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O/T Woodburning stoves

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by k-gunguy, Jul 31, 2008.

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  1. k-gunguy

    k-gunguy Member

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    Hi I am considering buying a woodburning stove,as an insert into my existing fireplace. This is because of price of oil to heat my house. If anyone has any experience with these stoves, ANY info would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
    Glenn
     
  2. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

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    I heat with wood. PM Me with specific questions. This is way to vague of a question as it is. "With these kinds of stoves" is vague. Do you mean fireplace inserts or a freestanding stove used as an insert? Can't tell due to the wording of your question.

    Jeff
     
  3. sasquach

    sasquach Member

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    Unless you have no other options,I would stay away from fireplace inserts. The large space behind them is notorious for collecting creosote. It condences in there and can cause a serious chimney fire. My uncle almost burned his house down with one of them,and a good friend has had his chimney on fire several times. It is almost impossible to keep the chimney cleaned out without removing the insert,which is a pain in the butt.
     
  4. hoofty43

    hoofty43 TS Member

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    My brother put a wood pellet stove in his fireplace and vented it up the chimney. Very clean,nice looking and efficient. I heated my old house with a wood stove for 10 years. Unless you can cut your own or get free wood,you won't save that much money. Also the wood should be hardwood,oak,hickory,etc.
    Then the wood should be allowed to dry for at least one year and also has to be kept dry if you are planning to use it on those days of snow or rain in the winter. The wood pile draws mice,snakes and bugs. You may bring any of these in the house if not carefull. I found that a hot burning stove burns cleaner than one that is drafted down. Always a chance for the grandkids to get burned on the hot stove also. Just somethings to think about. ....
     
  5. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Wood is not for everyone. Figure in Truck to haul, chain saws, splitter, gas and maintiance cost on equipment, Time and a good location for cutting. It is not for the faint of heart.
     
  6. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    We converted our fireplace with an insert. The trick to eliminating the fouled chimney is to knock out the flue and run a 6" stove pipe up the chimney. Flash around the stove pipe where it exits the chimney to keep birds and water out and heat in. The better inserts will have a fairly powerful circulation fan that will pummp air from the room through heat exchange tubes inside the firebox and then back into the room.

    We burn our stove all winter long and use about 3 cords of Pinon. Our natural gas biils went from about $250/month to about $80/month. I don't really consider the cost of the wood because I cut a little bit whenever I'm out in the hills on a chukar/quail trip. We also have a lot of dying cottonwoods in the neighborhood so that kind of wood is free and easy to get. If I was buying the wood at $200/cord then the insert wouldn't pay too well. A decent insert with piping will cost $1,500 so you need to think it over a bit.

    One thing that I really like about the insert is that the fire is completely contained and you don't worry about leaving the fire burning when you go to bed.
     
  7. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Any insert should be vented to and up the chimney flue and 8'' above the crown and can be swept from the inside by a certified sweep with rotary pipe brushes.
     
  8. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, I purchased a woodburning stove from an old friend, I was going to use it in the basement, my wife decide that we shouldn't do that. I have abeautiful new in the box stove that been sitting here for twenty years if any one has an interest send me a prvt messsage and we can discuss further. I'd have to uncover it to find out the brand.
     
  9. DJM

    DJM Member

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    It's just not worth it. It creates a mess in your house, it introduces a fire risk and the work is literally back-breaking. Firewood is expensive to buy per BTU and dangerous to make. IMO those who maintain it is a money saver are not doing a true accounting of the cost. I burned wood for 25 years and enjoyed the "hobby", but cannot say I made more than a buck or two an hour. My brother-in-law and I made a lot of firewood together. A year ago he had his 3rd back surgery in 14 months. Did all the heavy lifting we did contribute? Last winter my nephews father-in-law accidentally killed himself making firewood. Not the norm but always possible. Don Miller
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I liked (note the past tense) the wood burning stoves I used to have. They put out a lot of heat and you can stand next to one and rotate. If you have never done this you are missing a great part of life. I could get wood cheap in my area. A dump truck of split locust stacked in the rear of the house was $100 and that would last for over one year.

    But, they are dirty. It can be difficult to distribute the heat throughout the house and they present a serious fire hazard. Mine are gone and my heat pumps work harder in the Winter.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. bill1949

    bill1949 Well-Known Member

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    Used to heat with wood, never again. Been heating with a pellet stove for 12 years, works great and the pellets are exempt from sales tax in my state...Bill
     
  12. 6878mm

    6878mm Member

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    Wood burning for heating is GREAT, of the enclosed type
     
  13. fiftystr8

    fiftystr8 TS Member

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    Wolfram has the best advice. I did the same thing, run a pipe up through the chimney and cap it off. The airtights burn less wood but should be cleaned every couple of months. Non-airtights burn more wood but are a lot cleaner (chimney and inerior wise. Nothing like the heat from a wood burner on a cold winter day!!
     
  14. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    Been heating with wood for 17 years here in Western NY. If you have a source of inexpensive wood, you can save a lot of money over heating with propane. I get large loads of slab wood from sawmills for a couple of hundred bucks. It just becomes a way of life. Real cozy heat.

    Chris
     
  15. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Got the worse cases of pioson Ivy cutting wood, been stung a million times, Got my four wheel drive truck buried to the frame a bunch of times,strained my back and skined my knees. It can become a J.O.B if you want to be a full fledged fire tender, also can give a retired or laid off guy a primal sense of "self Efficiency".
     
  16. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    I got an insert for my fireplace. It works great. It can be a bitch to pull out and clean the fireplace. I do that at the start of every other year burning season.

    I have plenty of "free" wood. Even "free" wood can be expensive, note what shannon391 posted above, have had all the same happen.

    Check with your insurance agent. My insert went inside a masonry fireplace so insurance rates didn't change. Insurance companies don't really care for free standing stoves.

    I've got the trees, and wood. I enjoy cutting wood in the winter, and I enjoy the fire. If the fireplace was more centrally located I could probably heat the whole house with the insert.

    If you like cutting, splitting, hauling and stacking wood go for it, but if you think your going to save money????
     
  17. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    Wood is good ,use it, nature renews it, but doctors can fix your back. Pain in the ass.... and if you have a forced hot water system you could wind up with frozen pipes, in other areas of your house if you dont circulate the air enough through the house. Extreme Temp shuts off thermostats and the water freezes in the pipes. I have fixed many houses that this happens to.
     
  18. k-gunguy

    k-gunguy Member

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    Thanks everyone for their input,in my neck of the woods,oil is the only source of fuel for heat. It is 4.50 a gallon,wood delivered to the house and stacked is 220.00 a cord,now. So i am in a bind,because the stove is 4200.00 installed. Will it be worth it? Do not know
    Thanks
    Glenn
     
  19. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    I have a Vermont Cstings Sequoia EPA Woodburning Fireplace. It is a metal firebox with a catalytic converter on the flue. It is built into a chase sp it looks like a fireplace with glass doors but performs like a wood stove. It heats my 1500 sq. ft. log home which has a 23 foot ceiling. It burns a little more wood than a woos stove because I don't throttle it down. That way it keeps the CAT running hot and the creasote out of the flue. It has a tripple wall 8" flue. I wanted a wood stove but the wife did not want it sittng in the room so the Sequoia Woodburng Fireplace was a good compromise.

    Jim Skeel
     
  20. TLC Flying

    TLC Flying TS Member

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    Been burning wood all my life. Thought I was through when the kids moved out. Remarried and started again. Logging truck load (12-14 cord) of tamarack was $1600 or so last year. Only saw and split in the fall when it is cool. Several things I have learned: 1. Keep the stove going 24 -7 (even slowly) and the room becomes the central heat source of the house (3500 ft or so). If you are starting a fire every day you lose the enthusiism and it is very seldom warm. 2. For fireplaces I always have sealed the opening and put a stove on the floor and ducted it through and to the top as stated above. With a stove no fans to circulate the heat and you get 360 degrees of convection. 3.SPLIT AND STACK YOUR WOOD IN THE FALL AS IT WILL BE A NESTING PLACE FOR INSECTS. 4. Do not bring your wood in until you burn it for the same reason. Warmth brings the insects out of hibernation. BW
     
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