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O/T-Cold Blue recommendations

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by i_shoot, Nov 17, 2008.

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  1. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    I refinished a Russian target rifle a few months ago & used Wheeler Engineering Pro bluing kit & it turned out great!!


    I just bought a BSA .22 & find out that Wheeler Pro Bluing has been discontinued.


    I researched several websites & heard great things about Brownells Oxpho Blue. Well I bought some & am disappointed to say the least. I only blued the Bolt & a few other small pieces but could never get them dark enough, even after 7 or 8 coats.


    I removed the blue from the bolt & other parts & tried Birchwood Casey blue & it was better but still not dark enough.
    I have been hearing good & bad about Blue Wonder & am thinking about trying it.


    The Wheeler Engineering blue was just exceptional & looked almost as good as a hot blue job. If anyone has any of the Wheeler cold blue solution that they want to sell I will take it.


    If not, then I would appreciate your recommendations on a good cold blue product.


    Thanks,
    i_shoot
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Try applying the cold blue with 0000 steel wool. HMB
     
  3. spritc

    spritc Active Member

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    I agree with hmb, allow the Perma blue paste time to react to the steel wool, 5 seconds or so then apply. You will be amazed.

    Steve
     
  4. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    hmb, tried that & it helped some but not much. Even tried applying heat before rubbing the blue on & that didn't help at all. I'm lost on why this isn't working unless it has something to do with the steel that this old rifle(1943) is made from.

    i_shoot
     
  5. larryjk

    larryjk Member

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    I recommend Brownell's Dicropan "IM". It is very versatile. Clean the metal first with acetone. Heat the metal before applying the solution, if using to blue a large area. Very useful as "touch-up" cold blue. Always clean the metal before using if you want good results.
     
  6. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    You have to clean the steel wool with a 409 type cleaner before you use it when using Oxpho Blue. You also put some 409 in a wide mouth container next to the Oxpho Blue in a wide mouth container. Dip a 1X1 inch or so square of cleaned 4/0 steel wool in the 409 and lightly squeeze it out. Then dip in the Oxpho Blue and apply, stroking in one directiion only. Washing the steel wool first strips the oil out of it, and having some mixed with the Oxpho Blue causes it to bite into the metal better.
     
  7. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    Thanks for all the help guys. I used acetone to clean the steel wool but will try 409 cleaner.
    Larryjk, I will dry the Dicropan IM as well.
    Keep the tips coming, I can use the help.

    Appreciate it,
    i_shoot
     
  8. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have had the best results applying Brownell's Dicropan to heated gun surfaces. A clean cloth worked as well as steel wool. It can take many coats. I would put on about three coats and then let the gun sit for a day. Scrub the gun with clean steel wool and do it again.

    I have done cold bluing, hot bluing and slow rust bluing. Each system requires some playing around to find a method that works for you.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. larryjk

    larryjk Member

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    I use a piece of sponge locked in medical forceps to apply the Dic IM to the heated metal. After it dries. put it in boiling distilled water for about 5 minutes. When you bring it out of the water it will have a coat of rust. I use a fine carding wheel to remove the rust. Then reheat the metal over the burner and apply another coat. By this method, you have a pretty decent color by 4 coats, indestructible and nice finish at about 8 coats.
     
  11. 870

    870 Well-Known Member

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    I've tried Birchwood Casey and Brownell's Oxpho Blue; I've tried heating the metal and unheated; used steel wool and cloth; have just about had the same results each time. Looks pretty good after several coats, but it always wears thin in very little use.

    Do you guys really get a good dark finish that holds up to even moderate use from a cold blue? I sure haven't.
     
  12. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Blue wonder is good stuff but you must, I repeat You must oil the gun down as directed after blueing or it will be covered with rust. Jackie B.
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    870- I certainly did not get as nice of blue job with cold blue as I got with a hot blue method. But, using bluing tanks gets really messy. I also did not get as nice of blue job with the hot tanks as I got with the slow rust method. Slow rust bluing took me at least 40 days.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. 870

    870 Well-Known Member

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    Pat, that slow rust bluing sounds like a fun project; I might not think that way afterwords, but it sounds interesting.
     
  15. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    Thanks for all the help. I appreciate it. Yes, cold bluing jobs can come out quite good, at least the first & only one I ever did turned out very nice. So nice in fact that I was shocked that it looked so good. I really couldn't tell much difference between it & the factory blue on some of my guns.
    That's why I can't understand why Wheeler Engineering discontinued the Premium cold bluing kit. Like Pat said, I used a cleaning patch soaked with the bluing solution & liberally coated the heated barrel until it wouldn't take any more color,rinsed it in a wallpaper pan filled with warm water,dried,cleaned with degreaser & carded with 0000 degreased steel wool & kept up this process until it would not take any more color. This is exactly how the directions were shown in the DVD video that came with the kit. It was quite easy to do.
    Like I said this was my first & only try but the results were very good in my opinion.
    I think I'll try some of the Dicropan you mentioned Pat.

    Thanks for all the help,
    i_shoot
     
  16. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    870- Slow rust bluing is slower but much simpler and very much cleaner than hot bluing. It does not require a lot of room or expense. The bluing tank is a 40 inch long wooden box made from pine (12 X 12 X 40) with 2-4 inches of wood shavings/sawdust on the bottom and the smallest light bulb you can find in the top lid. The other equipment need is a fine carding wheel or you could even use very fine, cleaned steel wool. You get to mix your own bluing solutions yourself. If interested, the book "Gunsmith Kinks vol 2" has instructions for several different methods.

    Slow rust is not a good method for a commercial gunsmith because it takes a long time. For home use, it is excellent. If you visit with a gunsmith who does a lot of hot blue work, he will tell you that the slow rust method will produce superior results but he would not use it unless he was working on something like a Purdey worth $50,000.

    If you are tempted to try it, always remember that the most important and difficult part of bluing a gun is polishing the metal correctly before you begin to blue it.

    Pat Ireland
     
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