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O/T Metallic ? O/T Tumbling media ? O/T

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by locdoc, Jan 2, 2009.

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  1. locdoc

    locdoc Member

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    Location:
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    What do you metallic reloaders find to be the better tumbling media? Corn cob or walnut shells? The cost of the two are so close that I'd opt for the more efficiant product. Or, maybe there is some other option or product. TIA

    Doug Whiton, P/W dealer/dist
     
  2. les morgan

    les morgan TS Member

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    In my experience walnut shells will clean harder if you have some really dirty brass but will not get as bright of a shine as corncob. I use both depending on the condition of the brass. For a polish to add to the media I usually use Dillon or Midway. Many polishes will work but I have read many places to avoid any that contain ammonia. Ammonia is reported to cause the brass to become brittle. You can get walnut at any pet supply. Sold as reptile bedding. Pet supplys have corncob also but it is too coarse. As the above poster said, corncob is at the sandblasting supply store. They usually have different size grits. Most use 12/20 but some use a finer grit. I also use an Ultra-Vibe 18 and an hour or two is usually good with clean media and good polish additive. Most people cut up a dryer sheet into about 1 1/2" squares and put it in with the media and brass. The dryer sheets cut down on dust, and absorb a lot of the dirt making the media last much longer. Use a new dryer sheet each time of course, the cheapest non sented kind is my choice.
     
  3. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Walnut shells leave a coat of dust on the brass so I always use corn cobs.
     
  4. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Being a long time reloader, I use walnut hulls if the condition of the brass warrants it. Then finish with corn cob.

    If loading bottleneck cartridges which must be lubed before resizing, and the lube removed after resizing, I use walnut hulls on them before sizing, and corn cob to remove the lube and polish the cases.

    For pistol cases which will be run through a carbide sizer, I only use the walnut if the hulls are stained, then corn cob to polish them.

    Having once been in the business of reloading ammo commercially, I like my reloads to look and function like factory.
     
  5. Dednlost

    Dednlost Member

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    Use corn cob but first condition it by taking a spoonful of Mothers chrome polish and heating it the microwave until its just liquid. Add this to the corn cob media as it tumbling and allow it to mix for an hour until all the clumps are gone. Your brass will absolutely knock your eyes out. I got this from a long time reloader after admiring his shiny brass for years and he finally let me in on the secret and now you know.
     
  6. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    PetSmart lizard litter with a cap full of Nu-Finish car POLISH (not the wax). Brass comes out looking much better than factory new. More like jewelry.
     
  7. locdoc

    locdoc Member

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    Location:
    Antrim, NH
    All good info. Many thanks.

    Doug Whiton, P/W dealer/dist
     
  8. AJKohler

    AJKohler Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    For really, really bad cases (.45ACP that have been buried forever, rifle cartridges fired with BP and the like), nothing beats ceramic with solution. The ceramic beads are very small angle-cut cylinders (non-abrasive), and the solution is essentially a dishwashing soap, diluted. The greatest problem with this is that it is a HEAVY mix and won't even begin to work in a vibrator; you need a tumbler, and preferably a heavy-duty one. But cases that wouldn't even begin to come bright with either walnut shells or corncob will shine like new with ceramic, and the beads work forever.

    I keep all three on hand and use them as is appropriate.

    Tony
     
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