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O/T Help-Browning/Win. 1885 Hi-Wall Question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by ExFedex, Mar 20, 2007.

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  1. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    Recently acquired a like new Browning 1885 BPCR in 45-70. The hammer will go back to full cock position but when trigger pulled will only fall to the half-cock or safe position. The hammer will not contact the firing pin at all. Removed stock, flushed and lubed visible parts, etc.. Anyone have experience with this model rifle that might save me having to ship it back to the factory? Being a pretty heavy firearm I do not think it will "travel well". Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    This arm may have an overtravel screw for the trigger. Check for that first. Hold the trigger down and press the hammer forward. Operation is obvious. Snapping it may damage sear or hammer. These are simply designed arms, and BTW, are a HOOT to shoot with black powder.
     
  3. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    I have a Browning 1885 Traditional Hunter in .38-55, assume it's the same action?

    If you hold the trigger back and ease the hammer down it'll only go down to the safety half-cock, same thing if you put you'r thumb on the hammer spur to slow the hammer fall. Cock the hammer and pull the trigger letting the hammer fall full force and it goes all the way down--------and stays down so it's not a rebounding hammer. Must be kind of a safety feature to keep the gun from accidently firing if the hammer slips off you'r thumb while easing it down from full cock to half cock, I haven't had it apart so I don't know how it works? Must be some kind of inertia activated giszmo.

    John C. Saubak
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    John Saubak's advice is sound if you are manually lowering the hammer. The very slightest finger pressure on the hammer causes it to drop to half cock.<br>
    <br>
    If you are trying to actually fire (or dry fire) the gun, and the hammer is falling to half cock, it could be that the trigger weight adjustment screw is simply set too light. I had this happen on one of my Browning 1885 High Walls in .223 after I adjusted it as light as I could. Increased the tension a bit and that solved the problem.<br>
    <br>
    And to answer John's question, yes, all Browning and Win/USRA 1885 actions are basically the same. The major differences are in the physical dimensions of the 1885 Low Wall (actually a "Medium Wall"), and the automatic ejector or extractor. The Low Walls use an extractor to reduce weight. The conventional High Walls use an automatic ejector, and there is a deflector that can set to toss the cartridge right, left, or when centered, stop it in the loading trough. I don't recall which one the BPCR or Traditional hunter have. Please refresh my memory.<br>
    <br>
    The B-78 lacks the hammer fly, and there were enough accidental discharges that Browning redesigned it into the 1885.<br>
    <br>
    BTW, you probably noticed I said "Medium Wall" above. If you look at the High Wall, the breech block is fully supported. Original Low Walls had the rear cut down to below the centerline of the bore. They did not support the breechblock enough to use with anything other than rimfore or low intensity centerfires. Browning designed their Low Wall to extend the rear of the receiver to above the centerline of the bore. That's why I call it a "Medium Wall". I figure that's a pretty good description of what it is.<br>
    <br>
    I wanted one of these "Low Walls" in .22LR, but never got around to getting one. I have four of the 1885 High Walls. A pair of .223's. Why a pair? I figured it would be one of the few guns I'd wear out, so when I heard Browning was discontinuing the .223 in the High Wall, and would make it in the Low Wall, I ordered another. This was about a year apart, and when it arrived I was surprised to find I had consecutive serial numbers! I bought a nice, used .22-250 while I was trying to find the first 1885 in .223 (they had just been announced in that cartridge). And later a .25-06 Wyoming Centennial with a gold inlaid antelope on the receiver side. I wanted a .30-06, but never got around to it.<br>
    <br>
    In addition, I have several original Winchester 1885's. A Low Wall in .22LR that's being restored. Another Low Wall in .25-20 Single Shot (longer and skinnier than the .25-20 WCF) topped with a JW Fecker 3x scope. A High Wall in .32-40 with a Lyman Targetspot 15x scope (and I use it for blackpowder varminting). I have a High Wall Thickside with a #4 heavy barrel in .50-140-700 (.50 cal, 140gr blackpowder and a 700 grain bullet). Makes the .45-70 seem puny. Also some project guns, like one that will eventually be a 45-70 long range. And a .22 Short High Wall Musket, though it has a bad bore. This is the later coil spring model, and the hammer goes to half cock when the action is cycled, unlike the earlier leaf spring model that goes to full cock (which I prefer because it makes follow up shots faster). I was going to wildcat this to .17 Vixen at one time, but was having a hard time getting a source of primed but unloaded .22WMRF brass. Dies were no problem. If you're wondering what the .17 Vixen is, it's one of the forerunners of the .17 Hornaday Magnum Rimfire, and is almost identical. The .17 Vixen came out of Australia around the same time people were experimenting with necked down .22 WMRF brass here.<br>
    <br>
    I really like the 1885, and it's my favorite rifle design. I've killed more critters with my 1885 in .223 than with all my other firearms combined. It's a tack driver, and will cut 1/2" groups with careful handloads. Even el cheapo commercial reloads like Black Hills or Ultramax will do 1" or better. Good factory loads will do 3/4" to 1". The .22-250 ain't far behind. Both are topped with Leupold 6.5-20x 40mm AO scopes with target knobs. And the 28" barrels are giving me a nice velocity boost, especially with the .22-250.
     
  5. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    Also check and see if the hammer is hitting your scope if you have a scope on it. I have seen people put their scope on with low rings and had that problem. I myself like the Browning B-78 better then I do the 1885.
     
  6. AAtrap

    AAtrap Well-Known Member

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    Just sold a Win.85 low wall in 32 rim fire. Brian, like you, would like to have one in the 22lr.--Steve
     
  7. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    Thanks for all the input. Got the gun completely torn down today and nothing obvious. Put a primed empty in it and hammer will not fall forward enough to fire it. Trigger movement seems limited and adjustment screw only turns about 90 degrees left and right. Another learning experience. Assembly manual should arrive Tuesday I hope. Your help and insight to this beautiful rifle is greatly appreciated.
     
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