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O/T Roof Ridge Vents

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by DJM, Feb 10, 2009.

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  1. DJM

    DJM Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Location:
    Central Minnesota
    My 10 year old house has the plastic roof ridge vents that you shingle over. My ceiling just started showing a water stain. We are experiencing the first thaw of the season here in MN. I went into the attic and discovered it was dripping through the 2" slot at the ridge under the vent. I went on the roof and found nothing wrong with the vent or shingles. But there was still snow piled atop the ridge vent. I'm wondering if the snow simply melted so fast it overflowed into the vent. Are these style vents in common use? Some one told me some codes do not allow them, is that true? Do I have any recourse other than climbing up on the roof if there is a heavy snow before it thaws to shovel the snow off the vents? If that is the case I think I will remove them, shingle the ridge closed and install the more common plastic hooded vents. Thanks for any help. Don Miller
     
  2. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Ridge vents actually offer great advantage over any other type of venting and end up saving you money on heating and cooling

    Most have some type of mesh as part of that cap

    So the very top of your house - the very tip of your roof is buried under snow? Other than that- I dont see how their would be any snow to melt that would get inside- plus it doesnt seem like the water could flow up the angle of the roof.

    Possibly the vent material wasnt shingled over properly at the lower edge of the material---

    Gene
     
  3. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    We used to use that type of shingle over vent years ago. it is made of coragated plastic like you woule see in a plastic cardboard box? We now use a roll vent? What is the pitch of your roof. i would think that if the roof snow is melting it would run away. I have seen pine needles blowing in and other small debris. There is a new er vent called a roll vent that has a closth type wrapper on it to stop the intrusion of items and debris from being blown in. We use the later version and do not have any problems with leakage. I feel that the roof may be a shallow pitch and tat is part of the problem. Also the coragated box type used to lift up at times i have seen that the nails would pull up and the plastic would expand and loosen the nails and cause it to lift . I wopuld cjhange the vent and try the newer style.
    Bob S
     
  4. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    WOW, looked at the post, hen pecking is not the best way to type I guess, Sorry. Bob S
     
  5. Lead Man

    Lead Man TS Member

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    Check the website above.
     
  6. jhoward

    jhoward Member

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    I saw quite a few of them while I was living in Florida, or course there are no snow concerns there. I've not noticed any here in Kentucky.

    If the water is dripping from the vents, you might be able to hang some sort of tray to catch the dripping water and allow it to evaporate. If the water is running down the surface of the roof sheeting I'm not sure what you could do for that.
     
  7. DJM

    DJM Member

    Joined:
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    519
    Location:
    Central Minnesota
    Yes, the very peak of the roof (gable style) still had up to 8" of snow covering the vents. And that was after a month of settling and some recent melting. We had 14" of snow on two events plus other scattered snowfalls during December. The roof pitch is 5/12. The vents were clean and free of any debris as viewed from both the attic and roof. The peak is almost 30' off the ground (two story)so it does not get too many leaves that high. Will check out the GAF web site suggested ASAP.
     
  8. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    Do you think that it can be condensation since the vents are incased in snow and ice? The plastic can transmit the cold thru and is tah attic cold ie. no major heat loss. no bath ventor anything. If the vents are snowed in it sounds like it could be a condensation problem. Bob S
     
  9. Shipbuilder

    Shipbuilder TS Member

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    Is there a crust of ice over the vent?

    I had this happen several years ago and there had been a lot of melting /refreezing and a couple of snow falls. The only thing I could figure out was that water was somehow getting trapped near the warmer roof vent during thawing, and the refreeze was forcing it in. Never did figure it out for sure.

    Jim
     
  10. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you had an "ice dam" form just below the ridge vent. Ice dams occur when you have melting of the snow underneath and then a refreezing of the melted snow to form ice.

    Then when it warms up later, the ice backs up the newly melted snow and it flows into your attic through the vent.

    The same thing can happen lower on the roof around the gutters if they get clogged with ice and then the snow above the ice starts to melt. In this situation, the water will back up under the shingles and saturate the sheeting and soak through that way. You will notice this by seeing water stains along the upper part of your outside wall on the INSIDE of the house.

    Easystreet
     
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