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O/T 7mm-08 or 25-06

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Kolarmaxx, Jan 16, 2008.

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  1. Kolarmaxx

    Kolarmaxx TS Member

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    My young son and I are looking for a good all around hunting caliber to hunt boar up to whitetail. Do I go with the 7mm-08 or the 25-06? My 11 year old son shoots a 12 guage trap gun 3 days a week, so recoil isn't such an issue.
    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Both great choices. My preference would be the 7-08 because I like the bigger bullets but in real world terms it probably doesn't make much difference. The rifle/optic package is where the difficult choices come in.
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    A badly placed 25-06 can wreck a lot of venison.

    I like the short action 7mm-08 in this case. If I was hunting antelope I would use the 25-06.

    HM
     
  4. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    7-08
     
  5. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

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    If I was going to have just one do as much as possible hunting rifle, it would be .30 cal, and it would be either the .308 Winchester or the .30-06 Springfield.

    Of the two calibers you listed, I would choose the 7mm-08.

    ~Michael
     
  6. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    25-06

    The trajectory is better- it truly is a magnum caliber without the belt- and has one of the best trajectory charts going

    The BC of the 117 grain bullets - particurally the boat tails is as high as you are going to find in practical terms

    With a well constructed 117 or 120 grain bullet it will handle an elk. With lower weight bullets- it can even be used for varmits

    They tend to be more accurate but that is an individual rifle and load situation for sure

    regards from the great state of Iowa

    Gene
     
  7. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    My personal favorite is the 308. Of the choices you gave, and the purposes for the rifle, I would go with the 7mm/08. For "boar to whitetail", I would go with Remington's 7mm/08.

    Like the 308, it would be hard to NOT come up with a good load. You can load a wide spectrum of bullet weight. If you do not load, the 140 gr will do what you want.

    Last but not least, the short action will result in a shorter, lighter, handier package for a young shooter.
     
  8. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

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    I'm currently looking to change a Mauser to a 25-06. I did look at the 7mm-08. I just decided I could get a little more out of the 25-06 for my needs. Either gun would be good. You have done a very good job of selecting two calibers.

    The .308 Win. is a viable alternative. In one of my .257 guns, I shoot the 100 grain Nosler, and it's unbelievable what it did to the spine of a deer. Michael
     
  9. GRR

    GRR TS Member

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    I like the 25-06.....100gr for deer 120 for elk very little recoil and 30-06 brass is easy to find and neck down. 100gr at 3850 fps it don't get no better
     
  10. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    Shot placement is always key but it's nice to have horsepower for when that doesn't happen. The best plans of mice and men often go astray....... and then it's nice to have a 30 caliber. I have a friend who killed two elk on a bet with a 22-250. He shot both in the head and just turned the heads to mush. He is an excellent shot and a patient man. I suspect that a 7mm/08 would be the better choice of the two but I grew up with a bull barreled Ruger 77 in 22/250 and I killed a pile of deer with it. No pigs where we live.Jeff
     
  11. steele

    steele TS Member

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    GRR, Are you sure you're getting 3850 out of a 100 grain 25/06??. That's about 500 FPS faster than any loading manual I have. I've been shooting 25s for years & the best I ever got was 3650 from a 257 Wby mag. Just curious if there was something new available
     
  12. redix

    redix TS Member

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    ,308 would be my choice: very accurate even over 300 yards, wide range of bullet weights, wide range of game.
     
  13. edthearcher

    edthearcher Member

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    25-06 I hand load and would hate to guess how many wis. white tail deer I have droped with a 90 grain bullet
     
  14. easy100

    easy100 TS Member

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    The 25-06 is your best choice cause as your son get older he will like the down range energy it has. It is much flatter shooting gun than the 7mm-08 and will kill a hog in a heart beat. Just shoot the 117 to 120 gr bullits and go ahead and shoot the hog in the shoulder it will drive these bullit out the other side. That way if he runs you will have a blood trail that you can follow I promise you. The 25-06 I have shot for 25yrs it has alot more killing power than most people think. Lots of luck.
     
  15. coyote268

    coyote268 TS Member

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    I have been shooting a 25-06 for over thirty years so it would be my first choice but the 7-08 is also an excellent caliber. If I went tothe seven I would probably just go to the 308 as it has heavier bullet weights. My Daughter shoots a Sako 308 with a limbsaver recoil pad and handles it just fine. This is her pig and elk gun. Her other one for deer etc. is a 25-06.
    Dan
     
  16. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Time for a little sanity check here. Assuming you are not going to handload to such levels you risk a burst barrel or a worn out barrel after only 12 shots, there is not a lot of difference here.

    Take Federal Premium Vital-Shok ammo. Their P708C 7mm-08 load has a Barnes 140gr TSX bullet leaving the muzzle at 2820fps and retaining 2162fps at 30 yards with 1452ft/lb of energy.

    The P2506H 25-06 load has a 100gr Barnes TSX bullet leaving the muzzle at 3210fps and retaining 2536fps t 300 yards with 1428 ft/lb of energy remaining.

    If you try for a 115gr 25-06 load you are smack dab in the middle with 100ft/lb less energy at 300 yards.

    So to chose between these two outstanding loads, you are reduced to deciding whether 1.9" less drift at 300 yards in a 10MPH crosswind is decisive, or whether 2.3" less drop at 300 yards with a 200 yard zero is decisive.

    Hell, the 7mm Mauser (7x57) is more than enough gun for what Kolarmaxx wants to use it for (handloaded, of course).

    So here is how you should decide. If you shoot 1oz @ 1290fps for handicap, because speed kills, then get the 25-06. If you shoot 1 1/8oz @1200 or 1235fps, because more weight gives you a better chance, go with the 7mm-08.
     
  17. jimbotrap

    jimbotrap TS Member

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    Last year while hunting elk with a fine gentlemen, we had two bulls out in front of us. The first, according to our rnage finder, almost 400 yards. We both hit him, but the my hunting partner that day shot a 25.06. Both of hit the Elk a little low in the chest cavity, no noticiable result. His 3rd hit the bull just behind the front shoulder (quartered to us) went completely through and broke the left hip. His next shot was more broadside. He hit him just behind the shoulder, went completely through him, damage to vital organs and broke his shoulder on the opposite side. Needless to say one fatal blow.

    The second bull came out about same yardage, I hit him twice, one shot a little low just behind the rib cage (on a quartering animal on full gallup), went into liver etc. and did not exit. Second broke his right foot. We finally caught up to him, he walked right in front of me at 50 yards. Shot him slightly to rear of left shouler. Bullet hit vital organs but did not exit. (Same as first shot) But I was shooting a 7MM Weatherby Mag. The 25.06 had much better results. So pick you caliber. Next year I will stay with my 25.06. Been very successful on lots of deer, and after seeing results on a 6 point bull I am convinced it is all the gun you will ever need to hunt in the U. S. - Jim
     
  18. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Halfmile - the 25-06 can destroy a lot of venison up close. Worse, many of the bullets will not properly expand at long range. A classic example is are Remingtons. I did a perfect shot on a doe at a measured 365 yards. The bullet went in right behind her left shoulder, and exited out her right hauunch without expanding. Even went through her liver, and the liver was not bloodshot. You could eat right up to the bullet hole. I only use my 25-06 with varmint bullets now for coyotes. One other thing about the 25-06 is that it needs a longer barrel than most rifles to effectively burn the powder. Generally a 26" is best. Mine has a 30" barrel, and I'm getting increased velocity with it.

    The 7-08 is good, but anything it can do, the common 308 can do better. It's my opinion that .30 calibers are far more flexible because more bullet choices are offered, especially if you handload. And the .30 cals generally have the best average accuracy of any caliber. The .308 is accurate with 110 grainer up to 180 grainers. The 130 grainers make good coyote rounds. For deer, the 150 and 165 work well.

    Frankly, if I had it to do over, I'd take a .270 over the .25-06 for deer.

    And I'd take a .308 over a 7-08 any day of the week.

    BTW, my son shot his first deer last fall with a Rem 788 in .308. I could have gotten him any caliber and any gun, but the .308 is just as good as any deer cartridge and better than most.
     
  19. BuckGuru

    BuckGuru Member

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    I like the 7-08 in my Encore pistol with 15 inch barrel. I shoot Sierra SSP 130 grain handloads in it. The cartridge and gun shoot better than I do, but of the 3or 4 deer I have shot it at, none of them ran more than a few yards.

    In case you weren't aware of it (you probably were), the 7mm-08 Remington is derived from the .308 Winchester cartridge necked down to 7mm (.284).

    For my rifle, I prefer the .30-06.
     
  20. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    I'll second the .270 a great all around gun for anything that needs killing in the lower 48

    I'm a lever-gun fanatic and have on order a new Marlin .308...this may change my mind and be all I'll ever need...except for my 45-70 of course
     
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