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O/T Reloading for .270 Winchester

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Bama73, Jan 3, 2013.

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  1. Bama73

    Bama73 Member

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    I am about to try my hand at reloading for my Ruger 270. I have loaded for shotgun and handguns, but never for a rifle. I have purchased a pound of Alliant RL19, CCI and Federal BR primers, and Hornady 130 grain SST bullets. These were reccomended by my local reloading shop and they shoot a lot of benchrest stuff. The biggest question I have is on a starting powder charge. After looking at my Hornady 8th edition, Sierra Edition 5, Speer number 13, and Alliant online reloading manuals, each one lists a different max charge for a 130 grain bullet. Sierra says 47.6-53.0, Speer 53.0-57.0, Hornady 50.6-59.4, and Alliant merely says 57.0 as a max.

    I don't have anyone local I know to mentor me on this, I learned the handgun stuff from my brother, but he has never attempted rifle loading. I have tried to read as much as I can from both the manuals and online, and many reccomend looking at various sources for data and cross checking them. This is where my question lies. What would be a good starting point based on those listings ? I plan to seat to standard length for now until I am more comfortable with the process and then I may try to adjust seating depth for better accuracy.

    I was going to do a ladder test loading one round in .5 grain increments and shooting them all to the same point of aim and looking for an accuracy node and further refining from there. Am I on the right track ? I have an RCBS rock chucker press and standard RCBS 270 dies, case trimmer, primer pocket uniformer, chamfer tool, and Mitutoyo calipers. Any help on this venture would be greatly appreciated. I am not a member at any of the rifle type forums, but I do feel comfortable asking here.
     
  2. TD1958

    TD1958 Member

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    Good choice. I did the very same thing. I loaded (5) rounds in .5 increments untill I found what the rifle liked for accuracy. Good luck, Tim
     
  3. Beni

    Beni Member

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    Apr 21, 2009
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    HI, I would start mid range of grain weight and work up to max or where u are comfortable with your group. You should really shoot 3 -5 shots per load from the bench. Make sure your gun is either bore sighted or buy some factory 130 gr to get on paper at 100 yds. Dont worry about hitting the x on every load you are just trying to get the tighest group on paper,when you choose a load to stick with then zero your gun. Have fun,the crazy thing is we buy all these different components spend all that money and settle on 1 load. beni
     
  4. Bill Bauer

    Bill Bauer TS Member

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    Since I live fairly close to the Hornady factory and use a lot of their products I've been through their facility a couple of times and can assure you they are first rate. Since you have their 130 gr bullets and reloading manual use their recommendations and start from the bottom and work your way from there. Each rifle is different so you're on the right track. Good luck.
    Bill
     
  5. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    It's been a while since I've looked, but the later editions of the Nosler manuals have an excellent section on reloading techniques/methods. I imagine Hornady, Sierra, etc do too.

    I'm assuming you have a scale. Use the manual appropriate for your bullets (i.e. Hornady for Hornady). Try to use the components listed (i.e. Winchester brass if they use Winchester). Start no higher than the medium load listed, maybe even below that. Set up your sizing die to neck size only. You'll need two tools -

    1) A micrometer to measure the base diameter of the case;

    2) A caliper to measure case overall length.

    If your case overall length gets to the maximum listed for the cartridge you'll need to trim the cases to 0.01" under. For the .270 Winchester my Nosler 5th Edition gives 2.540"

    Measure the diameter of the base after the initial firing. The measurement should be taken in a consistent position. For the .270 I would do it with the edge of the micrometer placed just forward of the extractor groove. With a belted case like the 7mm Remington Magnum, I'd do it just forward of the belt. The measurement should be close to what the manual declares (Nosler 5th says 0.473"). As you work up your loads, this measurement should stay the same. When it starts growing by 0.001" or more, you've reached maximum - stop increasing the charge. Another sign of high pressure is that the primers will start to go in easier when you reload. This is easy to tell with a hand priming tool, but harder if you are inserting them with a press. A real bad sign is sticky extraction from your rifle after firing. Your loads are way too hot - back off!

    When I first started reloading nearly fifty years ago, I used a Speer reloading manual that listed a maximum load of 72 grains of 4831 for their 160 grain bullet in the 7mm Remington Magnum. I got very sticky extraction, so backed off to 70 grains. Given the date, I assume they were using H4831, but it didn't specify. Later editions of the manual list the maximum load with that bullet as 60 grains of IMR 4831. I wonder how many rifles were blown up using the original load. I know my case life wasn't great at 70 grains of H4831, but it was very accurate and flat shooting!
     
  6. SPW895

    SPW895 Member

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    You might want to check to see if the different manuals are using the same brass, primers, and or bullets. They all make a difference. For the 270 Win I like to use 59.0 gr of H4831 with Rem 9-1/2 primers and Sierra or Nosler 130 gr bullets with Win brass. A good resource for reloading information is PET LOADS by Ken Waters. It should be available thru Wolfe Publishing This manual has a lot of good information. Older Lyman manuals from the 70's and 80's were good at listing accuracy loads also
    One thing I noticed is that Sierra and Nosler normally lists accuracy and good Hunting loads in their data and are good places to start. Use their exact combination of bullets, primers, brass, and powder. It is best not to start out with a accuracy load or hunting load that is at the top end of the loading data(max pressures).
    I also have Speer and Hornady reloading manuals but wished they gave me a starting point for accuaracy loads.
    You may already have a internal primer deburring tool, use it as helps insure accuracy.

    Stan
     
  7. C-Money

    C-Money Member

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    I use the RL-19 powder in my 270win as well. works great. 55gr of RL-19 with a 140 Nosler Accubond. That load works great in my rifle, and many deer and elk have filled the freezer over the years using it. You are for sure on the right track. .5gr increments and you will be in business. 270wins usually are not to picky. I am using the Nosler reloading book.
     
  8. HTSmith

    HTSmith Active Member

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    You are on the right track. I've been reloading the 270W for 30 years or so. I'd put the most trust in the Hornady data. Sierra tends to be overly conservative. The bullet has the most influence on accuracy. My current 270 loves plain old 130 Gr Hornady flat bases--won't shoot the sexy SST's worth a darn. I've had the best luck with IMR and H4831, but R19 is right in that range and should work fine.

    I would suggest a flash hole deburrer as there is often a big burr inside the brass case from punching the flash hole. I'd also suggest a lee collet neck sizer. I use the lee for 2 sizings and then full length resize on the 3rd. The brass lasts longer that way.

    PM me if you have further questions. Good shooting!
     
  9. TRAINWRECK

    TRAINWRECK TS Member

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    I have reloaded this round for 25+ yrs and the best power is 4831. I also like win mag primers, remington brass and 140gr spire point boattail bullets. I have loaded for the rem 700, browning a-bolt, ruger bolt and a few mod 70's. The rems and abolts was able to produce 100 yrd 5 shoot groups that you can cover with a dime. Take your time and build a good safe load. This one of the best white tail rounds out there.
     
  10. Bama73

    Bama73 Member

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    Thanks for all the sugestions guys. I have my brass resized, deprimed, primer pockets cleaned, flash holes de-burred, and it's in the tumbler getting any metal shavings out now. I think I will start at 50 grains and load up to 60 grains in .5 grain increments. I doubt I reach the last shells as I will be looking for pressure signs on each load. I think I will load 5 of each and shoot them in a rotating manner on a set or targets until all are shot and try to get a good group from one hopefully. Again thanks for the help, and I'll report how the groups go.
     
  11. HTSmith

    HTSmith Active Member

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    I wouldn't go with a powder charge lower than what is recommended in a manual--there can be pressure issues with too light loads of slow burning powder. You are not likely to get a very uniform velocity until you at least get to the mid range loads, so I'd only load one round for pressure check with the light loads. 10% less than the recommended max is generally a plenty safe place to start.
     
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