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O/T German Shorthair question

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by BPSR, Aug 27, 2009.

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  1. BPSR

    BPSR Member

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    Wondering what,if any downfalls there are to these dogs. Do they have in any genetic problems,say like labs with hip displaysia concerns? I would like a good pheasant dog,but not an expert on what to look for in a dog.
     
  2. SirMissalott

    SirMissalott Active Member

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    Well he is German and he is Short Haired, I just don't know if this is what you are talking about.LOL I couldn't help it good luck with the new dog. Jim W<a href="http://s43.photobucket.com/albums/e362/jjps/?action=view&current=Random012.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
     
  3. stskid

    stskid TS Member

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    I have a 10 year old GSP and she has been a true pleasure and great hunting partner. I've been told by my vet that the breed can develop some liver issues, so I have a blood panel run each year to check. He said the problems are rare.

    I don't think the breed is as suseptable to hip problems as much as labs are, but just make sure you have a reputable breeder and that the pups have been certified.

    GSP's can be a bit nervous without plenty of exercise, so if you do decide on the breed and you plan to keep in the house make sure you have the time and inclination to exercise it.

    Other than that my experience has shown me the breed to be inteligent, loving, devoted pets with an absolute love for hunting. Again, I would advise you check out the breeder and then check again.

    I think if you decide on a GSP you won't be disapointed.

    Rick Reading
     
  4. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    Rick is spot on.
     
  5. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    GSP's are like any other hunting dog. If you get a pup out of good breeding stock, your chances of a good pup are better. You can end up with a big running GSP or Setter if it's in their breeding. Before you buy a pup, hunt with the stud and bitch, or pups out of a previous litter, and see how they hunt, how they take commands, and how hyper they are. Talk to other people that own dogs out of the breeding pair. Breeding and training make a good dog.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    We have a 13 year-old (soon to be 14) male GSP who has been a super dog. He came from hunting stock and pointed flies and toads almost right away. Unfortunately, there aren't many pheasants left to hunt in Pennsylvania unless you pay big bucks to hunt pen-raised birds, so he hasn't had a lot of hunting practice. He learned things quickly and housebreaking was not a problem.

    Our son trained him to respond to hand signals in one afternoon using a police whistle. I would hide the dog's eyes and Jason would throw Maxx's tennis ball (they LOVE tennis balls) into the woods. We then would send Maxx after it and when he got off course, Jason would blow the whistle. Maxx would stop, look at Jason and go in the direction Jason pointed.

    Maxx is 28" at the shoulder, which is 2" over the standard for GSPs but his father was a huge dog. Maxx weighed 84 pounds in his prime and now weighs about 90 pounds but there still isn't a lot of fat on him. His hips are weakening and he has an "age growth," as our vet referred to it, on his head. She said she could operate on him to remove it but it would probably just grow right back. It looks like a rough-surfaced mushroom.

    Jason recently bought a shorthair of his own. Jake is six months old and is a holy terror compared to Maxx even when he was a pup. But he is a nice dog and smart like Maxx - I taught him to "give me four" (shake hands) in a few minutes earlier tonight (we're dog-sitting while Jason is on a coyote hunt). They are very active dogs but not really "hyper" in the true sense of the word, although I guess some could be.

    I'm a firm believer in not replacing a dog with the same breed - the second never seems to be as good as the first. But we like the qualities of the GSP so much, we're probably going to get a Weimaraner when Maxx is gone. They're about the same thing only different, if that makes sense.

    Ed
     
  7. Chipper77

    Chipper77 Member

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    Rick is absolutely correct if you don't keep the dog exercised. They can be self entertaining & that can sometimes be interesting to say the least. I would get another in a heartbeat as they are very good pets & hunters as well. You must get one from good hunting lines unless you don't mind a long ranging (field trial type) dog. I would highly recommend Hillhaven lines. Dave Hill has been breeding GSP's for 30 years, his dogs are bird finding machines & have great temperments as well.
     
  8. John Browning

    John Browning TS Member

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    I would advise you not to buy one,I bought a slightly used female about four years ago and my troubles began. The dog we got was house broken and was trained to hunt and I got her for 400.00,my fiancee took her to her vet for a checkup and informed me I now had a 700.00 dog.
    I was living in a large city at the time and had a fenced back yard, but it was small. I found out a shorthair can easily either scale a 6 foot fence or dig under one in about 15 minutes. I finally ended up putting a electric fence 1 foot off the ground to keep her in. I thought I had my problems solved when she started barking to get out,I bought a bark collar which worked except she then switched to a high pitch whine that drove the whole block nuts. I started receiving notes about how terrible I was being to bitch, and I knew they were going to start calling the cops.
    I finally decided we had to move, actullay I tell people we thrown out of the city and it is close to being true. I now live on 7.5 acres with a creek on one side and a 3 acre pond in back and the dog has a barn and a 1 acre dog fenced play area and she stiil thinks I should take her to my farm every day.
    John
     
  9. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    BPSR, well I'll tell you my story. I've had 4 in my life time. My son has one which was his first. I've never and I mean never ever seen a bad shorthair and have hunted for 45 years and been around a few dogs in my day. Of the 4 that I've had and my sons, I've not seen one that didn't have the heart to do anything you asked it to hunt, for as along as you wanted to hunt and for as many days in succesion as you wanted to hunt. The first was not actually mine.but my hunting and trapshooting mentor. There was an Air Force base in town when I was young and a lady whos husband was a pilot were going back to Germany for another tour and they didn't want to take it along. There are still many a stories about that dog in the community and surrounding area of which it hunted. Downfall or fault. Hated coyotes with a passion. Seen it actually whip two different adults in its life. Spent its life with us on a farm and I guess it was tired of listening to them.

    My first was 6 months old when I got her. I was right out of school and literally hunted for atleast an hour or two everday during hunting pheasant season. Family business allowed such. That lady never tired. In her life, weekends and holidays found us hunting from sunup to sunset. She worked prarie chicken as well as any dog I've ever seen or heard of. Retired ducks with enthusiasm and many times from water so cold that I should have never sent her in. She learned on her own a tatic for hunting roosty's that I've heard some about but have never seen another dog do and she done it consistently. If a rooster wouldn't hold and decided it wanted to sprint she would circle and pen the ole boy between us. That was the most valuable asset that I have ever witnessed in a hunting companion.I trained her to not got past the yard boundaries of our home in the city. No need for a fence. She was protective and don't try to enter my truck, home or the yard without my presence.

    Second of mine was a speed up model with alot of english influence from field trial stock which ex bought me for a present. She was faster and ranged farther than I was use to and was alittle much at times for wild roosties unless she wore an e collar of which I bought one for. She loved to retrieve and you could play fetch all day long and she would never tire. At six months of age she pointed 7 covey's on her first real hunting scenario. Retrieved ducks and an occasional goose without problems. She was smaller sized shorthair and it was funny watching her with a adult canada in her mouth. She was also very protective of what she thought was hers/ours especially the house and the truck. Lost her at seven due to a tumors.

    Third was somewhere between my first and second. Great hunter and would hunt for days on end and never want to stop or lay down to rest. Again she was very protective of what was hers or mine.

    My sons dog, again I have nothing but praise for. He'll work and with desired results anything we've ever asked him to. Never tires, even after multiple consecutive days. Loves to point fish when you are reeling them in and after they are returned to water. My son trained him not to bark also. Not protective as mine were.

    All our shorthairs live and have lived with us. None have been out of high powered gene pools. All have been trained by uS.

    Now BPSR, I will tell you right upfront that I don't know very much. Never claimed to. But I've been around a few years and have paid alittle bit of attention. The above I only share my experiences. But remember one thing that I truly believe. A dog will give you everything your willing to put into it withtime and effort. They don't need to be from hir powered stock but this does inccrease your chances of a really exceptional hunting companion. As suggested above, view the parents under realistic hunting conditions as strains are developed for different desires. Knowing this going in will help get you a more pleasing companion for your style, temperment and conditions you frequent. Originally bred to hunt fur, feather and fowl, alot of the fur and fowl has been forgotten with our typical bird dogs. But these genetic strains do exist if that is what you want. Now I will tell you that at this time I don't personally own a GSP but due have a wirehair. Reason being I wanted to try one before smething ends my hunting. If you want a breed with unique character here's something new for you to think about. I still have a deep passion for shorthairs. I actually really enjoy alot of breeds except one of which I will never ever own!

    EE, I'll play your game. Your pick of companion aginst my sons. You name the gentlemanly wager.

    AverageEd, if you desire PM me about your possible new selection. I have owned one and been around several who own them.
     
  10. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    In general GSPs can be fine hunting dogs. Of course the question of breeding must be taken into account. Even then, there are a few question you need to ask of yourself. Have you ever owned and trained a bird dog? What kind of temperment do you have? Are you too hard or too soft on a dog? How much time and effort are you willing to put into a dog?

    After many years of experience with many breeds of bird dogs I can say that in many cases the dog will be a reflection of you. Put in the time, do it correctly and a GSP will serve you as a personal hunting dog well as any other breed.
     
  11. howie

    howie Member

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    I've had three GSPs. They are great dogs. If you want to hunt one, be careful about the line. I like a gentleman's dog, slow and close working. Much of the breeding today is for a big "classy" running dog. I just find this type of dog no fun at all to hunt. I know its is a matter of preference, and that may what you want, just make sure the dog will perform in the field as you wish, not as the dog is wired to do.
     
  12. 7771

    7771 Active Member

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    I have three GSP's and the vet told me that some males can get prostate cancer if they are not fixed. but one of my males is 14 and hes still going just got to keep them fit and healthy.
     
  13. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    I had a few and every one was great . Breed 2 bitches one time each and great litters . Brother in law also had one and cried when he had it put to sleep . His dog had a better nose than all of mine so the dog or linage may have an affect of what one will find scent better . Mine were all house pets and well behaved . Indoor - outdoor may have a different opinion where to keep them but we preferred a house pet . Too old to start again or even hunt again since trap shooting is more into my blood now but I love the breed and good luck should you decide to get one .
     
  14. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

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    Advice given to me by Joe McCarl (of Hard Driving Kennels), who worked with my setter and I this summer was, "if you're going to be hunting mostly pheasants, I'd go with a Springer Spaniel or Cocker Spaniel". He also mentioned that he felt the AKC/show ring had done a lot of harm to GSP, Vizsla, and Weimaraner lines. Good hunting dogs are there from those breeds, but it takes a little more work to find them.

    What ever breed you go with, the individual dog needs a LOT of bird drive, and will drive you up the wall at times. I've got a 16 month old Llewellin, and at least once a day I want to strangle him.

    ~Michael
     
  15. BRGII

    BRGII TS Member

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    My Shorthair finds, points, and will retrieve from water. She will not retrieve birds on dry land, go figure. She will run down and dispatch cripples but will not bring them to me. Pisses me off, but I love her anyway. Great companion and tireless. BRGII
     
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