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O/T: Metallic Reloading

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Sam (ATA Noobie), Dec 3, 2007.

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  1. Sam (ATA Noobie)

    Sam (ATA Noobie) Member

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    Hello all!

    A few weeks back I purchased a .44mag knowing full well the cost of ammo is ridiculous and is only getting higher. I also shoot a .308 G3

    I reload shotshells (Use a 9000G) so I'm no stranger to relaoding in general.

    I was wondering what equipment I'd need or want to get started to do a low volume of reloading. Also, what about the kits out there (Lee has a cheap one), etc.

    Any info would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Sam
     
  2. ccw1911

    ccw1911 Member

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    Sam, you can't go wrong with a RCBS Rockchucker single stage press, Lyman also makes a good one. Either one will last a lifetime and will load just about any caliber you want. I can't say the same about the other brand.
     
  3. magnumthunder

    magnumthunder Member

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    I Started with a RCBS press, Scale and Dies for loading .44s. NOTE! Started with!! Been adding ever since (by chioce) Thinking about casting bullets also! Going to start reloading 40s&w and .45s. But that will be in the progressive way! I enjoy all reloading!

    You can get by with a press,scale, shell holder, and carbide dies for starters. But I would also recommend a good book also.

    You can get kits at a good price that would have everything you need to get started too.
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    If you want to have shiney cases you will need a tumbler and media. If you want your cases to be the same length you will need a case trimmer. If you want your primer pockets to be clean you will need a tool for that job. Depending on what press you get you might need to get a primer seater. It's nice to have a go no go guage to see if your finnished rounds will fit in the chamber of your pistol. HMB
     
  5. rjdden

    rjdden TS Member

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    I started with the LEE Classic but have gone on to the Lee Turrett press. It makes things so much easier. To go to another caliber just remove the turrett and replace it with the one you are going to. You don't have to make adjustments to the dies all the time. Rich.(inPeorial,A.Z.)
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Lee makes great stuff for starting out, and they're priced for the "intro to metallic reloading" folks. If you never get TOO deep into it, Lee products may last a lifetime.

    Get a couple of reloading manuals. Lyman is good. Lee's handbook is good reading too.

    Absolutely, positively, get a reliable scale.

    Look on the internet for used presses and dies. I just got an older (no longer made) Lyman press from someone on this forum for a good price. Works perfectly, and will probably outlast me.
     
  7. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    BTW, Sam, will you be coming to the Shootout at the Crossroads in March (8th & 9th)? Hope so!

    Working already to make it better than 2007!
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I have been using a rjock Chucker for so long, they now cost twice what I paid!

    You need a powder measure. The RCBS model has 2 different inserts for varying size dumps, and changing inserts is easy. Don't waste time with a cheap measure, consistency is important in metallic reloading. A tenth of a grain can sometimes make a difference. With shotshells, a half grain usually is needed to change anything materially.

    A good scale should already be in your stuff if you reload ANYTHING. For metallic you shold be 1/10 grain accurate.

    Carbide dies are good because you don't have to be so fussy with your cases. If you have regular dies you can put a scratch in one if there is a piece of metal on the brass. From there on all your cases might be deformed.

    Many pistol guys go on to high volume reloading setups for obvious reasons. But if you get a rock chucker it will last your lifetime and should you sell it it will bring better value than a cheapie.

    Reloading and shooting has been a 30 year tar baby for me. Just can't seem to get out of it.

    HM
     
  9. Sam (ATA Noobie)

    Sam (ATA Noobie) Member

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    Thanks for all the information, fellas.

    The only time I usually shoot my rofles/pistols is when we don't have trap/skeet practice during the winter and hunting season(s). So I don't need, nor can I afford any high-volume shooting.

    .44 special is AWFULLY hard to come by other than online, and then shipping kills it. Most of my shooting is plinking and I don't need a 240gr. bullet to kill a pop can.

    The .308's are for a Spanish CETME, not a precision instrument by any stretch of the word, so it allows me a little leeway.

    I'd guess 3-400 rounds a year (each caliber), is it still worth my while to reload? Seems hard to resist with the lee kit being $90 or so.

    What about digital scales? I've always kind of wanted one anyways. My Hornady scale does go to 1/10th of a grain though.

    Timb99: Most likely, as I get to as many shoots as I can. Can you e-mail me with the details?

    Thanks again all,

    Sam
     
  10. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Sam,

    From your previous posts it sounds like you like that .44 a lot and probably want to shoot the heck out of it. I would strongly consider the Dillon 550 as a new loading tool. This machine will make quality ammo in short order and it is a vesatile machine with a short learning curve. The single stage presses do make good ammo but it is a lot of work to make a couple of boxes of shells.

    There is a considerable cost difference between the Dillon and a typical single stage set up and if you can't quite swing the more expensive tooling right now then go ahead and pick up one of the LEE packages. The LEE dies and scale will continue to be useful if and when you get into the Dillon.
     
  11. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Sam,

    MidwayUSA has a nice electronic scale. Smaller than the palm of your hand. Very nice to use.

    On sale right now for $24.99
     
  12. Sam (ATA Noobie)

    Sam (ATA Noobie) Member

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    Just browing around and found this:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=525658&t=11082005

    Lee also has a 'load master' that looks very similar. The only thing I could see is that maybe the 1000 series can't do rifle calibers? (.308) For a little more money, it seems like the progressive kits are the way to go. But I'd like to keep it under $200 total.

    Thanks again (again).
     
  13. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    Sam:

    Years ago I started with the Rockchucker kit from RCBS. I have never once regretted it and have been very satisfied with all aspects of this kit. If you are looking to dabble with a lower entry cost, the Lee stuff will work, but beware of the practially unusable powder measure and untrustworthy scale. I have had some Lee equipment and have found it to be of inferior quality. You can make good use of some Lee equipment, like the press and dies, but spend extra on a better scale and powder measure.
     
  14. Roger IL

    Roger IL TS Member

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    Buy an RCBS press. If you don't you will wish you did. You don't need a Rockchucker the smaller press will serve you well. The Hornady balance scale will do just fine, put the money into the press and carbide or similar dies so you don't have to lube to resize. ........Roger
     
  15. Church Key

    Church Key TS Member

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    I suggest the standard Lee 4-Hole turret at about $65 with a set of Lee dies. Once you have the die set up in the turret done, you just pop the turret on/off and change the shell holder, a 1 minute operation. Single stage presses are a pain to use because of the requirement to constantly change dies.

    That said, I now use a Dillon 550B for 1/2 dozen calibers. It's worth it if you reload 1K+ rounds a month. For 1K a year, the Lee is fine.
     
  16. hairy

    hairy TS Member

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    Sam, you maybe have already done this, but if not...go to ebay and type in 'reloading press'. You can browse all afternoon on what comes up.
     
  17. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    ohio
    I have these for sale if anyone is interested.

    RELOADING DIES RCBS 9MM Luger carbide------44Mag--------38 special{one missing}

    Hornaday ----- 38 special #12

    LYMAN --- 30-30 Winchester-----44 special, 44 mag

    20 dollars a set including shipping. individual pictures before the sale recommended
     
  18. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    Reloading handgun cartridges is definitely worthwhile. You may find that because you have a bucket full of ammo that cost you $8 a box instead of $18, you will do more handgun shooting. A dillon square deal, if you are absolutely sure you are going to only load one caliber. Its not much more money to get a Dillon 550, then you can change it over to other calibers. Case tumber, quality scale, primer flip tray, calipers, and you are set.

    At the rate of 8 boxes a year, it's really not a financial decision, but if you enjoy shotshell reloading, you will enjoy handgun reloading. Go with a progressive press, like the Dillon 550, and if you decide it is not worth it, you can sell the press and not be out that much. If you do like it, you will be glad you have the Dillon 550.
     
  19. Sam (ATA Noobie)

    Sam (ATA Noobie) Member

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    I'm going to be loading two calibers.

    .308 and .44 spc/mag

    I think I have some reading to do on the process before I understand everything. It seems a lot less straight foward than shotshell reloading.
     
  20. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    Sam,

    Metallic is much more complicated than shotshell BUT the rewards are much greater too. You save far more loading metallic than you do at shotshells. You can load a MUCH better metallic than you can buy.

    I am with the people who have said buy a kit. It is the easy way to get started. It doesn't matter much which brand you buy. We all think the brand we use is the best and everybody should use what we use. If any of them were really bad they wouldn't be in business and if any of them were clearly the best they would drive the others out of business. They are all good and basically you get what you pay for.

    Load um up and have fun but be careful. Mistakes in metallic loading are usually REALLY serious.

    jim brown
     
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