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Newbie 1100 CT barrel question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by smac61, Nov 29, 2009.

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  1. smac61

    smac61 TS Member

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    Nov 28, 2009
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    Hi all,

    I'm a newbie when it comes to all this so forgive me if I sound stupid. I have experience hunting upland birds and informal "throw your own" clays. Having said that, I am reading there are point of aim / point of impact considerations in a trap gun.

    I recently picked up an 1100 Classic Trap with 2 barrels and 6 chokes. Am I correct in assuming that the 30" barrel will shoot high and only pattern correctly with the singles, mid and long tubes? (when I say correctly, I mean as marked on the tube) Can I also assume the with the 26" VR barrel and standard chokes it will shoot POA and pattern like a field model? Also, what is meant when some states thier gun is shooting 60/40?

    Bottom line is I wish to use this for hunting, informal clays and perhaps venture into sporting clays and trap.

    Again, I'm new to this so bear with me...

    Thanks,
    Sean
     
  2. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,052
    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I have shot 870's and 1100's for many years. I would would use the trap chokes in the trap barrel and the field chokes in the field barrel. Why do anything different? A pattern board will tell you how they really shoot.

    The stock dimension on the classic trap will feature a higher comb height than on a field gun. That said, your eyes will be higher above the barrel with a trap dimension stock than with a field dimension stock. This of itself should make the gun shoot higher.

    The trap barrel probably has a rib that is slightly elevated to allow for a rising trap target. The field barrel probably has a rib parallel to the bore. Thus, if you are sighting with the beads, the trap barrel will shoot a little higher. As your eyes are the rear sight, it really depends on the position of your head.

    The old rule of thumb with a field gun was that you "covered up" the target and with a trap gun you held under the target so that the target never went out of sight. This was because the trap gun shot higher than a field gun.

    I began hunting with an 870 field grade 28" modified plain barrel 12 gauge and shot it well. I rolled many a rabbit out to 50 yards. That our local hardware store only carried Winchester paper Xpert field loads with #5 shot probably had something to do with this. Anyway, after a few hunts with me, two of my friends put away their 20 gauges and bought 870 12 gauge guns like mine.

    After I got into trap shooting with an 870 TA trap, I got used to the higher trap stock. For hunting, I put a 26" improved cylinder barrel on the 870 TA Trap stock and this worked just great. In the 1970's and early 1980's, choke tubes were not that common so you just bought another barrel with the desired choke.

    In your case, you have a short 26" barrel and a long 30" barrel. For rabbits and quail, I would use the shorter barrel. For doves and squirrel, I would use the longer barrel.

    Learn to shoot with both eyes open and without looking at the beads. IMO, after you have shot the gun a while and stop looking at the beads, you should be effective with either barrel.

    Ed Ward
     
  3. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Messages:
    967
    Your gun will probably shoot around a 60/40 point of impact. That is to say that 60% of your pattern will impact above your point of aim and 40% will impact below your point of aim. The height of the comb will determine to a great degree how high the gun will shoot. It might turn out, and I expect it will, that the 26 inch barrel may shoot a little bit higher than the 30 inch barrel do to the shorter barrel having to be elevated at a sharper angle to reach the correct eye alighment with the front bead. If not it should be very close to the same. The bore diameter should be within a few thousands of each other and the chokes are really interchangable. Your short yardage tube on the trap barrel should measure .700 which is .027 constriction and is improved modified. I think the next is .034 and is a full choke and the other tube is .041 and an extra full. I hope this helps.
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    15,642
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    flinch, I have an overbored barrel, and it takes standard chokes.

    These barrels have about .018 or so of choke in the barrel, before the tube. I believe they did this so no one would make a damaging mistake. Also so they would not have to tool up for an new system of chokes.

    Sometimes I shoot a skeet choke in this barrel just to fool guys. It really comes out to Mod when you mike it and add the 18 thou.

    There are chokes marked trap for this barrel, the "trap full" mikes the same as a regular Mod. There is a "trap extra full" that really inks the target.

    I would advise anyone with the overbored step rib barrel to measure everything and then do whatever suits your fancy.

    HM
     
  5. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    Flincher, he said it was a trap Classic. The Classics have a nominal bore diameter of .727 so a regular choke tube would work fine. Also HM is 100% on the money when he says back bored barrels will work with standard chokes. The back bored barrels taper back down to .727 before the choke starts and are threaded and shaped to accept the standard Remington choke tubes. You actually have .018 choke before it even reaches close to the threads so you effectively have a modified choke without even having a choke tube in the barrel.
     
  6. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    9,433
    Trap barrels are designed with a built in vertical lead(shoots high). That is because trap targets are usually a rising target and this allows you to aim at the target inorder to hit it.

    Skeet and field barrels shoot flat(50\50), half the pattern above your point of aim, and half the pattern below your point of aim.

    With all that said, you can never be sure where your gun is hitting compared to your point of aim (POI vs POA), until you shoot it at the patterning board. HMB
     
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