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O/T Do the Inexpensive Sand Blasters Work?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BILL GRILL, Mar 1, 2008.

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  1. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    Steve, They work ok, if you are patient your compressor may get the job done?
     
  2. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    I have one of the non enclosed blasters and while it works good, It makes a hell of a mess. Sand propelled by 100 psi impinging your bare skin will cause you to say some bad words. I would opt for the cabinet model. You have no idea the places sand can get into when blown around unrestrained. When I get another one it will be enclosed. Your compressor should work ok if you give it an occasional break to recover. Mine uses an open container for media supply and it works fine. I haven't used a closed and pressurized supply system.




    Jim
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Bill hits the nail on the head. Patience and a LOT of compressed air.
     
  4. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    For "real small quick jobs" all you need is a real small cheap blaster. One that looks similar to a paint gun. I wouldn't bother with a cabinet unless you would use it a lot. You don't have enough air of a pressure blaster. For fine finishes like on guns use glass beads. Get a good respirator.
     
  5. ArmyMechanic

    ArmyMechanic Member

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    for that matter you can "fabricate" a disposable box out of cardboard or even 3/8" plywood that would last you a bit... (keeps the sand semi-constrained)
     
  6. richrob

    richrob TS Member

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    Glass beads remove the paint and rust but are less abrasive on the metal. With your compressor, buying a cabinet would lead you to buying another compressor.

    That said get a decent cabinet, once you have one you will use it a lot more than you think. Ours is one of the best tools in our garage. -Rich
     
  7. YUKONJACK

    YUKONJACK TS Member

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    I got mine at Sears,looks just like a small suitcase,it holds approx 12 lbs of sand,it works very well for small jobs.Make sure you have a good set of goggles for eye protection as that sand can get in behind normal safety glasses.Good luck.Yukon Jack
     
  8. perazzitms

    perazzitms TS Member

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    I have one of the little paint-spray looking ones. Some notes:

    Make sure your compressor has enough ass to push it. When you think you have a big enough compressor, get the next bigger size. Short bursts are easy on the compressor, but will play hell with the media pick-up. The first second of pulling the trigger you'll be waiting for the sand to show up.

    Have as short a pick-up tube as possible without causing problems. A straight hose from the media bucket (I put the sand in a 5gal bucket) to the gun works best. Remember you're trying to SUCK the sand up the tube, not push it.

    The sand MUST BE DRY. I mean completely dry. Clumpy sand won't feed well. Don't even think of using any sort of blasting media other than sand. It won't flow through the orifice - it just gets jammed up on itself.

    I sandblasted the tongue of my trailer. Worked quite well for a $10 gun and $4 worth of sand. Get your leaf blower out for cleanup - sand will be everywhere. I cupped my hand with a heavy leather glove on the metal and blasted the sand on the metal covered with my palm. Worked best this way.
     
  9. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    perazzitms is right about moisture clogging up the gun. When fine glass beads get wet it plugs up the whole thing. Use a filter. I like the ones I get at the auto paint stores, they are disposable plastic and do a real good job of keeping the water out. Put it next to the blaster not at the coompressor end.
    A fine finish requires glass beads. They come in different grits like sandpaper does. There is lots of different kinds if blast media, silica sand is the cheapest but does not give a fine finish. Menards carries sand and another black media that is coal dust. Just have to experiment. Don't be breathing in silica sand, not healthy.
     
  10. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    When I first started prepping the metal for nickel plating I went with a small cabinet from Harbor Freight. I attached an electrical box to it for a light switch. I also used my shop vac for a vaccum/dust collector. If you do not have the vaccum, you cannot see what you're doing. Also, if you keep the shop vac clean, prior to use, you can pour the media back into the cabinet.

    The "glass" window, will not last long....it's only plastic. I went to a glass shop and they cut me a piece of laminate ($25). It was too thick for the rubber seal, so I duct taped it on top of the seal. The flow of glassbeads is slow. I would take me a 1/2-3/4 of an hour to blast up a 90-T.

    Eventually I found a larger floor model cabinet with dust collector for $200. It was older and used, so I replaced all of the seals and the dust bag. I now can blast a gun in 15 minutes.

    Use the glass beads. Silica sand is VERY dangerous, without the right protection.

    Doug
     
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