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O/T Hunting Dog Choice Pointer or Flusher

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Bruce Specht, Aug 14, 2008.

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  1. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Well this should mix things up. For those of you that bird hunt which is the type of dog you prefer? I've hunted over labradors for thirty plus years they hunt close work hard and I don't spend time searching for a far ranging dog as I hunt on foot. What's your choice and why? Tron Kitty can not be included sorry canine only.
     
  2. emm2

    emm2 Member

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    I hunt with both a lab and shorthair. When my shorthair loses his mind I still have my lab in close. That said if I was choosing one, I would go lab or other close working flusher. I'm thinking about a pointing lab since my lab is 12 years old.
     
  3. Dove Commander

    Dove Commander TS Member

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    Pointers. Tough to beat an experienced, well trained pointer.
     
  4. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    English Springer Spaniel field trial bred dog. Best upland bird dog for pheasant and quail. Will work fine for ducks in moderate weather. Good companion and good with kids... the right size. They work in close and once trained - they stay trained. Fred
     
  5. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

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    Only two kinds of dogs, Labs and STUPID. This is a quote from an old trainer at Dunns in Union City years ago.
    I've had 'em all and I think he just might be right.
     
  6. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    Nothing beats a pointer (or setter) with a tail pointing to the sky waiting for you to come up and reward him with a kill and which they retrieve gingerly to hand. Repeat. They can also do this all day for 5 days straight.

    Never owned a flusher, figured if I had to walk over all the same ground that I don't have that amount of time. This being said, your cover and game chased should also dictate your choice. They will all make good companion if you will treat them as such.
     
  7. jagrdawger

    jagrdawger TS Member

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    Pointers, specifically versatile hunting dogs. I have owned/hunted over both and definitely know which I prefer.

    I like to know where the bird is and have some degree of control over when the bird flushes and which way it is going, especially when I am hunting with youth. I also like a dog that will hold the bird until I get set on big fields or rough ground.

    With a versatile dog you get all that plus the tracking, and land and water retrieves.
     
  8. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    My Brit is here beside me waiting for Fall. Great friends and performers in the field. Shoot well, Bob
     
  9. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Most of the bigger Labs can last a few hours in heavy cover. The smaller labs can hunt longer. I've had 3 labs. Started with a GSP in 82'. I now run 1 setter, a Ryman, and 3 Drahthaars which are a certified versatile breed. The Drahthaars are close workers, smarter than any lab I've ever seen, and will bust brush like a Springer. They point, are water dogs, natural retrievers, and easily trained. They can also track fur and blood, and will retrieve fox, turkey, anything, but a pup is normally around a $1,000. We hunt Ducks, geese, pheasants, and dove. They do it all. But, there is nothing as beautiful as a setter on point in the wind.
     
  10. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I hunted with flushers for years. The hunting was okay. But when I bought my first pointing breeds the hunting reached a new level. It was night and day. I prefer pointing dogs on all birds but on some birds they are the only option. When hunting wild bobwhite quail there isn't a flusher made that can compare with any good pointing dog. Now when I hunt with friends who own labs I tell them to leave them at home. They only get in the way. I don't even consider the lab a true upland bird dog. They are nothing more than a retriever trying to do double duty. They are always second rate in the uplands.
     
  11. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    No matter what dog you select [because everybody's dog is the best] = TRAIN, TRAIN, TRAIN!! An untrained dog is horrible to hunt with. Also, get a dog out of PROVEN hunting lines, not all dogs will hunt just because they are a lab or pointer, etc. Go to field trials, retriever trails, etc. watch the parents and talk to breeders. Yes, it will cost you $$$'s for a well bred dog, but worth every penney!! Finally, out west get the snake inoculations [again worth every penney]. Best of luck... there is nothing more pleasurable [even sex = I am old] than hunting over a well trained dog. Fred
     
  12. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I have a big yellow lab and a good GSP. Love them both but when it comes to upland birds, the GSP wins the ability contest hands down. The shorthair has also been a lot easier for me to train. Be forewarned about the shorthairs though - they need alot of exercise and human contact and they are very intense in most everything they do. The only possible limitation of the GSP would be in very cold climates. Labs are wonderful hunting companions as well and you won't go wrong if that's what you decide to do.
     
  13. BLKLABS

    BLKLABS TS Member

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    If you have hunted over labs for 30 years you should already know what is best. If you are considering another dog than you should just be considering 3 things. Black, Yellow, or Chocolate?
     
  14. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    This year I will be cheating. My only limitation bird hunting was finding the dogs on point when hunting in big areas where I really let the dogs run to find birds. Even with beeper collars that limited me to the hearing range of the collar. I will have 3 Garmin Astro collars this season. They will have several big advantages over the beeper collars. The dogs quickly learned to run to the dog that was on point to get in on the action. Now the beeper is on my handheld GPS. Sometimes in late season I think the birds get wise to the beeper and run. That problem is solved. My GPS even has some of the boundaries in it showing the edges of the public land where I hunt. With the topo map I will know if the dogs are running the ridges or in the bottoms. When I whistle a dog in I will know if they are still running or coming in. I will know at the end of the day which dog covered the most ground and their average speed. I will be able to look at their ground pattern and see which dog hunted the cover the most efficiently. I will be able to look at the screen and know where every dog is and whether they are on point or running any time. I can't wait until this bird season. Only a few weeks left. I will have 8 dogs this season all in their prime.
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Highflyer -

    What kind of bird hunting are you doing? Sounds like a hoot. Dense cover bobwhites?
     
  16. JDinTX

    JDinTX Member

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    Pointing Lab. Best of both worlds. Smart as a whip. The one I have is a relatively small bred lab at 58#, and can hunt all day. This is best dog I have ever had any dealing with and I've been around a bunch of em. JD
     
  17. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    If you're young, have good legs and real, wild birds-go Springer. If you're like the rest of us that hunt pen raised chickens-go pointer!!
     
  18. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I will be hunting wild bobwhites, pheasants and prairie grouse up and down the middle of the country. I also try to get in waterfowl hunts when I can. I have pointing dogs that work close and pointing dogs that work far. I pair them up for maximum coverage. I like to have 3 dogs down all the time when I can. It is pure beauty when you come up on several pointing dogs all locked up on birds. An explosion of excitement just waiting for you to come in and start the action.
     
  19. JJJ

    JJJ TS Member

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    I had a English Springer Spaniel. He was like a brother to me. He was tremendous on wild pheasants. Very intelligent & friendly. Besides being an excellent hunter & companion,he use to lay on the front seat & pull the briars out of my hunting pants.
    After Mike,my springer,passed on & I was older. The key word here is older, I switched to setters.
    So what I am saying, a lot depends on your age.
    Joe Jordan
     
  20. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    A flusher by definition is limited to shotgun range. The dog needs to stay within 35 yards all the time. This severely limits their effectiveness. On some birds and in some areas it makes them almost worthless.
     
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