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O.T.Wood burning stove health ??

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by southjblue, Dec 20, 2010.

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  1. southjblue

    southjblue Active Member

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    I am remodeling and considering to put in a wood burning stove---We went and got prices and almost bought one---My wife did some research on wood burning stoves on the net and came up with some info that the transfer of heat in the room is harmful to your health---Need opinions on this matter---Thanks---MYSTIC---
     
  2. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    What health issues are they talking about? I might add that the non transfer of heat to your home is pretty dangerous as well. Jeff
     
  3. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Wood burning stove health ??

    Just Google "breathing wood smoke". It is many times more harmful than cigarette smoke and stays in your body 40 times longer than cigarette smoke. A web search will answer ALL of your questions.

    Good luck,

    miltie
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    If you are breathing wood smoke from your stove you definitely have a problem.

    I have found that the nastiest heat source is an oil burner. Greasy deposits and stink all over the building.

    HM
     
  5. Dr A C Jones

    Dr A C Jones Member

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    There was something on the radio a couple of nights ago that stated that log burners for heating presented a cancer risk from the ash. I haven't looked it up myself, but I guess it's because the log burners burn hotter than open fires (and also burn the wood like charcoal) and so generate finer ash. It's worth checking on. Everything has pros and cons. Gas might be cleaner, but get it wrong and blow up the house! Electricity is controllable but it's best not to make yourself part of the circuit. Etc . . .

    Once you understand the risks you can make a much better fist of dealing with them.

    Andrew.
     
  6. Bob Griffith

    Bob Griffith Member

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    I have been around wood stoves a large portion of my life & I can't think of any health danger from the heat transfer. Most stoves today have a tight firebox so all the combustion takes place in the fire box & there shouldn't be an leaking of smoke or other gases, except when door is open to fill it. Even during this process, if the chimney pipe is set up correctly, the vast majority will flow up the pipe from the extra draft created by the door being open. Also, I think stoves today are required to have a smoke re-burning system, somwhat similar to a catalytic converter, to reduce excess emissions & make the stove more efficient. Our stove is a Regency & it has a fan that blows room air up over the back & across the top & really puts out some heat. This air never comes in contact with the fire box as it moves strictly across the outside of the stove & draws off the heat being radiated. I suppose if a stove was not properly vented and allowed to smolder in excess you could get some carbon monoxide from it, but this is true of even a fuel oil or gas fired furnace.

    The single biggest concern is always the chance of a chimney fire. Burn good dry (seasoned) hardwood, clean chimney peridocally during heating season, don't let in too much air to allow stove to over heat (a stack thermometer is a great idea) and don't allow anyone to empty the ashes into a combustable container! This last 1 may sound just plain stupid, but trust me when I tell you that every year I read of someone who lost their house because they dumped the ashes in a cardboard box or a waste basket. There is just no cure for stupid! Also, make sure that whoever installs thie stove & chimney/pipe really knows what they are doing. Many insurance companies have strict specs in terms of distance from walls, tpe of pipe used, etc. Our insurance wanted to inspect the installation prior to the ceiling area being finished. May want to check with yours to be sure to be in compliance.

    Sorry for being long winded, but wood stoves tend to get a bad rap because people don't understand them. They are a wonderful tool, just like a firearm, when in the hands of someone that gives them the care & respect they deserve.
     
  7. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    That is just funny! The stove may put ash into the atmosphere but it doesn't put it in the house! I do not have forced air in my home and I dust once a week and the dust is the same ( less really) in the winter when my stove runs 24 hours a day from October through April. I have no idea how smoke from a wood stove would get inside somebodys house but then again there will always be people who shouldn't walk and chew gum.
    I guess I just know the magic trick of using a wood stove!

    Open the damper for 10 seconds before you open the door and give the stove some air. Up and away the flames go along with the smoke! It's called a vaccum! If you can't produce one then you are not smart enough to use a wood stove!

    Allow the power company to keep you warm and pay the bill. It's a very simple process either way you approach it! Good luck! Jeff
     
  8. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    how long you going to live???????? ask pat its your time its your time for get the F--- net gore is worried about GW I am moving his warming with a snow plow. tell wife to cut more wood
     
  9. Lou Braun

    Lou Braun TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I just finished adding some wood to the stove. No smoke smell or anything else, just good heat and the knowledge that the oil burner will not kick in for hours.

    Paying for heating oil is bad for one's financial health.

    Lou Braun
     
  10. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    You might consider a outside wood furnace..
     
  11. neofight

    neofight TS Member

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    Common sense, when applied, usually brings good results. Learn how to operate the stove, burn the right woods, maintain good seals on the door and stack and you are probably going to live to be 76.45 years old. Oh yes, clean the chimney once in awhile. Chimney fires are not fun!
     
  12. himark

    himark Well-Known Member

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    Someone should of warned the settlers that used it for there sole heat source and I am sure there fireplaces were not near as effeciant as todays firebox's. Seems you can die from about anything according to the foil hat club.
     
  13. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I am sure it's much safer to use electric heat and let everyone share the fumes from the power plant.

    Mystic, go outside and see if the transfer of heat is harmful to your health.

    How about a source, so we can all read it?

    HM
     
  14. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    nothing lights a good cigar better than the flame from a good wood burning stove. health issue? what health issue? good luck with it
     
  15. lostandout

    lostandout Member

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    my wood stove is a enerzone and it runs 24-7 the only time that smoke can be seen is when im adding wood otherwise there is no smoke or smell coming from the stack the new stoves are a lot better than they were 10 years ago
     
  16. Duck Head

    Duck Head TS Member

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    I'd like to stick my chimney pipe up Al Gore's pipe and his croney's too. Wood smoke never hurt anybody and that business your wife heard is part of an indoctrination process against us subversive wood burners! Big Al can't make a buck off of my free firewood that's the problem! I'd like to give that plastic faced clown a.....Well you fill it in.
     
  17. Taminator

    Taminator TS Member

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    Why not buy a coal stove? The Harmon stoves are quite capable of burning wood or coal. When you get tired of feeding wood start the coal fire. Two buckets of coal in 24 hours keeps most houses real cozy!
     
  18. DJM

    DJM Member

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    I'll bet the far greater health risk comes from making the firewood rather than burning it. My brother-in-law had 3 spinal surgeries in 14 months. We made a lot of firewood together. Lot's of heavy lifting involved, we will never know how much that contributed. I cut the top of my foot through my boot with a chainsaw when it kicked back. Not too bad just 7 stiches. I noticed that when I told the story someone else often had a "Topper" to my chain saw story. An uncle, in-law or neighbor they knew of had done mayhem with the power saw.
     
  19. HC_John

    HC_John TS Member

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    I'm going to jump on a high horse for a second.

    If your concerned about health issues for heat then move south where you don't need heat. Burning wood worked for my ancestors and didn't kill them anymore than anything else, so its just as good for me.

    John MI.
     
  20. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    Someone above mentioned free firewood. I would like some of that.

    Rick in Mt.
     
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