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O/T - French drain in garage question

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by joe kuhn, Aug 25, 2012.

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  1. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    Cement guy talked me into a french drain in the middle of our garage to absorb the water from the snow and slush that falls off our two cars during our Northern IL winters. This is much less expensive than tearing out the old cement and re-pouring.

    I'm concerned about the drain filling up. It will be 3 ft by 3 ft by 3 ft. He will fill it with gravel and re-pour the cement at the top with a drain hole.

    Someone told me to coil perforated plastic drain tile around the outside of the 3 ft hole to act as a water baffle to be sure it doesn't fill up. I don't know what kind of soil is down there. I know clay doesn't absorb much water. We'll find out Monday.

    Experience?
     
  2. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    All garage floors that were poured without drains slope of about 1" per 8' out of level toward your overhead door. Have you put a level on your floor to see if water will run toward the drain? If not, your only going to collect water in the new 3' x 3' area.

    You need to do a perc test to see if water drains in the bottom of that hole. Things could get really nasty if water just sets in there.

    Wayne
     
  3. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Well-Known Member

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    It worked for me for about 3-4 years. Now it just pools at the drain.

    In the slush and snow there is dirt, gravel and other small debris that will eventually clog the drain.
     
  4. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    Have you thought of or can you even put the french drain in but saw a narrow trench over and to the outside for it to drain to? I helped the neighbor do his and he has very little actually draining into the yard.
     
  5. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    If there's enough slope on your land you could hire a directional boring company and they could bore a hole that they could put a pipe in to allow the water to drain outside

    French drains are illegal here in Texas, because they can help breed skeeters

    But they still get bootlegged in
     
  6. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    The slush and water from the cars pools up right in the middle of the floor where the drain is going to be. I have no doubt about the water going into the drain.

    I am concerned about there being clay under the floor. I looked up 'perc test' and see that it's simply a test hole filled with water and left overnight to see if it will drain into the soil. I like that idea. Maybe the contractor will agree to such a test.

    I'm also concerned about debris plugging the drain over time, but the only solution I can see for that is to clean out the debris or not even have a drain which means taking out the whole floor and re-pouring with the correct slope which is quite an expense for the luxury of not having to squeegee our garage after snows.

    Hm. Thanks for the ideas.

    Joe
     
  7. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    somebody's trying to sell you something expensive. go to home depot, rent yourself a concrete saw, and cut yourself a trench in the floor for the puddled water/slush to drain out. or buy some of that synthetic concrete in a bag and keep pouring in the low spot until you have reworked the floor elevation so it slopes out the door. i can't imagine the need to dig a 3 foot long, 3 foot wide, 3 foot deep hole in the middle of your garage to catch the water from the snow that melts off of 2 cars. what does it amount to? a gallon? or just set patio pavers over the entire surface of the floor: you and the cars will roll on top and the water and slush will roll between the paver joints to the floor below. good luck with it
     
  8. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    The perk test is a good idea, but I would also put in a "crock" to catch the water.

    Cut a 4' x 4' square area of concrete out, then dig the hole 4' x 4' x 4' or as deep as you can. Then place clean #6's in the hole and compact them, Then remove enough stone to insert a crock. They vary in size but something 5-10 gallons should be adequate. They are usually made of plastic. Drill 8-10, 3/8" or smaller holes in the bottom edge of the crock before you set it. Then put your removeable floor drain over the crock.

    The water drains in to the crock, then into the stone. You can remove the floor drain grate and take a wire or 1/4" rod to clear out the holes in the crock if they get full of debris. It also gives you a reserve volumn to catch some water if the stone becomes full of debris or it drains slowly due to ground water. You can also use a ladel to scoop debris out of the bottom of the crock, or even a pressure washer to flush it out.
     
  9. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Once the drain is in place pull the cover up. Place fiberglass window screen very loosely across the opening - actually pressing it down into the hole - and then replace the cover. Trim the screen with a razor knife.

    If it fills with debris just remove the screen and clean it or throw it out and replace it.
     
  10. Ducky

    Ducky Member

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    Joe, You better check with zoning dept in the County or Town. I thought of doing this when I lived in St. Charles. It is illegal as hell. You will end up with an EPA liability when you go to sell. You will have to cut the crap back out and fill it in and re-concrete over it. The EPA doesn't want to risk toxic car dripping getting into the gound water system. I ended up propping open the garage door 1 inch and letting the truck melt and squegeeing in out.Sorry to rain on your parade...

    Scott Lambe Roswell Ga
     
  11. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    Now you tell me.
     
  12. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    no worries. your contractors city/county purchased work permit covers all that legal/epa stuff
     
  13. gun1357

    gun1357 Active Member

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    Not true. Government employee errors don't over-rule codes. Ron (Texas contractor)
     
  14. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Overrated,

    Get a rubber squigee and push what little water collected out the door.
     
  15. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    i thought the purpose of a permit was to have your work inspected after completion to ensure that it meets code
     
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