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O/T gun dogs

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BPSR, Nov 13, 2007.

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  1. BPSR

    BPSR Member

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    What would you recommend for a good pheasant dog. I've been looking at GSPs, but wondering how their temperment is. Are they a hyper acting dog, or kind of mellow? Never owned a pointer, not sure if I'd like one with the cover I hunt being 4 to 6 feet high in places. Do they make a good family/house dog? One other question, how many years can a GSP physically hunt, before they start going downhill?
     
  2. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Depends on you also- how good of a dog trainer or handler are you? How fast do you walk?

    What personality do you like in a dog?

    First you have to decide

    1. Retriever such as lab
    2 Flusher such as springer
    3. Pointing dog--- wide range of them

    Generall category 1 and 2 are pretty easy to train- if you get them from good blood lines

    Category 3 requires a lot of work--- usually- on the other hand I now have a french britt that just picks it up by taking her out and some yard work

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  3. Southern Gent

    Southern Gent TS Member

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    Well, if you are like me, and like to move along at a "stately" pace, take a look at a Weimaraner from good hunting stock, preferably from an owner that hunts, not field trial stock.

    I've had two that were bird hoovering machines. very soft mouths on the retrieve,and natural retrievers. Incredibly easy to train. They love hunting for the hunter, I have never seen one that took off and hunted for itself. Retrieve from water, although I wouldn't use one in hard freezing conditions.

    Personally, I don't want a dog to point a bird a half mile off.

    GSP are good too, I would consider them the 220V version of a Weimaraner.

    You can start hunting one at about a year of age, but really should get top notch performance at two, and they can hunt for 8-10 years.
     
  4. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Trained Englsih Springer Spaniels for competition field trials AND just plain old hunting. As Gene said... you must have good bloodlines in any working dog. Don't believe someone when they say they have a certain dog and therefor they will work. Look at the papers to see the championship WORKING lines. I am partial to springers for pheasants and all upland game. They are easy to train, make good companions, and work hard. You must know how to read your dog if they are a flushing dog... Flushing dogs work in close move fast when quartering and will push your bird up within 10 to 20 yards of the gun. They are good retrievers as well. Also, they can handle warm and cold weather... not as cold as a Labrador. Springers are also one of the few breeds that will retrieve dove... they don't mind the loose feathers. Well I made my pitch. Good luck with your chosen breed. There is nothing like a well trained dog in the field!! Fred
     
  5. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    If your going to hunt tall heavy cover, get a flusher and teach him to work and stay close (which can be very "trying" in itself). Pointers can be worked in heavy cover if you use a beeper collar so you can locate the dog on point, but it usually becomes a fiasco since the birds run so much. Few dogs will fight off their instinct to chase a running bird. Check out the stud and bitch and see how fast they hunt, regardless of what breed you choose. In all breeds, there are 110v, 220v, and 480v dogs. Check out the bloodline. We hunt 3 Drahts and a setter. All the Drahts have diff. speeds. Controlling the dog through proper training pays dividends.
     
  6. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    brittney.
     
  7. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Tripod- do you still have a brittany?

    regards

    Gene
     
  8. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    Tripod,

    Spears?

    Seriously, a good pointing dog will work quite well. I usually start with Spring-born pups and yard train them during the Summer months. In this way i can start hunting them in the Fall as earl as 5-6 months of age. Get them used to a beeper collar so you can fiond them on point in tall cover.

    As far as breed is concerned, pointing dogs cover the gamut from hot-blooded to almost laconic. Most have great temperments but some are easier to live with in close proximity. English Pointers have a reputation for being very active but I have had several and they have been very easy to live with in the house. My personal favorite is the English Setter. They are truly wonderful dogs around the family but their lionger coats may pose a problem with the wife.

    I have discovered that a dog's temperment can be molded by your's IF you get the dog at a young enough age. The secret is to always remain calm, be firm and be consistant. The dog will pick up on your attitude and adopt a personality which is pleasing to you. Of course, some renegades are incorregible (sic) and will never adapt to family life or the strictures you want to place on them.

    Look around and visit a number of kennels. See the different breeds and narrow it down to a couple of choices. Then make the decision and be prepared to expend some effort to develop the pup into what you want both as a hunting dog and a family member.
     
  9. coyote268

    coyote268 TS Member

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    I have had two Shorthairs. Dotti (The Wonder dog she was called), was by far the best Pointer I have had the pleasure to hunt with. I might add that I use to get a field trial shooter and occasionally judged field trials so I am somewhat bias to Shorthairs. My other one was Blazer a male and yet another great hunter. I hunted Dotti until she was twelve and took Blazer on his last hunt when he was fourteen. He could only walk then but he was game.

    They make good faamily dogs the female being a little gentler. Additionally as said above the breed and bloodline makes all the difference on how good they should prefor. Shorthairs are a great choice for the pointing breeds and terrain meant for them. I have also gunned over Springers and they are a better choice in the higher cover you might be talking about. They are a happy go lucky hunter and work very hard. Great ditch dogs. The bottom line is get a breed that matches your huntintg conditions and is a pleasure to have in the home. The Male Shorthairs do have a tendency to be protective of the home as with most of the German breeds.
    Dan
     
  10. trap41

    trap41 TS Member

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    Get a Hungarian Viszla....best dog I have ever had.

    Trap
     
  11. gunner53

    gunner53 TS Member

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    don't usually say much on here but I had to respond to this. I have a English Setter a lewellen and they are wonderful dogs great temperment and a great dog for foot hunters. Easily trained and great after the hunt sit with you and nap with you great for us older guys lol.
     
  12. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I have two GSPs and one yellow lab. They are all good dogs but in my opinion the lab has the edge for pheasants. My lab doesn't have a problem finding birds (living or dead)and he works fairly close. The lab doesn't lock up and point like a GSP but his tail lets me know when to get ready for a shot. The pointers have better noses and can cover more ground but roosters tend to run more often than not and usually you only get points when the birds are in the really thick stuff. Most of the rooster country I know gets pretty cold in the late season and the GSPs don't have much protection against that.

    Mostly I hunt desert quail and the GSPs dominate that game. My oldest pointer is 11 and still hunting but physically he peaked out at about 6 or 7. These days I will only hunt him for an hour per day, otherwise he is in a lot of pain for the next day or so.

    So if I were looking for a rough duty pheasant dog I would put the lab on the top of the list. I do love the GSPs though.
     
  13. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    I used a poodle for 10 years! Damn good dog! Only problem....he liked to pee on the ducks before he brought them to me!
     
  14. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    Weimaraner! Hands down! My Weimaraner is going on 10 and she can hunt all day long with dogs half her age. She has held point as well as any setter from the time she was 8 months old....No collar necessary! These dogs were bred to stay with their master and live to hunt with their master...They were orignally bread to accompany the German Forrester to help aprehend poachers and track and retrieve wounded game on land and water! They will hunt all day defend your home and family with their lives and are one of the smartest dogs I have ever seen!

    If this is going to be a first time hunting dog Weimaraners are the easiest to train as well because of the loyalty to their master vs just being hell bent on getting critters like other breeds...If you want to see a picture of Lucky and I with 2 SD late season roosters check out www.browning.com and click on the Browning Trophy case then type in Mark Suda....BTW they are the most beautiful hunting dogs as well!
     
  15. hairy

    hairy TS Member

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    Don't be bashful Mark, let's get you right on here. Nice picture.

    The Browning trophy case is fun to browse thru.
     
  16. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    Thanks Hairy! That was very nice of you to post that for me! I am very proud of that picture and that particular moment for Lucky and I!
     
  17. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Gene, I have kind of quit bird hunting so when my brit Max died I got my old chocolate lab and hunt my pond. I loved the brits though. I think overall they are best.
     
  18. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Ducks, my old brit outhunted every retreiving and flushing dog he was around. He was not as eager to retrieve as labs or maybe other dogs, but he would absoloutly love to hunt and hunt dead better than any dog I ever had. I had three male brits and they all had their strong points, but they would all outhunt any flushing or retrieving dog I ever hunted with Some of the other pointing breeds were as adept at hunting, but far too rangy for me. Used him on ducks in warm weather too. Like I say, not as good as retrievers there, but still way helpfull.
     
  19. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    If you want a dog that you can successfully train yourself and don't want to deal with the hair of lab look at a Weim...I will say that my friend had a Pointing Lab and it was one of the neatest dogs I ever saw...I know I am biased when I say it still wasn't a Weim....I guess the best way to be your own judge would be to hunt behind the type of dog you want before you decide...Kinda like a test drive....I'm sure you could find someone with Labs and GSP's to hunt with for sure! All I know is that most GSP's and Labs that have a strong will to hunt usually need collar training...Not to say that every Weim does not need a shock collar but most I have seen don't due to their desire to be with their masters. That is why a novice trainer can get the equivalent of a finished dog with a little patience and know-how. My Weim was the first dog that I ever trained and trust me I am no professional or even close for that matter and I was able to train my Weim very easy! Most people that hunt with me actually ask me if I had her professionally trained? I proudly say no! Basic obedience and getting your dog in front of birds early and often is all you need to do with a Weim. No collar necessary!

    Save your money on getting a finished dog, a shock collar. Get a Weim get the satisfaction of training it yourself and never look back! They will hunt all day, defend your home and family with their lives and there is nothing they can't accomplish in the field!!!
     
  20. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    BTW....I love this topic just because everyone has such a personal bias for their own breed even though it only confuses the matter I'm sure! How fun!
     
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