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noble primers

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dolphin62, Sep 17, 2009.

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  1. dolphin62

    dolphin62 Member

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    I bought a lot of noble primers this summer and really like them. I'm fairly new to reloading and I have a question about these primers. I know these are suppose to be able to exchange with winchester primers( winchester knoc offs).

    my question is will these primers be alright in the winter weather..will they be hot enough and give off enough pressure. Or will I have to use real winchester primers in the cold weather.

    I know you get what you pay for but these nobles seem to be a great primer....never had one misfire in about 3000 rounds loaded and fired.
     
  2. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    They will ( in my experience with them) not shoot well in the winter with perodic soft sounding loads. I have had ( I bought 5000 and have shot 1800) many misfires that go off the second time and many soft sounding loads. Most of this is in cold weather. The other thing you face is they are slightly larger and will render your hulls useless for other primers. Bottom line is and you said it, you get what you pay for.
     
  3. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I had trouble with them being oversized and they did not perform well in many loads in cold weather. Hodgdon no longer states that they are interchangeable with the Winchester. No idea why, they just deleted that statement for some reason.

    If you are worried about cold weather performance, you can put some loaded shells in the freezer for a day or so and then run them over a chronograph while still cold. Keep a few at room temp for a comparison. I got MANY off sounding loads. There was a wide variation in velocities and some were 150 fps less than the others. Using the Winchester primers resolved the issue. I pass these Nobel Sports up whenever I buy primers. They ARE less expensive, but they aren't a bargain if they don't perform well. They did not do well for me, so therefore I don't buy them. If they work for you, have at it.
     
  4. nords

    nords Member

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    I don't know about cold weather (below 40), but they work as goo as WIN's. The group here has shot 50,000 no problems. I've had more WIN's not fire then N.S.
     
  5. poacherjoe

    poacherjoe Well-Known Member

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    I think the people that have had problems due to cold weather need to post the temp.I have had no problems with them but I don't shoot them below 30 degrees! Maybe if you shoot in colder temps there may be a problem
     
  6. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    poacherjoe

    I noticed the issue when shooting from about 45 degrees on down with the Nobel Sport Primers. It was a 1 oz load using Red Dot in older AA hulls with the Winchester wad. I regularly test loads at somewhere between 10 and 25 degrees as a part of my routine process these days. It's a direct result of having issues with loads that usually perform well at more normal temps. I have weeded out many questionable loads and usually have no trouble in colder weather. I started doing that sort of testing on rifle and handgun ammo years ago. It made sense to test shotgun shells that way also. I've had poor results with a few types of factory ammo as well. Not ALL loads do poorly, but enough of them seem to have trouble. When a certain primer or other component do poorly in a good number of loads, I tend to not use those particular components. I know what loads I will be using in the winter. It's one less thing to worry about.
     
  7. glenns

    glenns Member

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    How much are the Noble primers?

    Have you tried the Fiocchi 616 primers?
     
  8. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    I have loaded 50,000+ of these primers without problem. I live in Florida so the cold is not a problem. I suspect that if you kept you ammo in a warm place and not allow it to cold soak you will not have a problem.

    These are great primers and I use them almost exclusively.

    Tom
     
  9. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    I got 20 flats of Noblesport 1 oz @1200 for cooler weather shooting. Guess Italian soldiers have to use Winchester primers if they expect to go to the Alps.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  10. tallpaul

    tallpaul Member

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    Up here in the Northeast, we have the Eastern CT Skeet league that runs from October to April. I see guys during the coldest months take shells out of their trunk that have been in there overnight, go out and start shooting all sorts of honkers, wheezers and generally punky shells. Then someone else comes over, and right away starts asking about what components these bad shells are loaded with. Now you have a few more guys get into mix, and before you know it, everything from inferior wads, foreign primers, and "That no-good-so-and-so" powder company gets all the blame. If the shooter just used what little brains he was given, he'd know not to let his shells get that cold in the first place. I keep my shells inside, then in the cabin of my vehicle, then in my shooting pouch with an over-sized hand warmer in with them. Problem solved.
     
  11. Alno

    Alno TS Member

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    Why are the primers solely to blame? Could a better cold weather powder be formulated? Shouldn't the chemical composition of the powder have something to do with poor cold weather ignition?

    My old notes have: Nitroglycerine melting at 13.2 degrees Centigrade (approx 56 degrees Fahrenheit) but is explosive when solid (J.N.Bradley, "Flame & Combustion Phenomena", 1969, p143ff).
    Nitrocellulose igniting at 160-170 deg.C with a flash point of 40 deg.F. And
    Trinitrotoluene melting at 80.1 deg C (approx 176 deg F). All three are categorized as sensitive 'explosives'.


    Anyone have any of the missing or corrected values or better data? Any chemical engineers shoot trap? At what temperatures have these theorized 'detonations' occurred?
     
  12. RC1946

    RC1946 TS Member

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    I have not had any problems with the nobel primer in cold weather as compared to any other primer other than they are made of hard material and you will need a hard hammer fall to ignite them as with the CCI, Cheddite,and Fiocchi which are also hard. Federal, I have found to be the softest, Ballistic Products sells a hull reforming tool that you can use to forge the primer pocket back to 209 dimensions to use Winchester, federal and CCI. I did some measuring on different hulls and machined one out tool steel that works very well. If you intend to use different brands of primers you will want to invest in one of these tools. Contact Ballisticproducts.com. Hope this helps. Robert
     
  13. psfive

    psfive Member

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    I have loaded many many thousand of them and never had a problem I could soley blame on the Nobel primer. I can also tell you I have heard what I took to be an off sounding reports from guys uho use nothing but the best (brand name ) componets. I'll keep on buying and using them as long as I get them. Paul
     
  14. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    seemed "hot" to me and also ruined my AA hulls for loading again with anything but the nobels...oversized the primer pocket. I reserve them for Dianas and Kemens which I only reload once. I also cut the powder a grain when using them and they seem like the AA reloads I've been shooting for a zillion years.
     
  15. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I also had no problems with 5,000 of them in cold weather in Iowa. I loaded cheddites in behind them and they seem to stay in as well. They did enlarge the pocket slightly, but they hold the new primer still.
     
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