1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

newbie trap question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by TW2, May 4, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. TW2

    TW2 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    Messages:
    18
    i have gotten back into trap after a long hiatus and am using a new gun that fits a whole lot better than my old one

    i can almost tell now that when i pull the trigger whether or not i am going to nail the bird or just wing it

    except for the straight away shots that is- i miss the ones that i figure i have dead to rights

    it takes me a little longer than most guys because i have an eye dominance conflict (and my eyes are 55 years old)and i need to mount the gun after the bird flies so i can pick it up better- this part of it seems to be working much better than premounting it

    the range does have a prevailing wind into your face, so they tend to float up a bit
    but i have read in a couple of books that you need to shoot the straight away birds lower because they will have dropped by the time the shot intercepts the target

    generally speaking, how do any of you handle this type of shot?
     
  2. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,060
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    You might want to have one of the better shooters at your club assist you in this matter. It is extremely hard to give good sound advice on a forum. You might get a lot of it, but that can lead to confusion. Definitely not pre-mounting your gun is not a good technique. You must have the gun in the correct position before calling for the target. If you feel you aren't picking up the target quick enough, you might try holding a lower gun. In many cases when a person misses a straight away; it is because they lifted their head off the stock. No, you shouldn't be shooting under the target to compensate for target drop. You should be shooting it on the rise. What type of gun do you have? (Field, Sporting, Trap)?? Again, ask a good shooter at your club to help you with the basics. By knowing the basics it gives you something to build off of. Good Luck Ed
     
  3. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,049
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    I'm a bit older than you and on "staright aways" I cover the target and pull the trigger. You might try it and see if that works.
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    TW2- You posted "i have read in a couple of books that you need to shoot the straight away birds lower because they will have dropped by the time the shot intercepts the target".

    This is new to me. What books? All targets should fall due to gravity at the same rate. If you are shooting falling targets you need to make some adjustments.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    Ed provided some excellent advice. Depending on how high your gun shoots (the pattern's point of impact compared to the gun's point of aim) you may need to cover straight-away targets to break them, assuming you aren't raising your head to see targets better or to watch them break.

    I strongly agree that pre-mounting your gun has definite benefits and that holding a lower gun (on the center of the trap house for example) would be something to try. Then look a foot or two above the house to a point in the horizontal center of the range of target flight paths at the approximate distance where targets can be seen clearly and not just a streak. (This is known as a "soft focusing" with the eyes; it is a learned technique.)

    Straight-aways are commonly missed targets. Many shooters try to shoot them too quickly and fail to swing smoothly. Others can't wait to see them break and raise their heads to make sure they see it, which, often they don't because they shot over it.
     
  6. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,060
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I'd just like to add, that many newer shooters have a tendency to aim the shotgun, (Similar to shooting a rifle). You just can't do that. It seems that newer shooters aim the gun even more when they have missed a number of targets. You should not be aware of that front sight when attempting to shoot the target. The gun should shoot where you look. Another question might be; do you use 2 eyes or one when shooting? As long as you are learning you might want to keep both eyes open if possible. I admit some very good shooters use the one eye method. However, many times it is because they shoot right handed and have a dominant left eye. (or the other way around). But again, I can't stress enough to have a knowledgeable shooter watch you and give "proper" direction. Once you learn the basics, you can then go from there. Don't start practicing using bad techniques. Ed
     
  7. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    190
    I agree with everything that has been said in this thread except I will say it in much stronger terms.

    #1. If you EVER want to aspire to a point where you are breaking more clay targets than the average “Rabbit Thumper”, You will always pre-mount your gun, making sure you are looking down the rib exactly the same way every time you shoot.

    #2. You will NEVER wait so long to shoot a falling target. That tells me you are aiming at the target. You only POINT a shotgun and you only AIM a rifle.
     
  8. TW2

    TW2 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    Messages:
    18
    sounds like i should try covering it first- which occured to me after i started the thread

    i am left handed with a right dominant eye- if i premount the gun, i can't pick the target up anywhere near as quickly or comfortably than with it down a little bit, and i figure i need the practice to get a consistent mount

    the best way to describe it is that the barrel just gets in my way, and it takes me longer to find the bird than it does to mount the gun-

    i have been trying it both ways, and this seems better for me, but i plan on trying it premounted still just to make sure my observations are valid

    i also am going to try and change hands, and see what happens if i shoot right handed, which is said to be the best solution- i bat and golf right handed, so it might just work, even though i have always shot left handed (there are very few true lefties, George H.W. Bush being the only one i know of)

    i aspire to get better, and don't plan on ever becoming the second coming of annie oakley

    the book i read that makes the argument for not mounting is, if memory serves, "a history of shotgunning"- he describes the rules of international competition, where the gun must be at hip level before calling for the bird, and makes a strong argument for not premounting, covering the plusses and minuses of both


    i keep both eyes open until the very end- yes i do try and aim it sometimes, but not all the time- i am working on that

    i absolutely need to shut my right eye momentarily to have any chance at hitting the target

    anyway, thanks for all your suggestions and help- i really enjoy shooting trap, and even with my brand new mossberg 500 (pump), i managed to get two doubles the first time i ever shot skeet, about 6 weeks ago

    so i at least know it ain't hopeless
     
  9. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,060
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    If you are certain you are right eye dominant, you must close that right eye if you continue to shoot left handed. You state you are a new shooter. It would be much better if you switched over to shooting right handed. Not only that if you are shooting a Mossberg Pump; I would assume the ejection port is on the right side of the receiver. Shooting right handed places you away from the ejected shells. But if you are a "newbie"; you haven't shot a lot of rounds left handed. Try to switch over. It might feel clumsy at first but hang in there. Good Luck. Ed
     
  10. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,680
    Location:
    ohio
    here is something else to try. Many of the pro's tell you the set-up point is the usual station one left side of trap house, position 3 center of trap house and station 5 right side. I taught my wife to hold in the center of the house on 1,2 and 3. Slightly to the right on 4 and off to the right side on station 5. That way she can always see the bird exiting the house and it is not blocked by the he barrel. Try that deal. It might work for you. The gun movement is not that great and you'll still have plenty of time to get to the target. Motordoc.
     
  11. TW2

    TW2 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    Messages:
    18
    great suggestions guys

    thank you

    next time out i will try the pre-mount pointed low at the house- that should give me the clear field of vision i need to acquire the bird

    it is kind of like golf- you need to do it often enough to get the right muscle memory every time

    one those occasions where i do nail the bird, it feels very natural and automatic

    where i run into trouble is when i start thinking about it

    next time i shoot and there isn't a large crowd, i will try to shoot right handed too- but only after a couple of hours practicing my mount in the living room (i live in the suberban part of boston, and most of my neighbors just wouldn't understand)

    tom williams
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.