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O/T Any concrete contractors on here?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by new loader, Feb 7, 2009.

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  1. new loader

    new loader Member

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    My driveway is 11 years old. For last 3-4 years it has heaved up during cold weather. Normally, it is lower than the garage floor by the same amount. Total movement from low to high is about 1" Last summer I dug out all debris in the crack and installed new expansion joints and filled with flexible crack filler. Is this something I have to live with year after year? It creates a dam and all the melting ice & snow from vehicles cannot drain out.

    <a href="http://s44.photobucket.com/albums/f26/newloader/?action=view&current=drive1.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    <a href="http://s44.photobucket.com/albums/f26/newloader/?action=view&current=drive2.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
     
  2. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    I don,t know how you can fix that with out a totaly new slab . My pad move,s but not like that maybe 1/4 inch and always goes back and yes it is cold here to . A garage floor should never drain out side in the winter .
     
  3. nailer123

    nailer123 TS Member

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    I not a concrete contractor but im in the building trades. I have a lot of driveways that look like that .I even have some basements that have rised and crack we had a wet fall.I think it is something that you will have to live with .Just try and keep the cracks full so not so much water gets under and hope for warm weather.
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    When the ground freezes, it expands and something has to go up. You could put a footer below the frost line under the joint and stop the problem or you could sell your home and move South. Actually, moving might be cheaper than footers under your driveway.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    Pats right. Its moisture freezing below the slab and pushing it up. If there is a way to drain it with a tile the moisture wouldn't have a chance to freeze as it would go away.
     
  6. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    That's they call them floating slabs. (no footer]
     
  7. Lead Man

    Lead Man TS Member

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    Cut 12" line across the front of the driveway remove all the old concrete. Dig a footer across the front, below the frost line. Take a hammer drill with a 1\2" inch bit and drill hole along the exposed concrete. Cut pieces of rebar and drive them into the holes leaving about 6" sticking out. Pour new concrete with a built in drain and grate ( can be bought at Lowes or Home Depot) that you place in the concrete . You can go down the sides a little ways if you want.

    Just remember that the concrete WILL crack in another spot. There are 2 kinds of concrete. The one kind with a crack and the other kind that will eventually crack.
     
  8. M-16

    M-16 TS Member

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    If water gets under the slab and freezes it will raise. Couple of things you can do possibly. install drains along side to keep water from getting under. No help if their is a spring under the slab though. Does garage floor water run out the door to the slab? If so other poster noted installing drain in front of doors. If you can keep the ground dry under the slab it will help. A properly installed slab designed not to move would have 2' of stone underneath or footers to get below the frost line.
     
  9. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    Lead man has most right But if you dont stop the expansion the rebar will break the garge floor. Cut about 6ft of concrete out and put a minium of 6in lime stone under before you repour. Use the 1/2in expansion foam and seal on top
     
  10. kolar12

    kolar12 Member

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    On a related subject, how do you get the black organic like stuff off of the surface of the concrete? Pressure washing removed the cream from the top. Bleach and TSP help somewhat but does not get rid of the problem. Ideas?
     
  11. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    new loader, where do you live? Specific please.
     
  12. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    MY driveway had a crack in it so I had it taken out and driveway pavers put in, Hell I got cracks all over the place now ... lol ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  13. whiz-bang

    whiz-bang Active Member

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    Seven year ago I built a 30 by 40 garage. I live in Minnesota. My foundation is 8 inch by 18 footing and 5 courses of 8 inch block. During back filling I filled not only the inside of the garage with screened sand but also the entire length of the front side of the garage with screened sand. Power tamped the entire area. Then hand dug in a 4 inch drain tile and covered with 3/8 drain rock and covered with filter cloth. I also installed in floor heat inside the garage. When we poured the concrete we used no expansion joint at all. The concrete in front of my garage is 40 by 40. So far no sign of frost heaving. And I don't expect any.

    I am a excavating contractor and dig many basements. Through out the years I have seen a lot of my competition back fill the front of garages and fill the garages with the same material they dug out instead of using a granular sand. I feel that is a mistake and leads to the problem of not only frost heaving concrete during the cold season but also causes settling of the slab during the rest of the year. To me this is cutting corners to be low bid or no experience.

    Bottom line new loader is you have a moisture problem.
     
  14. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Whiz-Bang and the Pheasantmaster are the 2 you want here. Professional and experienced. Shoot well and often while we can. Bob
     
  15. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    I'm a mason and I have a gravel driveway. No worries.
     
  16. new loader

    new loader Member

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    pheasantmaster: check your PM.
     
  17. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    When your contractor poured your driveway, he probably did not backfill the garage foundation with stone, like #6's. The edge of your slab is bearing on the foundation backfill which should have been clean, compacted stone all the way down to a drain tile beside your footing. Any earth excavated for the footing should have been backfilled with stone if concrete was being poured over it. Your drive way should have at least 6" of stone under it as well. It allows complete compaction and some cushion when frost reacts on the slab from the underside.

    You have an expensive fix. All you can do is remove the concrete, dig down to the footing depth and remove the crap soil and replace it with compacted stone.
    NOT SAND. Sand holds moisture and swells when frost does it's thing.

    Drilling rods into the foundation to "support" the pad is problematic. Over time the frost will either crack your concrete at each rod, or bust the top 4 inches out of your foundation where the rods were inserted.
     
  18. whiz-bang

    whiz-bang Active Member

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    Setterman screened granular sand drains very nicely. As a matter of fact it drains so well we are required to use it to build mound septic systems. I have no idea what #6 rock is. Around here the slab or garage apron is supported by the garage foundation wall "frost wall" 8 inch block. Some block layers will lay a top course of corball block for a even better shelf to help support the slab like a brick ledge. 4 to 6 inches of class 5 or road rock under the slab.
     
  19. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    You do not pour on sand-sand holds water limestone dont
     
  20. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    If sand worked the road builders would use it. NO SAND
     
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