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O/T internet ROUTER for multiple computers

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by new loader, Oct 13, 2007.

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  1. new loader

    new loader Member

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    I need to hook up another computer to this internet connection, and I understand the equipment I need to do the job is a router. I have a broadband modem. Both Dell computers, one uses XP, the other Vista. What should I look for? Wired? Wireless? I can run a cable between them, no problem. How much BS involved? What is your experience? Thank you.
     
  2. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    If your computers are going to stay in one place all the time there's no need for a wireless router. A hard wired unit will do fine. Either way routers are inexpensive and simple to setup, just follow the directions.


    Eric
     
  3. perazzitms

    perazzitms TS Member

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    You can get a router or a wireless router.

    Wireless routers will function as both. I bought a wireless router from Circuit City for $50 after rebates. You plug your modem into the router, and you can plug 4 LAN cables into the back of it and out to the LAN port in your desktop, or if you have a laptop with wireless (either internal or through a PC card)it will send the signal to all such computers you allow it to.

    There's really nothing to it. Windows will figure out the network on its own.
     
  4. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Pick a wired router with a built-in Gigabit Ethernet switch. All of them will have NAT (Network Address Translation), but make sure it also has SPI (Statefull Packet Inspection).
     
  5. omahasportingsupply

    omahasportingsupply TS Member

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    Make sure you turn on the security if you go wireless. Many people can surf the INTERNET off their neighbors wireless if they don't turn the security on. Cable modem > to input of switch/hub/router > 4 jacks for output connect with RJ45 cables > to individual computers. Usually hard wired is faster than wireless but may not be a valid point depending on the speed of the broadband connection.
     
  6. new loader

    new loader Member

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    What about the wireless N, G, or A equipment? I suppose G is what I need? So a wired router is wired, period. But a wireless can be either wired OR wireless. Sounds like perazzitms' advice is what I want to accomplish.
     
  7. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Wireless G is best right now. N is not settled or finalized as a standard yet. You should wait with that until it is. You might end up with non-upgradable hardware. A good four port wireless router should suit your needs. You can usually disable the wireless if you don't plan on using it. Wired is best for security and if the machines are stationary, the best way to go. I'd definitely buy the Wireless Router, since the wireless can be disabled. The cost is almost the same with, or without. SPI is a good thing as well as a firewall. Go to www.NewEgg.com and get an idea what there is. They sell quite a few at a reasonable cost. You can go do a search on Pricegrabber.com or Pricewatch.com if you find a model you like.
     
  8. new loader

    new loader Member

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    bobdog: Believe me, I want this to be as simple as possible. I thought I could just go to the store & buy a router. But when I got there, they had about 20 different models. That's when it got complicated. So now all you guys have helped me sort through the BS and I have a better idea what I should be looking for. Will search the Sunday paper today for sale items. Thanks to all.
     
  9. SShooterZ

    SShooterZ Member

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    Get a $50 - $60 Linksys unit and you should be good to go.

    Very simple to setup and should meet all your needs.
     
  10. rosies dad

    rosies dad Member

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    Get the cheap Belkin from Walmart. Its 802.11g, wireless or wired, 4 port. They sell the laptop receivers for wireless too. Available everywhere.
     
  11. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    I have a Linksys WRT54G...real simple to set up and works great!

    Wireless and up to 4 hard wired computers.
     
  12. mercedesman1981

    mercedesman1981 TS Member

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    SBray,

    Actually, what you have will work fine, there are a couple of things at play in this thread.

    With three computers hanging off your modem, what you have most likely is a built-in 4-port switch. This is fine if you do not need any additional ports for other computers or printers. Each computer is probably assigned its address from a configured pool of addresses. This is a default configuration. Your modem is most likely much more than just a modem, it has a switch and it routes to the internet for those addresses it does not know about.

    SPI - stateful packet inspection is a firewall term. Firewalls will keep track of the "state" of each connection from the internet to your computer. Some new routers are doing some of this on a limited basis. Yours may or may not be doing this, it just depends with what AT&T is selling at the moment.

    Were I to use AT&T hardware, I would have a software firewall installed on my computer, something a little more robust than the microsoft product.

    As for wired or wireless, If you buy wireless, I highly recommend you buy the router and the adapter cards for you computer from the same company. There may be standards, but for best performance/fewest headaches will be found using the same brand.

    Wireless is not all its cracked up to be, if you have the choice, definitely go wired.

    Mike

    PS - In real life, I am an network/security admin and have done much of the design work for my employer for our network.
     
  13. Jerbear

    Jerbear TS Member

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    I'm impressed... a thread that went all the way through and no smart ass remarks. I too am a fan of wired routers, I have 7 computers and a server running on a Motorola Surfboard 5100,Linksys BEFSR41 uplinked to a Cisco Systems WS-C1900 24 port switch. I can add puters as needed. It's easy when I have to plug into the net with a sick box. Plug in boot up and am now on the net for updates.


    Here's one I couldn't fix... so sad... People a can of compressed air will be your friend!!! Remember a clean computer is a happy computer.

    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>


    Jerbear
     
  14. omahasportingsupply

    omahasportingsupply TS Member

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    Jerbear.... In Nebraska we call that picture a small farm!


    Steve, A lot of good advice has been given on this thread. Most people make the mistake of getting way to complicated with no need for it. Most ISPs will only give you 10 meg bandwidth on the download side and about 10% of the download speed is all you get on upload side. I have several computers running on 10 NIC cards with no drop off in performance. Your won't even probably touch the limits of the 100 meg cards let alone the gigabit bandwidth. Wireless is great if you want to walk around the house with a laptop. If not used, (like other threads stated), shut it off so one of your neighbors doesn't log in and use your bandwidth. In my old neighborhood, I would log in on my neighbors wireless if my wife was hogging my bandwidth. My new neighbor is the IT manager for a ConAgra division so he not only has several T1s into his house, he has his wireless on stealth so it cannot even be seen. Firewalls can be hardware or software. Most routers have a firewall built in so the router accepts the IP number from the ISP. It then assigns numbers to the switch for your other machines but hides all the requests to the Internet behind the router's IP. Firewall can be software and both kinds can be run at the same time. I wouldn't depend on most Microsoft products. Other threads have had good suggestions. Hope this helps. Love the suggestion on the password. When I worked tech support, most passwords were taped to the monitors!!!!!!! GO Figure. Your IP may vary. Omaha
     
  15. new loader

    new loader Member

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    Update: Installed the router today, easy as pie. Bought the Linksys model at Best Buy, although it was $10 more than the same Netgear model. Followed the CD instructions and up & running in about 40 minutes. Thanks to all, I was able accomplish the mission.
     
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