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O/T How to remove a corroded broken stud?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Shooting Jack, Jun 6, 2009.

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  1. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I have a Penn International 30 reel and the rod retainer stud somehow got corroded from salt water and broke when I tried to remove them. Is there anything that will make it easier to remove the broken studs. They broke off even with the frame. I remember reading somewhere on TS.com about removing corroded studs but couldn't find it. Help Please. Jackie B.
     
  2. Texas Ton

    Texas Ton TS Member

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    Soak it for a day in a good penetrating oil, might heat the outer area around the stud before putting the oil on. Then use a reverse bit, depends on how back it's stuck.
     
  3. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    SnapOn as well as Mack tools has left hand drill bits that may work, if not use an easy out after that. Jeff
     
  4. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    My wife usually just says, "Get the hell out or I'm calling the police."

    -Gary
     
  5. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Weld a nut or washer to the end of the stud.
     
  6. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    how big is it and how much room around it do you have. also try a slight amount of heat and ,elt a candle andor a crayon into the top of it. migh wick through the threads and make it easier to get out.
     
  7. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    It's metric but smaller than a 1/4 inch bolt. It is broken off even with the housing. I'm afraid to use heat as it will take the gold finish off the housing which is about $150.00 to replace. Will try to wick some wax through. Appreciate the suggestions. Jackie B.
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Wicking wax is an excellent idea. But you still need to physically latch onto the stud to get it out. As a last resort (short of installing a Heli-Coil), I've used step drills and have progressively gone larger and larger in diameter until the bolt or stud body is gone, leaving only its threads, kinda like a Heli-Coil. Then peeled the threads out of the part. The trick here is to go very slow, and make sure the initial hole is dead center.
     
  9. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    I have also used Brian's method many times. You need to have that initial hole dead center. Removing material from the center also allows the remaining material to relax inward, making it easyer to remove. There is a special punch you can buy that has a curved end for getting started under the remaining threads. Once you get under the top thread you can usually peel the rest right out.
     
  10. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I also wondered if it would help if I took a punch and hammer and gently tapped on both sides of the bolt. One suggestion is to use left hand bits to drill/remove broken stud but since I have access from either side I will try to drill from the inside but first need to break loose from the corrosion. Jackie B.
     
  11. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    Another thing that you could try if none of the above work out is to take it to your local vocational center and have one of the better students or the instructor of the welding program TIG weld another stud to the broken one. Then there will be something to latch onto to twist the broken piece out. It'll be free of charge, and the instructor gets to show his or her class a new trick.
     
  12. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    THAT left drill technique is about the best! been there done it, like it!

    As for wicking wax into the threads,

    Having seen how very little heat will wick a lite oil thru a pin hole the water will not penatrate, I have to ask why use wax?


    """I also wondered if it would help if I took a punch and hammer and gently tapped on both sides of the bolt. One suggestion is to use left hand bits to drill/remove broken stud but since I have access from either side I will try to drill from the inside but first need to break loose from the corrosion. Jackie B.""""

    I ask, wich side gives you the best ability to center the drill in threaded part you need to remove? the best ability to hold the body without marring the "gold plating"?

    I have many screws using both left and right hand drills that the heat of drilling along with a drills affinity for grabbing as it starts to brake thru, that while drilling, all of sudden get a grip on the screw and take it out with damaging the threads.

    AL
     
  13. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    We keep our Penns in Crown Royal bags ! Hate pourin it out to get them though. Jeff
     
  14. magnumshot

    magnumshot Active Member

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    Take the whole reel apart and drill the stud using a drill press. Then get a small easy out or some other removal tool. I wouldn't mess it up if you are not good at it. You could send it to someone who rebuilds them. Take out all the screws and grease them.
     
  15. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    May I suggest that if it has value and it is stuck due to corrosion, that you seek professional help, as sure as hell you'll probably ruin it before it's over with. Keep in mind that if it's stuck solid enough to have been twisted off, then it's not going to come out easy. Trust me on this.....Theres no such thing as an "EASY OUT"......They would be my last act of desperation. Gun shows, flee markets, and garage sales are littered with failed attempts at removing broken things. I would not compound the problem by attempting to remove it unless you have the proper equipment. Removing broken threaded objects is an art.
     
  16. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Why use wax? Because wax melts easily and capillaries (wicks) very well into the joint between metals. It's actually an excellent penetrating medium, which is why it is used for waterproofing.<br>
    <br>
    Also, wax is a solid at the same temp oil is a liquid. But at higher temps, wax tends to burn at a bit higher temp than oils, so the wax is less apt to become carbonized in the joint between metals, which would tend to make burned oil act as a sealer. Obviously there are high temp oils, but many of these have additives, including metallic particles and detergents that are undesirable. Wax is pure.<br>
    <br>
    I've used a propane torch and candle wax many times to free up frozen bolts, studs, and nuts.
     
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