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O/T computer help please

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by fritzi93, Jul 17, 2008.

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  1. fritzi93

    fritzi93 TS Member

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    You could try clearing the non-volatile memory, sometimes called CMOS.

    Power down the computer and unplug it. Open the computer and touch bare metal somewhere on the inside of case to discharge any static. Inside the comp is a disc-shaped battery about the size of a nickel. Pull it out of the slot, wait at least 10 seconds, then re-insert, re-attach power and boot up. Or use a jumper to clear it on the MoBo (you'll need the manual and a schematic for that method).

    Worth a shot. Good luck.
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Does it have a system restore option. If it does put in a date which is prior to your giving the computer to your friend. HMB
     
  3. bobdog

    bobdog Active Member

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    A Windows ME machine is old enough that the CMOS battery may have gone dead and needs to be replaced. Typically, the time gets reset, sometimes to 12:00AM 1-1-1980, but not always. What happens is that the battery is responsible for remembering CMOS information between sessions. When the battery dies, all the defaults are lost, including the drive type, and must be reset.

    They sell for less than $5.00, and it's a pretty easy fix. It's held in the socket with a spring terminal. Be careful not to break or bend this terminal.
     
  4. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    I second bobdog.
     
  5. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    rich-s

    Some of the older machines had larger batteries that could last a couple of decades. The usual CR2032 button cells used these days don't last all that long, but they are easily replaced and inexpensive. I've seen some of the old batteries cost more than a cheap motherboard these days.

    One other thing that may be the issue. If you aren't saving the changes and there had been a change made that would bring the system to setup upon booting, simply saving the changes before exiting could do the trick.
     
  6. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Shooting Jack

    The CR2032 is the most common battery used for the cmos backup in today's desktop motherboards. It fits 90% or more of them. Laptops are sometimes different and can vary widely. You can buy a battery at Wal Wart or Radio Shack. Even K Mart has them. It's an easy replacement once you locate it. It's like changing a watch battery. Just be careful to unplug the system before opening it up and touch (ground yourself) a metal part of the case before touching anything else. Take a look at the battery and take down the number. Go to the local store and pick one up.
     
  7. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Jackie: Your local Walgreen's or any drug store would have these. Same as the ones used in your car's remote door opener.

    I'm not sure 10 seconds is long enough for the CMOS to "lose" its programming.

    There is normally a 3-pin block with a jumper located near this CR2032 battery (should be printing on the motherboard that identifies it). You can simply remove the jumper, most likely on pins 2-3, and place it on pins 1-2. That shorts out the programming. After a bit (20-30 seconds to be safe), place the jumper back on the two pins you first saw it on.

    Incidentally, in 20 years I've never grounded myself while working on a system in my shop. Humidity typically is not very high here and very little static electricity. Just taking the cover off your system (before it's unplugged) should be enough to "ground" you. If you unplug the system BEFORE you remove the cover, then you'd not be grounded, and rubber-soled shoes would prevent grounding as well. Consequently, I don't bother with it and have NEVER had one stinking problem.

    Most problems arise through a modem connection. About 98% of the systems with bad boards come from users who are on a dial-up (modem) connection. Ma Bell does not do a good job of grounding their telephone lines, and on the telephone poles, they do get hit often with lightning.

    Lastly, I liked ME (I always referred to it as Windows 95 OSR3)... and M/S made a billion the days of its release.

    Whiz
     
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