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O/T Reloading .45 ACP

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Mike K P, Dec 21, 2007.

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  1. Mike K P

    Mike K P Member

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    I've reloaded thousands of shotgun shells over the years and recently have been thinking of reloading for my 1911 .45 ACP. For some reason it makes me a little nervous to try. Is it more difficult and or dangerous? How about set up costs? Any information at all would be appreciated. Thanks, Mike Pracht.
     
  2. harleypilot

    harleypilot Member

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    Hi Mike,

    It's not hard at all. I started by just reading one or two of the books on reloading. I had a simple press to start with and then bought a Dillon Square Deal B. It works great and is very easy to use. Can load a few hundred an hour with this, and its backed by Dillon for life.

    Have fun,
    Jim
     
  3. harleypilot

    harleypilot Member

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    Sorry forgot to address your question about cost. The last I looked the Square Deal B was about $250 set up for any one calibre. That includes the dies and everything except components.

    Jim
     
  4. Bridger

    Bridger Member

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    The .45ACP is about the easiest metallic cartridge to reload. Metallic reoading is not particularly difficult but you do have to keep your mind in the game. Double charges can happen if you don't watch what you are doing as so little powder is used. In my opinion the Dillon loaders are the best and backed by a company that gives fantastic customer support. You will need a press, dies, scale, calipers and of course brass, powder and bullets. You will also need a tumbler and cleaning media to clean brass and probably a few other things. Go to Dillons website and you can see what it will cost as they have all the stuff or just call one of their support staff. You will save a bunch over the cost of factory ammo and you will recover your setup costs over time depending on how much you shoot.
     
  5. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    Mike, I just got back into metallic reloading after about 30 yrs. or so. Go to the Dillion Precision website and find their "forum" section. Anopther good forum to visit is Brianenos.com. Good folks, great reading on reloading just about everything. They have technical info and someone can answer about any question you have. You could do a search on .45 cal. reloading and find other areas to visit also. Good luck, have fun.

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  6. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    I did just what you are planning. Started with shotshells, then added 45 ACP. Buy a metallic reloading book and read. There are recipe manuals just for the 45. You need calipers and a primer flip tray in addition to the scale you already have. Unless you are going to load only new brass, you need to buy case cleaning equipment (a timbler and media). You can buy 45 ACP reloading DVD's from the online reloading websites. I bought a DVD 18 months after I started reloading 45's and still learned stuff from the DVD. One of the most useful tools to have is a case checker. You can use the barrel of your gun as a case checker, but its worth buying one.

    Buy a Dillon 550, and you can add calibers in the future. If price is the primary factor, the square deal can't be beat. Although the 550 doese not require you to lube the cases, using some One shot lube will dramatically improve the loading process. You will save money, a lot more than with shotshell reloading.

    And it really isn't that hard.
     
  7. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    Most of my ammo is 45ACP loaded on a Dillon 550 progressive press. It's less hassle than loading shotshells. The important thing to know is that cartridge reloading is not shotshell reloading, and you need to read up on it first. I recommend the Speer #14 handloading book because it has a very good explanation of the process.

    Since you'll need to cycle your auto reliably, don't make a lot of shells initially. Make a few and verify reliability. The key factors for reliability are OAL (overall length, as determined by bullet seating depth), and taper crimp, which should be slight.

    Also, never use Amerc brand brass. Just throw it away. I stick with the big name brass companies, and particularly favor Remington and Starline.

    If you're shooting cast bullets, it's also a lot cheaper than loading shotshells.
     
  8. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I'll only confirm what most have said. I used the Dillon 550B that was capable of loading all the rifle and handgun metallic cartridges. I selected that model so I could load .38, .357, .45ACP, .30 Carbine, .257 Ackley, and 7mm Rem. Mag. all on one platform. If you know you'll only be loading the .45ACP or any other single handgun cartridge, the Square Deal B is all the loader you'll need for quite a bit less than my choice.....breakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
  9. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    Questor brought up a great point.

    The first time I reloaded .45 I loaded up about a hundred rounds to start with and not one of them would fit into my chamber.

    Ooops!

    Start with just a few and check them out in your gun.
     
  10. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    Mike P: Winchester 231 is still very much around, and it's still my favorite for the .45 ACP. I just bought another jug of it. Mike: I agree with the above, metallic reloading saves a bunch of money, & although you need to pay attention to some details, is pretty simple. There was a thread a couple of weeks back, 12/3/-12/5/07 called metallic reloading, with lots of good tips. See if this link works: http://www.trapshooters.com/cfpages/threads.cfm -Phil E
     
  11. Inspector 12

    Inspector 12 TS Member

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    Don't know what powder you are using to reload your shotgun shells, but I find that Clays works well with a 230 grain bullet for 45 ACP. Clean and accurate out of all four of the 45's I own.

    As noted, in this case it is still considerably cheaper to reload than buy factory ammo.
     
  12. trappermike

    trappermike Well-Known Member

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    I tried loading .45 and found that quite a few of the cases were bulging on one side, apparently from a bullet getting cocked and not going in straight. Obviously, these would not chamber. Any ideas on how to prevent that? I am off over Christmas, (Xmas) for some of you, and would like to try again.

    Merry Christmas,
    Mike
     
  13. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    No Accurate No 5 powder users? I started off with Universal Clays, switched to Accurate No 5 on the advice of a friend. I have about a pound left, and will be resupplying sometime in the near future. I have clays and longshot on hand as well.

    No complaints with the No 5., and I have gradually worked up to the upper third of the recipe without any sign of pressure overload. I am not doing chrono and accuracy work with the loads at this time, and I just use it to hurl stuff down range cheaply, which favors keeping everything the same. But since the basics of 45 reloading have been covered fairly well, how about the finer points?
     
  14. oz

    oz Active Member

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    whatever powder you use for 12 ga you can most likely use for .45. just check a manual. oz
     
  15. trappermike

    trappermike Well-Known Member

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    PerazziBB, I load .380 auto, 38 special, .357 magnum, and 9mm and have no problems. I inspect each fired casing under a lighted magnifying glass after it has been cleaned in the tumbler. I adjust according to the manual and the way I do on all of the other calibers. I am missing something on the .45. I have been loading the other calibers for six or seven years, probably 2-3000 a year and have not had a problem. I am about to give up on .45 unless I get some help with the bullet causing bulges during the loading operation.

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  16. DJM

    DJM Member

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    One more vote for the Dillon Square B. If you are pretty sure you will not reload another caliber contact Chuck H. above for his used one. They are a bit expensive to add another caliber and will not reload your rifle rounds.

    My # 1 safety tip is to be on the alert for a round with no powder. Double charges can be a big problem but I have never had one (I was aware of). I have had a few with no powder over the years. Most often the primer charge will not drive the bullet far enough into the barrel to allow another round to be chambered. But if it does and you drop the hammer look out. Each time you pull the trigger there needs to be a loud bang and some recoil. If not stop and check for obstructed barrel.
     
  17. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    Mike - any chance you can get a photo of the bulged cases posted? It is not inherent to the 45, so there has to be something else going on.
     
  18. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Mike,

    It sounds like the problem is with the bullet seating die or the bullets. Take the die apart and check that nothing is is bent. Also mike the bullets and make sure they are round and the correct diameter. HMB
     
  19. harleypilot

    harleypilot Member

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    Mike,

    I would suggest you buy Chuck's Square Deal B. Dillon will stand behind that reloader forever no matter who owns it.

    If you think you might start loading rifle calibres by the hundreds, then you should probably get a 550.

    Jim
     
  20. Mike K P

    Mike K P Member

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    Lots of great information and I really appreciate it. Sounds like I need to do some reading first but this really helped. Chuck I may take you up on that Dillon but I'll have to wait until after Christmas if I do. thanks.
    Mike.
     
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