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O/T---> Any Groundhog hunters here?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Setterman, May 29, 2007.

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  1. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the surrounding houses and backstops, a 22-250, 223, 204 at 250+yds or even a 22mag/.17 cal works at under 150yds. Sometimes if you whistle, they'll stand up, which is the best shot I prefer if their feeding in high grass or crops. Only need small bullets. Any of the 20 bores will rip em up.
     
  2. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    Apr 27, 2007
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    243, 222, 223, 220 swift, 6mm, 224, 22 Hornet, 6 BR, I had a friend who only had a 7mm Mag. You did not pick them up you raked them up. HE HE HE. Any cal will do with a groundhog. Pick one that you like.
     
  3. RLSS

    RLSS TS Member

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    John,

    Make sure you are properly licensed, and have WRITTEN PERMISSION from the landowner!!

    RLSS
     
  4. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    John, no need for camo for these critters, at least I never did. Good binos or spotting scope and bi-pod or shootin stix works too. I've used several calibers on whistle pigs, all the way from .22 rimfire to .32s and more in between. My favorite is a 6mm, made some extremely long shots with it in the pig fields. Your 22-250, either one or the Swift, will work just dandy. Hap
     
  5. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

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    yes, go to (lone star field products on) the internet. check out the dvd on the best log range portable rifle rest you can get. i am the eastern rep for the spec-rest out of pittsburgh. make sure when you go to the web site you click on all pictures. once you use one you will buy it. earl fairman
     
  6. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

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    243 out to 600 yards, 204 out to 400 yards, 6.5x284 out to 1100 yards.
     
  7. JRD

    JRD TS Member

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    Jan 31, 2007
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    Biggest thing I would watch for is your backstop. Lots of houses and buildings around. Its hard to even find long shots anymore. I grew up in Northern Ohio, have killed lots of chucks with 22-250 or the 243
     
  8. OhioBob

    OhioBob TS Member

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    You have got some good ideas above and some not mentioned. A good bipod and rear sandbag is all you really need. Rest the rifle on the cab roof or hood of a pickup truck if you can. The elevated position helps to find the chucks in hay fields and soybean fields which will be quite tall by that time of year here in Ohio. Also with an elevated position, your shooting down into the dirt rather than from a prone position. I let guys drive their trucks right into my fields as they are doing more good by killing chucks than running over a few beans.

    .22-250 is an all around great chuck gun....I have witnessed shots to 400 yards with one. Most of your shots will be 250 and under I suspect, just not too many places here to shoot 600 and over. In all of my fields, the longest shot I could have would be about 600 yards from one corner to the other far corner. You really won't need a range finder with a 22-250 if you're sighted in @200 yards...most shots will be dead on holds or top of the back.

    Some chucks stand up for a brief moment (2-5 secs) and once in awhile they will stand up for 20-30 seconds...you can never predict it. This will give a little room for error on the elevation as they are about 15 inches tall when standing.
    A hit anywhere with a 22-250 is devastating with light bullets.

    I would disagree with those who said a 7mm mag did a good job....I used to shoot a 25-06 and had more chucks run back to the burrow after punching a hole right through them with no bullet expansion....I got a Swift and immediately had more dropped dead right where they were shot.

    My real favorite is the 17 Remington....quite a bit quieter and you can see your shot go right to the chuck through the scope.

    The photo is daughter #1 with her first chuck shot at about 210 yards with the 17 Rem....she is also a trapshooter!

    Have fun....if you kill 'em all in SE Ohio come see me up north.

    Bob
     
  9. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

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    forget the prone position, the ants, the ticks, the sandbags, the bipod. Lone Star Field Products. Look at out DVD on the net.
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    We don't have groundhogs in Oregon. Instead, we have Rockchucks, which are techinically Yellow Bellied Marmots. They are a 2/3rds to 3/4 scale groundhog.<br>
    <br>
    Any of the centerfire .22's will work, though some work better than others. The .22 Hornet is on the low end. The .22-250 is the best all around. In heavy wind conditions, the .243 works quite well. The most popular is the .223, and not surprisingly it's the cheapest for ammo. I'll tell you this - a .223 will knock a rockchuck over, but I've often seen a .22-250 pick one up clean off its feet and slam it into the rimrock behind it. And the number that take a dive into their burrows after being hit decreases as you "use more gun". Another consideration is the amount of recoil the cartridge puts out. In most guns, the .223 is light enough that even with a scope cranked up to 20x you can still observe the impact. With the .22-250, recoil has increases to the point that with some guns, the scope picture will be thrown off target. You'll need a spotter. With more powerful cartridges, like the .220 Swift, .243 and .25-06, a spotter is all but a must. As for the .17's, they're on the light side here for distance and wind, and it's often windy.<br>
    <br>
    Camo may or may not be needed. If the rockchucks are "educated" by heavy hunting, camo may be needed. There are some popular places I've hunted where you must be prone and under cover or fully camo'd.<br>
    <br>
    For many shots here, a bipod is often a good idea. I have bipods in various sizes, but find a short one works best because I'm usually prone. One thing that is a must is a scope sunshade - I find I'm often shooting nearly into the sun.<br>
    <br>
    My Rockchuck Rifle is a Browning 1885 Single Shot in .22-250 with a Leupold 6.5-20X 40mmAO scope with target knobs.
     
  11. avidtrapshooter

    avidtrapshooter TS Member

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    hunted groundhogs alot as a kid and still shoot em off the property, 22-250 is the perfect gun for the job, just get a bipod lean against a truck or roof of car and you are set. use bullets that expand rapidly to prevent ricochet. wait for em to stand nice and straight you can't miss em then aim at the head or just above and i would say you are set to 350 yds. a 22-250 will wreak havoc on them no matter where you hit em i have seen anything from heads blown off to blown clean in half from the stomach down. gotta love 50-55 grain hollow points.
     
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