve it. Remember who owns those corporations...YOU AND ME through mutual fund investments,401 plans, etc. A lot of Americans have a part of those "evil corps." these days.
     
  5. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Big Joe....

    I have quite abit of money in the below listed Mutual Funds and they are doing well this year (and historically).

    MFS Utilities A (MMUFX)....up over 28%

    Delaware VIP Emerging Markets....up almost 40%

    These two are the aggressive/growth funds....

    I'm sure there are other funds that will produce positive numbers, but just like anything else, you have to stay current and pay attention on a daily basis. Do not (let me say that again...Do Not) allow anyone complete control of your money. If you don't understand the Mutual Fund(s) system and/or too preoccupied to manage it yourself, then you'd be better off finding a much safer haven which requires no effort to manage.

    Curt - Delaware
     
  6. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    You must remember that the dems control both the house and senate, so If a democratic president gets in they have about all promised to reverse the Bush tax cuts. Its likely a done deal. Obama and Clinton both have said they will raise taxes in "big business" You know Edwards hates business, he made a living out of raping them. I put a lot of my stuff I had in agressive mutual funds into government securities. So far I don't know if I did the right thing or not, but I sleep a little better at night. Plus I am 62 and don't want to lose what little wealth I have.
     
  7. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Big Joe, the third half of my retirement is in mutual funds a la Morgan Stanley and pretty conservative. You must remember that you don't lose a thing in downward turns unless you sell. You must learn to live with the slides that, in time, always recover and usually exceed the last high. Another way to look at it is to not focus on today vs. yesterday, this week vs. last week, this month vs. last month, even year to year but instead just recall that from 1929 till today it's always been a consistent rise in value. Bad weeks, bad months, even bad years, sure but if you're patient enough, you'll gain a lot more than the 1/2 of 1% they give you at the bank. Am I still in it? You bet and even supplementing my other retirement sources, the mutual funds continue to rise in value over time.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  8. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    Any money you need in the near future should not be in the stock market. Money you need to fund your far future, should you be fortunate enough to see it, should be in stocks so that it will outgrow inflation. You have to decide your risk level to determine the definition of near future and far future. IMO, as a minimum, near future is 5 years, 10 would be better.

    Since I am not retiring in the near future, 100% of my money is in stocks.

    Edit: And 100% self directed, of course.
     
  9. chatbrat

    chatbrat TS Member

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    I'm in the mkt big time, sure some of my stuff is lwer but I don't care unless there is a drastic cut in dividends & interest. It is a buying opportunity if you are looking for income---Buys casn be had in PVX, GMA, SFI, & ACAS---don't look at their last years performance look at their yeild---Phil
     
  10. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    You still have many years before you can begin to take money from your 401(k) without major tax hits ... leave it alone and get out of the daily worry of it. Your in it for the long haul and as long as they are good track record mutual funds you will have no problem in the long run.

    Keep it there and in the end you will have more money than you have now ... trust me ... I should have followed my own advice many years ago but ... well ... should have but didn't and I missed a good deal of money now.
     
  11. XTFreak

    XTFreak TS Member

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    THere is nothng wrong with a good balanced fund.

    ABALX (American Funds Balanced). Steady 8-10% of the long term without the roller coaster ride of growth and foreign funds. You can go that route if you want to take a hands-off approach. To maximize your gains, you have to manage you money. Right now, foreign investment funds and small cap funds are on fire. You should take advantage of that while the 20%+ growth is there and bail out when they stagnate.
     
  12. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    Lumper's spot on....

    Besides, you probably don't have a choice. The 2 year bond yield right now is something around 3.5% (I didn't look it up for this post). You're 52 and retired. That tells me you must have saved a fair bit - congratulations, by the way.

    But if you have a million buck saved..that's only $35,000 a year in income. Before taxes. Can you really live the retired life you want to live on that kind of income? Travel, shoot, whatever?

    Even if you ladder out your bonds it would be doubtful that you could increase your income much over $50,000, before taxes, on that million bucks. Even if you CAN live on that...inflation is going to eat you up over the next 30 years.

    Most people are in the process of spending much more than they earn. They'll never retire. The majority of the people that are saving for retirement aren't saving enough and will have to have the higher earnings (and higher risk) that comes with a market position.

    So unless you've saved or inhereted a HUGE pile, leave it in the market.

    BTW, if it helps, my dad retired in 96 at the age of 57. He and mom have kept everything in the market since then and today have more money than they've ever had....
     
  13. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Why worry about the market when all you have to do is play the options in Handicap with your loose capital. A surefire path to instant riches-right?

    That's why I will stay in the Stock Market. After all, we're in it for the long term!!
     
  14. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    What we do mirrors Bob Dodd. Most of our savings is in no-load low-fee conservative mutual funds, mostly Vanguard Funds. One question I'd ask the 401-k managers is, what are the funds you're in, and what freedom do you have to put your money into different funds in their portfolio. Then if you wished to do some studying, you could go to the local library & photocopy the Morningstar Reports on the mutual funds you have, and then get professional advice on interpreting those Reports. You can study the conservative buy-n-hold mutual fund theory at Bill Schultheis's http://coffeehouseinvestor.com/ web site. Also Paul Merriman's www.fundadvice.com website. You're probably quite safe in your mutual fund 401-k portfolio, and safety is what those of us over 50-60 should be thinking. There are bond mutual funds which are exactly like stock mutual funds. Read Schultheis's advice on them, they're a good way to balance your fund portfolio; if you want to do some research, get Morningstar Reports on Vanguard's VBISX and VFITX funds. CD's are a higher-paying savings account, basically - good for storing money you may need in a year or 2. Phil E
     
  15. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Leaving the work force and rolling over my assets to an IRA. The broker is suggesting Lord Abbott. Any advice? Thanks, Mike.
     
  16. skip

    skip Member

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    Have a look at a new Company called Cake Financal
    http://www.cakefinancial.com


    They allow you to look at everyones portfolio who have signed up and see where they are in the market. What you can't see is the owners name, you make up a login name like we do here on T.S.com. Right now there is no charge for the service. I would guess at some point they will charge for the service or for advertising on the site.


    Right now I'm paying 1% annually to have my 401K managed, this might be a way to keep that 1% in my pocket. Wish I knew more about investing.


    It's a novel idea I hope it catches on. If you share your portfolio with others you are allowed to see more information.


    Enjoy
     
  17. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    57 still working a few more, I'm still all in, I keep a close watch on things and I've put stop losses in place. If a Dem wins the next election really watch the investments! All you can do is deversify and watch the market take profit and don't be the hog that get slaughterd
     
  18. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Take all that worthless cash, put it in coffee cans, and bury it in the back yard. That's the ticket. "The surest way to wealth is real estate", That's a qoute from the lips of the Baron de Rothchild in the fall of 1929. HMB
     
  19. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    "The broker suggests...."

    Anything said after that should be considered brokerspeak that loosely translates into "this makes ME (the broker) money."

    If somehow, by who knows what circumstances, you happen to have accumulated a decent amount of money, without at the same time acquiring any knowledge about how to manage money, you have two choices. Wise up pronto and make your own decisions, or find a broker you like. It is important to like your broker, so that it is easier to cope when he takes your money.
     
  20. finger

    finger TS Member

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    I'm not going to give financial advice. I have enough to do managing my own thank you. I will tell you I retired in 2003 with 100 % invested in the market, and remain so today. I have ended every year with more than I started with and I live quite well thank you. It can be done. I'll be 58 next week.

    Based on your question I urge you to spend a few dollars and buy a copy of Ric Edelmans new book "The Lies About Money". Its a quick read and very enlightening to many who have little finance background. Think about what you have learned after reading the book and then decide if you can manage your own assets or if you are better off hiring someone to do it for you.

    I will turn all of mine over to an asset manager next year, not because he/she can do better than I but because if something happens to me my wife won't have a clue. Making money is not her interest. She is very good at spending it tho. If its in a managed account she need not worry when I'm gone. Good luck and keep your eyes open. bob finger
     
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