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O/T Democrats vote to bar secret union ballot

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Joe Potosky, Mar 1, 2007.

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  1. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    Walter Reuther's Ghost
    Democrats vote to bar secret union ballots.

    Wall Street Journal

    The House of Representatives has scheduled a vote as early as today on a bill that strips 140 million U.S. workers of the right to decide in private whether to unionize. Naturally, it's called the Employee Free Choice Act.

    Big Labor has been agitating to ease union-formation requirements for more than a decade. And prior to last year's election, the AFL-CIO, AFSCME and their allies made it clear to Democrats that this vote would be the most important return they expected on their investment in a Nancy Pelosi Speakership. This is payback day.

    The union claim is that employers are engaging in rampant unfair labor practices to prevent employees from exercising their right to organize. But data from the National Labor Relations Board, which oversees union elections, show no rise in such activities. The reality is that union membership has been in decline for decades, and labor leaders are desperate to rig the rules in order to reverse the trend. In the 1950s, 35% of private-sector workers were unionized. By the early 1980s the number had fallen to 20%, and today it stands at just 7.4%.

    The reason for this decline isn't illegal management meddling in organizing efforts. The problem is that unions haven't been able to persuade the workers themselves. Our own, longstanding position is that when a company is organized it is almost always the company's fault. But workers of all classes and skills can also read the news and understand that unions no longer provide job security, if they ever did. The most heavily unionized industries--such as airlines and Detroit carmakers--are typically those that are financially beleaguered and shedding jobs. Workers know that unions often provide short-term wage gains at the cost of longer-term job insecurity.

    All of which explains the drive to rewrite the rules and do away with secret-ballot elections administered by the NLRB, a procedure in place since the 1935 Wagner Act. Under current rules, once 30% of employees at a workplace express interest in unionizing by signing an authorization card, organizers can go to management and demand voluntary "card-check" recognition. The employer then has the option of recognizing the union or demanding an election.
    It shouldn't be surprising that many workers who sign these cards later have second thoughts after getting the employer's side of the story. Workers sign cards for all kinds of reasons, including peer pressure and intimidation. It's not uncommon for an organizer to approach an employer with cards that show 90% of the workforce wants to unionize, only to have the percentage plummet once employees hear about the downside of a union shop and have a chance to vote by secret ballot. So Big Labor wants to dispense with these petty elections and make union recognition mandatory as soon as a simple majority of workers sign a card.

    Notably, nearly every American business group is united in opposing this affront to worker freedom. They understand this will make organizing that much easier, thus making their own businesses that much less competitive. One business response would surely be to hire fewer workers--the opposite of what the unions claim to want.

    The bill nonetheless has 234 co-sponsors, including seven Republicans, mostly from blue Northeast states such as New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Because the Senate is expected to filibuster the bill and the White House is threatening a veto, these Republicans may figure they can have it both ways: Score points with the unions by supporting a measure that isn't going anywhere. But Members who go on record opposing secret-ballot elections will also have some explaining to do the next time they ask for business support.

    So far this Congress, Democrats have been trying to present themselves as "moderates" who won't return to their bad special-interest selves pre-1994. But this union-enabling bill strips away that mask and exposes an anti-business animus out of the 1970s, if not the 1930s. Even if it fails this Congress, this week's vote is a warning about what could become law if Democrats and their union backers hold all the levers of power after 2008.
     
  2. SirMissalott

    SirMissalott Active Member

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    What happen to the days when unions were for the working man. Not a semi-socialist organization??
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Elimination of the middle class continues. Killing the unions is an important part of this operation.

    Before unions saved workers from abysmal conditions and virtual slavery there was no middle class. Anyone who doubts this must have had their head in the sand for the last 100 years.

    Too bad for our children. The slavery will be more benevolent, (a good farmer takes care of his horses) but it will be serfdom for most of our citizens.

    the rich do not want a lot of company.

    HM
     
  4. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I think the unions killed america's ability to compete in a global market.
     
  5. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    Seems the Deomcrats and Unions have some interesting supporters on this bill.
     
  6. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    Hey Joe,

    Want read something funny. The Dems who think US workers shouldn't have a secret ballot sure wanted Mexican workers to have a secret ballot. Read below and go figure.

    "August 29, 2001
    Junta Local de Conciliacion y Arbitraje del Estado de Puebla
    Lic. Armando Poxqui Quintero
    7 Norte, Numero 1006 Altos
    Colonia Centro
    Puebla, Mexico C.P. 72000

    Dear members of the Junta Local de Conciliacion y Arbitraje of the state of Puebla:

    As members of Congress of the United States who are deeply concerned with international labor standards and the role of labor rights in international trade agreements, we are writing to encourage you to use the secret ballot in all union recognition elections.

    We understand that the secret ballot is allowed for, but not required, by Mexican labor law. However, we feel that the secret ballot is absolutely necessary in order to ensure that workers are not intimidated into voting for a union they might not otherwise choose.

    We respect Mexico as an important neighbor and trading partner, and we feel that the increased use of the secret ballot in union recognition elections will help bring real democracy to the Mexican workplace.

    Sincerely, (16 members of Congress)

    George Miller, Marcy Kaptur, Bernard Sanders, William J. Coyne, Lane Evans, Bob Filner, Martin Olav Sabo, Barney Frank, Joe Baca, Zoe Lofgren, Dennis J. Kucinich, Calvin M. Dooley, Fortney Pete Stark, Barbara Lee, James P. McGovern, Lloyd Doggett"
     
  7. rockshooter

    rockshooter TS Member

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    Hey Tripod, how do you figure that unions killed Americas ability to compete in a global market?
     
  8. Bocephas

    Bocephas Well-Known Member

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    I say do away with all unions.

    Put everyone at $6.00 per hour.

    Now don't that just sound great.
    The big dogs make more money this way.

    The big dogs had better remember one thing.
    Their tax is going to go thru the roof.

    Who in the #ell are going to pay the tax,when the little dogs are on welfare.
    I am a union member and there were some years I paid $12,000 plus in tax,as well as many of my co-workers.

    All the people in big business and small business that write off dam near everything,even their newspaper hang on my friend.

    The working man cannot write off three martini lunches,gas mileage,company car,
    $300.00 suits as work clothes etc.

    If you have a business.

    Would you rather have it in a town,city, where most of the people make $50,000
    and up per year,or in a town,or city where everyone makes $6.00 per hour?


    Feel free to knock the Unions all you want.

    This could come back to haunt you.

    It may be nice to see some people have to pay more tax.
    I can promise you one thing,the politicans in Washington are not going to quite #issing the money away regardless of what party is in the White House.

    So for all the anti union people out there,my friend get your billfold out.


    Bo
     
  9. smartass

    smartass TS Member

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    Rocky, how about you naming one unionized industry that is still competitive?
     
  10. JOND

    JOND TS Member

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    Maybe the House and Senate would like to bar all secret political ballots !! Maybe they would like to have the results of such voters vote made public !! JOND
     
  11. smartass

    smartass TS Member

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    Construction, give me a break. That's hardly a unionized industry. I'll bet the perctage of unioned workers in the construction industry is in single digits.

    Thank you, sammie, for making my point by mentioning the Postal Service- a sorry operation if there ever was one. BTW, I'm an ex USPS unionized worker.

    Public schools are another great example of an industry which ain't doing too good- except that they are experts at wasting taxpayer money.

    Sambo, the others aren't industries, they are unions. Your blather is typical liberal tripe in the mold of Albore. Yes, unions get great benefits for their members until they kill the goose that laid the golden egg. The auto industry is a great example. The workers who are left have it made- for now.
     
  12. David Knapp

    David Knapp TS Member

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    Anonymous you are simply misinformed, I can forgive that.
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bill Nelson -I greatly fear that illegal aliens out number union members in the construction trades. I do respect your posting your name with your opinion.

    sammie - And what is wrong with working 12 hours per day six days a week. I own a small business and I wish I only had to work the restricted hours you cited. Perhaps I should require that my business become unionized so I would not have to work as much.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. rockshooter

    rockshooter TS Member

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    All you anti union people out there should at least thank a union member for the nickel above minimum wage you are making.
     
  15. ChairborneRanger

    ChairborneRanger Member

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    For what it's worth, before I "wised up" and went back to school, I worked at Pontiac Motor Division, GMC-----was a member of the UAW-----or as just about all of us in the plant said, "United Against Workers".
     
  16. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    This Bill is really not about whether Unions are good or bad, it is about putting workers at a disadvantage in making that choice in their particular workplace. A good analysis can be found at the link above.
     
  17. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed Member

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    If unions are a great and wonderful institution then wouldn't it logically follow that employees would use their SECRET ballot to vote in droves in favor of unionization.

    Why can't unions stand on their own without using the intimidation factor of open card signing campaigns. Keep the secret ballot and let the unions sink or swim on their honest merits.

    Am I missing something.....
     
  18. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    In a real democracy, elections are always by secret ballot.
     
  19. Rico46

    Rico46 TS Member

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    Anonymous, your right on the money. Every union you named has nothing but problems and has failed the smell test in being less effective than the non-union partners. Any time you have a group that is fully protected from shoddy work be it a factory or the school room you have a problem.

    This country needed unions to at the turn of the century to improve safety and child working laws and for that they should be rememered but since the 50's they rotted and lost their way. What Joe E said was correct! It's a group trying to make themselves look good while at the same time fleecing their brethern pockets.

    Rick
     
  20. rosies dad

    rosies dad Member

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    The crux of this is after a majority of workers sign for an election, under current law the Union has to leave till the election. BUT Management can and does begin a one sided campaign to instill fear misrepresent the choices to scare the workers out of voting for Union Representation. They do everything but threaten to fire them if they vote in a union for a way too long of period(6 months? till the election) In the meantime the Union cant say peep to the workers. What this is about is getting an election done before Management browbeats the workers out of wanting Union representation. The election could be held with a secret ballot, but without a manditory waiting period.
    So said CNN financial channel
     
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