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O/T Teaching a daughter to drive

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by joe kuhn, Aug 29, 2010.

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  1. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    She's a smart kid, but has no experience behind the wheel. So we went out to farm country and drove 1 gravel road for a good half hour. This gave her experience driving in the right spot; not too close to the right edge, not in the other guys lane. The only way to learn this is to get into the grass and notice it. Gave me fits, but we went slow, so it was not problem except where the ditch was deep. Did fine at cross roads and looking both ways. She is truely a beginner and it will take alot before I'm comfortable with her safety.

    After going straight west for a half hour we came upon an old cemetary with very narrow entrances. Perfect. Darn near scratched the car, but missed. We went in and out of the cemetary alot until she was confortable. Good practice turning and staying on the road. As I said, she is a raw beginner.

    She started remembering her turn signals about this time. Another thing to teach her is to learn to be safe on your own accord. One time I said let's pull out onto the road and she just did it without looking both ways. I said stop and nobody was coming from the left, but we could have gotten clipped. Yikes. This kid is so inexperienced, it's frightening. But on we went. We're not giving up.

    About this time I wanted to visit a new shooting club out by Waterman IL, so we turned that direction and the guy in charge gave us a great tour of the place driving through fields and more gravel roads, stopping for gates to be opened, 3 point turn to back around, etc. His daughter has just learned to drive as well. At one point he said, so this is your very first day driving? Yep. Great experience for my kid in that we were all looking at the facility, but she was still in control of the car. Took the pressure off her, but she still had to do her job.

    My car won't let anyone in or out unless the shifter is in Park. Taught her that when our guide had to get out a time or two.

    Back to a different road going east and found there are some blacktop roads with no lines painted on them at all. She asked a good question about how do you know when to pass or not when there are no lines, and I said it's a judgement call and you have to know when it's safe to pass in front of a hill or not. She could see this...She slowed down to let oncoming cars go by on narrow roads, without going into the ditch too far.

    Hit another blacktop road with about a 55 mph speed limit. 40 mph is her top speed and we had quite a following before turning left with no oncoming traffic to get back to her grandma's house. Doesn't know to check the left mirror to be sure no body is passing before turning left. Turn signal was on so we made it back safe and sound, dad got to drive the rest of the way home. Will white board a safe left turn for her today.

    Big grin from her at the end of the day and made her boy friend jealous of all the driving time. 3 plus hours on the first day. She did well and learned alot and is gaining confidence. I'm also concerned about her itchy brother who is completely coordinated, but doesn't know the safe behaviors.

    I have my hands full I tell you.

    Joe
     
  2. no5shooter

    no5shooter Member

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    You sure do. I remember teaching my youngest to drive. Yikes indeed. Kid thought she could do anything, including fly. She made it, so did I, and she's a good driver today. Hang in and you'll both make it through.
     
  3. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    A man of courage, incite, and loving patience. Your the man......
     
  4. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    I took my daughter to a big empty high school parking lot on Sundays so she could learn how fast the car can accelerate, how long it takes to stop, parking, parallel parking, etc. I also had her drive some in reverse using the mirrors. Watch out for the light poles. Good luck, Wayne
     
  5. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    Yes, going backwards with mirrors. That's a great one.

    At one point I had her stop the car and 'goose it' so she could see what it took to spin the wheels in gravel. She's got to learn the feeling of being out of control in order to stay in control. At one point she said it feels like I'm going too fast and slowed down. She was going too fast for very loose gravel and her skill level. She's getting there.

    Hoping to get her onto a farm field with a frozen puddle so we can drive on ice. I like the empty parking lot idea alot. We can do that in town.

    How fast a car can accelerate is a good one too. We CAN fly, and stop in time.

    Thanks guys!

    I appreciate the encouragement and the ideas. When the homework is done, more driving.
     
  6. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    The Waterman, IL shooting facility for the Aurora Sportsman's Club looks good - 3 traps, but you've got to know how to get there. Main entrance at the North end is where the office is, the shooting is a drive around the country block to the other side and in. They bought 3 farms from 3 brothers and have built great rifle/pistol ranges of various lengths. They had Civil War guys out to shoot 8 pounders all morning and you could see the white markings on the grass from the firing. They hit a 100 yard target twice with their lead balls. Plenty of archery and skeet (just went up), 5 stand and that other game that's like hunting. Great conversation about the Olympics that didn't make it to Chicago because the US Olympic Committe wouldn't share enough of the TV income with the International Olympic Committee. This facility would have been expanded if Chicago had won the bid.

    Maybe my daughter and I can drive out there this Friday, do some shooting and drive back in the dark. It would be good practice for us both.
     
  7. Uncle Sam

    Uncle Sam Member

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    Joe...I had to laugh while reading your thread! I also think your experience would have been a good application for valium! Thank you for a good laugh!.....Uncle Sam, Pa.
     
  8. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    Teaching them to drive is a piece of cake compared to teaching them to be disciplined not to text message and chatter on the phone while driving. SIX dead friends since Oct '06 due to cell phone users. One was the Tipton County Sheriff and it was a young girl text messaging on a cell phone.
     
  9. Dougbbbb

    Dougbbbb TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Great story Joe

    I am going through the same thing now with my 16 year old daughter. It's times like these that I wish I still lived in the small town in PA instead of NJ. The only good thing is by next year she should be ready for the NASCAR circuit.

    Best of luck
    Doug
     
  10. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    Ah yes, what great memories. Crying,screaming,copious tears. The demon clutch finally humbled that stong willed teenage daughter of mine. Finally let her drive my faithful old Ford 8N tractor in a flat pasture and it taught her how to handle the demon and lowered my blood pressure. Her first car was a 5 speed Honda Civic and she loved it. Actually I did too.
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Member

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    Been there, did that. Did it with a 1 ton pick up with a stick shift. She didn't think it was fair to have to learn on a manual transmission, I told her the license allowed her to drive sticks so I wanted her to. She's grateful and I'm very proud. She now pulls our 37ft travel trailer and can back it into a tight spot if needed. No accidents or tickets 7yrs flying solo now. Mik
     
  12. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    I learned on a manual transmission farm tractor, so I taught my daughter to drive a farm tractor when she was about 12 (she's very short and couldn't reach the pedals until then). The first time she drove my truck, it was just backing up and re-parking on the parking pad at the barn. Then I let her drive down the 1000 yard driveway to the barn and park in our spot. Afte she had that down, I took her to the school parking lot on the weekend the first time I let her drive my truck. We practiced parking in a parking spot and driving around there. Once she had that down, I got her on the roads right around our house (we lived in a rural area).

    Both the tractor and the truck were automatic. She still doesn't drive a stick. But she is timid and still gaining confidence, so I'll wait to teach her that. I'm GLAD she's timid.

    She has gotten to the point where she drives to and from school in Seattle. If you've ever driven in Seattle, then you know that it's quite a feat...narrow streets with cars parked up and down both sides, very busy traffic, one way streets everywhere, and it's not a normal grid. She's looking at colleges in New York city. :-0
     
  13. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Taught my daughter to drive, beginning in a LARGE parking lot of a deserted shopping mall. When she was comfortable with the car, we went out on the road. Burned a tank of gas the first day. Second day she had the hang of it. One more great experience would be that same big open parking lot in the freezing rain and/or snow. She's been driving now for almost ten years, so I guess she got the hang of it. She lives in an area that gets a lot of ice and snow, so she got the practice in poor weather. I didn't need the valium, I've taught a bunch of females how to drive. Still trying to teach the current girlfriend, but she's had her license for over 30 years and won't listen anyway. :)
     
  14. OGC Director

    OGC Director TS Member

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    With 3 daughters of my own, I know what you are dealing with. All I can add is stay calm, they will learn. In my case, I had a lot of help. Plenty of brothers and sisters (Aunts & Uncles) to take them out on the road. Helped spread the stress around.

    Rich in Indiana
     
  15. Bob M

    Bob M Member

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    I started my daughter by teaching her how to back up (using her mirrors) and drive forward in the driveway in my Suburban. She was a bit intimidated by the size of the vehicle, but she learned.
     
  16. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Never had a daughter, but helped a couple of sons learn to drive.

    One thing I would recommend is after the snow falls this winter, take her to a pasture or empty parking lot someplace, and let her find out how much snow and driving on snow affects her car.

    Let her learn how to control a car when it goes into a slide. Let her learn how to drive like you have an very fragile egg under your gas pedal and under the brake pedal.

    When she learns these, it will help her tremendously when she has to apply those principals to every day driving.

    And what ever you do, tell her to always keep her eye out for trouble down the road. To many drivers are looking at about 20-30 yards ahead of them. Look way down the road and be aware. Aware of what the other drivers are doing...........or not doing.

    It's a jungle out there and you want your child to come home safe and sound.

    Good Luck! She will be driving you someday. And not just crazy! lol

    Hauxfan!
     
  17. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Joe

    One of the things you need to let them learn is...how does the car work? By that, I mean, mechanical stuff.

    For example, you know haw fast the car accelerates when you press "this far" on the pedal. And you know how hard the car brakes when you press "this hard" on the brake pedal. Because you've been doing it for 25 or 30 years. But she has to learn that. This can be done in the parking lot.

    Have her floor it from a dead stop for a few seconds.

    Have her get up to 30 mph and slam on the brakes.

    You know how close your car is to the car in front of you, but she has to learn that.

    You know how far the passenger side tires are from the curb, but she has to learn that.

    I had the advantage of a high school parking lot a few blocks from home.

    Other things you can teach in the parking lot:

    Parallel parking, with cones.

    How to make right turns and not have the rear tire hit the curb.

    When the parking lot has snow, get her out there and see just how slippery that stuff is.

    Good luck. Mine is now 21, and is a very diligent, safe driver. A little time and patience is what you need.

    One of the things I preached to my daughter is you must assume the other drivers are idiots, and are out to ram you, and its your job to avoid them. Its far, far better to anticipate, and avoid an accident, than to be in one, even if it was the other guy's fault.

    Oh, and spring for the $400 driver's ed class. She'll learn stuff in there you forgot you knew. The one we sent our daughter to did a good job (plus, it helped my credibility when she came home and said, "Dad, they're teaching us a lot of the same stuff you taught me.")
     
  18. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    I start them young on golf carts. Good foundation for controlling a vehicle.
     
  19. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    First accident already - she hit the basketball pole with the review mirror on my car. She went into the house and cried. Later I asked what she learned from it. "To use my mirrors." We noted it was ironic that she broke what she wasn't using.

    Then I asked what she would do without mirrors since ours is broken now and it might get frosted over with ice/snow. She said she would look (by turning her head). In my book she's doing great.

    Had her help clean up the glass and sent her off with her mother to the glass store with a piece of cardboard the size of the mirror. First they both went to the auto parts store for a price on a replacement part. Of course they don't have just the glass. The part is $110 + tax. Just the glass will be much less, of course. This is all part of the learning.

    I tried to get her back in the car right away, but she wouldn't have anything to do with it. Later in the evening she was willing to go back out.

    Thanks so much for all the ideas and the great stories. We're rolling.
     
  20. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    Coincidentally, we had a low time on the same car.

    I feel another training exericise with dad; changing a tire, on a gravel road with lots of gravel, at night, with no flash light.

    Never done it myself. This could get good.
     
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