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O/T EYE SIGHT FLOATERS AND CATARACTS. HELP!!

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by KK, Jul 19, 2006.

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  1. KK

    KK TS Member

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    I have a very close friend that is on the verge of giving up trap shooting because of his eye sight problems. He has Cataracts which will be corrected by surgery shortly, but his real problem is with floaters primarily in his right eye. The problem gets progressively worse with each field shot and his scores fall off badly by the forth field so eye fatigue increases the problem. Apparently there is no medical soulution to the problem, so does anyone know of anything he can do mechanically or physically to reduce the effects of this floater problem. I don't want to lose a shooting partner!! Kirby
     
  2. John Browning

    John Browning TS Member

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    Kirby, I just had cataract sugery this spring and since then the floaters are not near as bad, must be that without the cataract you see past the floaters. John
     
  3. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    Hi Kirby,

    I am an optometrist. My bet would be that once the cataracts are gone the floaters won't be much of a problem. The floaters are caused from the vitreous (the jelly that fills the middle part of the eye) separating from the retina somewhere around age 60 give or take. That happens to all of us and while the floaters are annoying- generally you learn to deal with them. The cataracts on the other hand make everything so dim that any other aggravation is magnified. Sunlight for instance has to cause a lot of glare for him. Tell him to relax, have the surgery and follow his doctors recommendations. One side note, if the floaters were found to be from a vitreous detachment all this holds. If the floaters have not ben checked out then he should be seen to be sure there is no retina problem.

    all the best,
    john
     
  4. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

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    Ron, do you have a name and contact info for this eye surgeon?

    Buz xxxmobuzz_1@msn.comxxx (drop the x's)
     
  5. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    On a bright sunny day the floaters seem more annoying if I have a light color of lenses in my Decot frames. With a darker shade of lenses the floaters are still there but I find it easier to ignore them.
     
  6. Illini bird

    Illini bird TS Member

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    Kirby I did take bilberry. I have found that blueberrys do the same thing. the floaters are still there but are very thin now. Blueberry yogurt with fresh frozen blueberrys on top work even better than anything. L.bird
     
  7. KK

    KK TS Member

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    Thanks for the information guys. I am feeling better already about his situation. It seems none of you feel that this problem is insurmountable. Kirby
     
  8. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    Y'all don't be in such a hurry to check out having the jelly removed. It's a high risk (possibly loss of vision)type surgery for little reward. Most retina surgeons are very very hesitant to do it, and for good reason.

    all the bst,
    john
     
  9. Texshooter

    Texshooter Member

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    I have a friend that just made the state team despite his floaters. He has done better since his cataract surgery. He does not look down while reloading and avoids moving his head any more than necessary while shooting so the floaters will "settle". If he looks up and down the floaters start moving around in the eye and it's harder to see. AJ
     
  10. KK

    KK TS Member

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    John: What is the time frame for returning to shooting after cataract surgery? Thanks Kirby
     
  11. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    I've had floaters most of my life, but just recently got what my opthamologist called "PVD". That's posterior vitreous detachment. Now I have some very big floaters plus flashing lights. I understand this is one of the rewards of having reached veteran classification.

    There is no reason to let this affect your shooting. Trap targets aren't that hard to see, and when your eyes are focused on the target, the floaters aren't that apparent.

    The vitreous detaches primarily, as I understand, because it gets thinner with age. It can, but does not usually, lead to a detached retina, which IS very serious.

    Mine occurred in my right eye, which is my dominant eye. I don't know if recoil exacerbates the problem in any way, but I had a soft touch stock put on my Beretta automatic, and I'm shooting one ounce loads, so I've got recoil as low as I can get it. Better safe than sorry.
     
  12. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    Kirby,

    That question is best put to the surgeon. I think between 2 weeks and a month would be reasonable.

    all the best,
    john
     
  13. biff

    biff Active Member

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    Kirby, I had cataract surgery done to my left eye about 2 months ago. My doctor laughed, at what the nurses told me(not to lift anything heavy or jar myself in any way) before I left the hospital after he did the surgery, the next day in his office. I said when can I shoot again and he said "when ever you want to", I said "today!". He said the way it is placed in my eye it's not going to hurt it to shoot, so I was shooting the next day and have had no problems with it at all.

    Biggest problem I have had, is that the corrected left eye wants to take over occasionally so now I'm wearing tape on the left lens of my shooting glasses. My right eye is 20/20 or I would have had it done at the same time; when I close the left eye which has the new lens, everything with the right eye has a yellowish cast which he said is due to the aging process. I do recommend the replacement lens for the surgery eye to be the multifocal lens.

    I also have floaters in my right eye, the left one now appears to be floater free after the surgery. I, like AJ says, have learned not to look down or move my eyes around right before calling fo a target; lately I have been looking up toward the sky and look out level above the trap house right when I call for the target. This has helped and may be working; in the past I have broken targets I didn't even see because of the floaters(and missed many more). floaters always seem to go right where you are trying to focus your eyes, those of you that don't have them are truly blessed! Biff
     
  14. moonpie

    moonpie TS Member

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    Just had diabetic cataracts removed and new lenses put in and I can now see like when I was a kid...thats past 24 inches that is ... my score went from a 65 to a 92...the sun is way too bright now but sunglasses do the trick
     
  15. gbatch

    gbatch TS Member

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    Kirby:
    There is a fellow on here, or used to be, who is an opthalmic surgeon, from Las Vegas. Perhaps he will chime in here.

    As some here know, about 4 years ago, I had major eye problems. The retina in my right eye detached and after 5 surgical procedures and lots of prayer I have vision back in that eye. Since I have almost no vision in my left eye, this has meant a lot to me.

    Prior to the retina detachment, I was developing cataracts in both eyes and had the floaters that Kirby's friend has. They are terribly distracting. I did have the lens in my right eye replaced at the Wheaton Eye Clinic here in Illinois. There are some indications that those who have cataract surgery may be more at risk for retinal detachment. It doesn't mean it will happen, merely that it seems to be a factor that may increase the likelihood. Smoking is also a risk factor.

    Allow me to make a few suggestions/observations.

    First, tell your friend to find the absolute best opthalmic surgeon he can and see him. Do not go to an optometrist or even merely a regular eye doctor. You must have a specialist involved in this. Happily, the Wheaton Eye Clinic is right in my town and is also a world class facility with specialists in cataract surgery, retinal surgery etc. There are several other world class facilities including Johns Hopkins and Emory University. I'm sure there are others around the US.

    Your friend's doctor is likely to suggest that you have the cataract removed, which means replacing the lens in the eye. The surgeon who did my cataract surgery said he had done over 10,000 procedures successfully. My procedure was on an outpatient basis and I was shooting again in 30 days, after the healing was sufficient.

    One of the surgical procedures I had done after the retinal detachment was the replacement of the vitreous - twice - with distilled water, I believe. I have no floaters but am not aware that this is an accepted procedure to merely get rid of the floaters.

    Deterioration of the vitreous is age related and also related to other risk factors, such as smoking etc. The floaters are, generally, not related to the cataract, which is a clouding of the lens of the eye. It's likely that your friend will see more clearly after the cataract surgery, but the floaters likely will not be gone. Your friend's opthalmologist will likely want to monitor his eye condition, and should do so, as the vitreous can continue to break away. As this happens, a retinal detachment cab become a very real possibilityand, if not treated quickly, loss of vision in that eye can result.

    I am not trying to be a downer here, merely a realist. Happy to answer questions.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  16. EDGARMCM

    EDGARMCM TS Member

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    To those of you have floaters:

    What have your opthalmologists said about how trapshooting may or may not have contriputed to the problem of floaters? Have they suggested that you not continue to shoot? If you have continued to shoot have you developed more floaters?

    I ask these questions as I have developed a rather large floader and other"junk" in my left eye. I have had a smaller floater in the right eye for about 15 years. I have been to retina specialist and have an appointment to go back. At this time the doctor is not able to see any retina damage. I plan to get his opinion on possible harm from continueing to shoot. Really hate to give it up as I had planned to get to Sparta this year.

    I understand that it a part of the ageing process and that nearsightedness contributes to the problem. I am 70 and quite nearsighted.

    Any comments would be appreciated.
     
  17. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    edgar,

    Virtually everyone has a posterior vitreous detachment in the 5th or 6th decade of life. Trapshooting probably has not contributed to it at all. Now, once the floaters caused by the vitreous detachment show up they are most visible when you look at a blank field like the sky, a wall or a white page in a book. The floaters will be much more visible or noticeable to a trapshooter because we are looking into that blank field (the sky) to find the clay. Contrary to some previous posts removal of the vitreous is quite risky. It is done for some problems like diabetes which has caused a bleed into the vitreous (jelly). However, most people are taking too much risk to remove floaters for other reasons.

    For clarity. The vitreous jelly begins liquifying at about 50 years of age or so. The jelly is really made of coalesced fibers and fluid. As it liquifies the fibers separate out in the jelly and are more visible. In addition, when the posterior vitreal detachment occurs the vitreous separates (pulls away from the back of the eye), the retina and takes some retina pigment with it. That's what makes the big circular or spider web looking ring. 99 times out of a hundred this is the end of the story. You just learn to live with the floaters. A retina detachment only occurs rarely and is very different. Hope this helps.

    all the best,
    john
     
  18. idoc

    idoc Member

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    Kirby,

    go to www.lensneye.com Click on 3-D Eye Library. Click on Vitreous. Choose what speed your modem is and sit back with some popcorn. Hope this helps...............Rich Colo O.D.

    Hi john..........optometrist from Conn.
     
  19. wy_don

    wy_don TS Member

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    Concerning dry eyes, I live at 7220', we have a constant gentle breeze of 25-75mph, and almost no moisture. When the snow melts sometime around June, I use a drop of "Alcon, Tears Naturale Forte", 2 drops in each eye, and my eyes stay moist for 2-3 hours. Hope this helps, Don
     
  20. idoc

    idoc Member

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    Chauncey,

    Here we go. 1.No smoking (big) 2.No more than 2 cups of coffe a day. 3. Three to five glasses of water a day. 4. Fish three times a week.

    Things that could make the condition worse: 1.Diabetes 2.Rhumatoid arthiritis 3.Lyme Disease 4. Thyroid disease.

    Take 2000mg fatty acids a day. The best that I have found: "Advanced dry eye" Go to opthealth.com and you can order or see what the formulation is. Eye drops- 4 times a day. the best I have found is systane by alcon. hope this helps.............Rich
     
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