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Not hyper hunting dogs?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mallard2, Sep 25, 2011.

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  1. mallard2

    mallard2 Active Member

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    There has been good discussions of best pointer, best retriever, and more about good dog breeds on this site.

    Let me ask another type of question.

    What hunting breeds are best suited to being family dogs also? Adequate in the field and or water, but good around kids and the house?

    Any individual dog may have a certain personality, we all know, but which breeds are not quite so hyper as some of the spaniels, big pointers, etc?

    Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  2. skeeter1956

    skeeter1956 Member

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    i have bred and hunted over gsp's and labradors [the australian/english lab's] and find the lab's to be a much calmer dog in general than the gsp's. my thoughts only but for waterwork i find the lab in the right hands to be hard to beat. cheers des
     
  3. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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  4. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    In every breed there are hyper dogs and laid back dogs. If the stud and bitch are calm, usually the pups are too. Visit with the seller and watch the breeding pair. After about 4 years, most settle down. Exposure to lots of people and places definitely helps. Nothing worse than being kenneled all day. Usually a house raised dog is a calmer dog because it's exposed to more action.
     
  5. oskerspap12

    oskerspap12 Active Member

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  6. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    IMO- I vote for the lab-The best dogs come from field trial lines and are a hand full at times, but they train easier & will take the pressure and not quit.
     
  7. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Golden Retrievers make the best family dogs, and hunt like hell if taught, which is easy.

    HM
     
  8. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    It takes between 18 months to 2 years for a pup to calm down. Until then, any dog with strong hunting instincts is liable to be excitable. After they get some age on them they calm down and become easy to live with.

    My 17 month old Setter was a real handfuil until recently. Now he has become biddable and obedient and easy to live with. He is easy to walk on a lead and has an easy relationship with both his sire and dam. No more chewing, jumping, or other obstreperous behavior. What did I do to accomplish this? Nothing other than what I had previously done. He just needed the time to mature.
     
  9. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    sometimes the puppies can get a bit out of control....


    frankc_2008_030364.jpg
     
  10. buster45

    buster45 Active Member

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    German Shorthair they love people great family dogs...like all breeds some are laid back some are not. I prefer females they seem to come around a little quicker.GSP's were bred to be all purposedogs will water retreive and point.

    My second choice would be Labs.

    Buster
     
  11. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    Labs can't be beat in my opinion. What other dog is as easily trained, good in the uplands as well as waterfowl hunting and as good of a family pet? Golden's are great dogs as well but harder to gegt a good one anymore. The breed has been destroyed by the show ring. Goldens from goodhunting blood lines will run a close second to a lab. GSP are great as well but they are far from a duck dog. Jeff
     
  12. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    P.S The hyper bit is a puppy being a puppy. Proper training and exercise will help on the hyper end but time is the ultimate healer of hyper! Look.. You really don't want to own a dog that isn't spirited as a puppy. You want a dog that has lots of desire when it comes to all things hunting related. Jeff
     
  13. magnumshot

    magnumshot Active Member

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    Labrador is the most popular breed. The one I just got is a natural. I believe the secret to assuring a good dog, any dog, is getting one from a reputable breeder early at 7-8 weeks. A breeder that took the time to breed the dogs for a certain type, either show, field, or both, and taught the puppies about noises and surfaces so they're not skittish. If you want a dog with a ton of stamina, get one from a field trial background. If you know how to train, and then take all the time necessary to train, you will have a great dog. I just came in from training my english lab pup. 15 minutes repeated of sit & stay, then throwing his dummy with him staying, then having him make the retrieve. I do this several times a day, and add new things every week. I've got him going over jumps, up and down steep ramps, walking planks, doing retrieves, and blind retrieves. Just yesterday I started adding a whistle to the come call at a retrieve. He is running like the wind, but hasn't got the stopping down to well yet. Good thing the ground is soft from all the rain. So far my boy has learned a few parlor tricks, has got the paper every day in the past month. His daily job and he loves it. I taught him to walk in heel, and he will do it without the leash in the yard, but I won't do this without the leash in the street yet. I trained him the perimeter of my property, and he hasn't wandered beyond it yet. He's got a great nose, and I'm teaching him to use it to find grouse, which is what I want. He loves plowing through thick brush, and will climb through a stick pile to get his dummy. This dog is just under 5 months, and it just amazes me in how fast he learns. I'm putting in my time, and after having a previous lab, my whole family is on board with family dog training. I think most any dog can be a good dog if trained right, or has a natural inclination to please. had a friend that had a chiuaua as his hunting companion. The dog would flush pheasants and bunnies out of the hedgerows.
     
  14. Garry

    Garry Active Member

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    "What hunting breeds are best suited to being family dogs also? Adequate in the field and or water, but good around kids and the house?"

    Since you implied that you will be hunting this dog, I do not recommend buying any breed with a show or bench bloodline. Yes, I know that there are some who are dual champions but they are the exception.

    Based on your question above, my suggestion would be an English Springer Spaniel bred for the gun. Check out the URL above.

    I am getting up there in years but if I decide to buy another gun dog it will be a small size Allenby ESS. Currently I own a small size (36lb.) 9yr. old Gordon Setter who is a good bird dog and an excellent house dog who is great with children.

    Like most dogs, English Springer Spaniels, Gordon Setters, and Golden Retrievers thrive best in situations where they are included in the family and not kept confined to either an outdoor or indoor kennel most of the time. They need and love your company and affection.
     
  15. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Pups still available :)

    305023456.jpg
     
  16. UpNorthMN

    UpNorthMN Active Member

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    Go lab.

    We have a field trial bred English Springer Spaniel and just lost a English lab. The Springer is a bird finding machine, very affectionate, smart and easy to train. But he is wired and does not have the off switch in the house. My late lab was a mellow fellow in the house, but I dumb as a bag of rocks in the field. I purchased him from a kennel that bred for show, so that was my fault for not doing more research before the buy.

    We'll be replacing our lab with a British Lab.

    In my talks with at least 10 lab kennels in the past two weeks I have been told that the British Labs are bred for the field/hunting, where the English labs are more for the bench/show.

    If you want one for the field my experience tells me that if you are looking for a kennel to buy from and the web site pics show the dog in the ring, move on and find one that hunts their dogs.
     
  17. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    Unfortunately, the labrador breed is being ruined at an alarming rate by their show ring popularity and backyard breeders.

    Seems like a breed starts to go downhill as soon as the AKC gets their "function follows form" policy going strong. Look what they've done over the years to goldens, cockers and springers! They make good family dogs but have trouble finding their food dish and get lost at the end of their leash!

    Compare one of the few remaining field goldens to the show version. The big dome-head puffballs that the AKC call "breed standard" are an absolute disgrace.

    Whatever breed you decide on, make sure you investigate thoroughly, get references and spend time with the pup so you know what your getting (and getting into!)
     
  18. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    magnumshot, you'll wind up with a great hunting companion and friend!! Good job guy!

    Garry, the Gordon Setter is still one of the lessor known great foot hunter upland hunting dogs! Like mentioned above, they are a people dog also and do better spending time around the family and not stuck away in a kennel out back.

    Any breed of puppies will be rambunctious till after the terrible twos!

    I'm now owned by a little French Brittany that lives in my home as a family member. One of the best quail finding/pointing machines I've ever hunted with! I named her Gidget Bardo :)

    Hap
     
  19. teddy34

    teddy34 TS Member

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    I have had Lab, Brittany, Springer, Golden, and now 3 Llewellin Setters
    (Hunting with Hank fame). All were spirited puppies, but none hyper in the
    house. I liked them all, but my favorite is the Llewellins. They are
    known for being bred to hunt fot the walking hunter (many upland field trials
    are from horse back and dogs are bred to run too big). It depends on whether
    you want a flushing dog or pointing. If pointing, Llewellin's are hard to
    beat. Gary Owen
     
  20. straightsixes

    straightsixes TS Member

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    It depends on what you are hunting.

    Lots of upland game up and down the mountains in the heat? There are some great pointing dogs out there that will keep going long after you want to climb back in the truck. Doesn't do much good to have a flushing dog when the grouse want to escape from the other side of the mountain you are currently walking up. What is your standard cover you are hunting... that can make a difference in the dog chosen.

    Waterfowl? While other breads do well, for the hardcore waterfowler who spends umpteen days in the marsh/rice/big water its hard to beat a labrador or chessie. Lets face it just about any breed can hunt a couple times a year and be satisfactory. For the dogs that mark for 1/4 mile, hand signal out in the wind, break ice, retrieve in conditions that no human would get through, do it as hunting/guide dogs on a daily basis... its hard to beat the labs/chessies.

    I grew up with goldens over the years and switch to labradors about 20 years ago. Its pretty easy to find a dumb golden (my dad was 2 for 3 on that) but his one good hunting golden was excellent. There are more and more of these being seen in the hunt test world because at least in our area more inexperienced women choose them to train with. Some of those dogs are excellent as well. I absolutely hated after the hunt sessions pulling burrs out by the hundreds. Labs can go in the exact same field and get 1 to 2 burrs. Been there and done that.

    Even my worst hunting labrador was comparable with my fathers best Golden. My best labrador well... its not even close. Drive, power, swimming, instinct, knowing where the bird is when I swear it dropped somewhere else... she has save my butt many times.

    Some females are ALPHA FEMALES. Be warned. They can be aggressive towards other dogs and very protective of their families (and whomeer they consider family). They can be a lot of dog to handle (ummm by the way this one took 7 years to calm not 2) but the good far outways the bad. And a little training to harness those instincts goes a long ways.

    As far as male/female... If you would have asked me a year ago it would have been female all the way. HOWEVER: Picked up a well trained male this past spring... holy smokes at 2 years old he is very polished (after a lot of hours of us training together)and well mannered. Doesn't do the humping thing and immediately settled in with the family. Sure he is a bit scared of the alpha female but he is WAY better than I expected (all the way around). So don't give up on either sex of dog.
     
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