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Newb Troubles

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Lucenut, Jan 21, 2010.

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  1. Lucenut

    Lucenut TS Member

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    Hi, I'm a newbie trap shooter. Our gun club has a trap field, concrete house and a reliable machine. I don't know the rules really, a buddy got the key and permission to do our own "league" on tuesday mornings.

    My shooting: 20 years ago I used to duck hunt regularly and that was the extent of my shotgunning. This fall I went duck hunting a week and pheasant hunting a week. Duck hunting I was about 1 out of 10 hits. Pheasant (most shots going away) I was better than 50%.

    So I rolled up to the trap league with my Browning BPS pump with modified choke. The first 2 weeks I was one of the best there shooting 14, and 18 my first 2 rounds ever! The next week it dwindled some to 11, and 15. The next week 11 and 12, then the last two weeks I've been in the single digits (7 and 8s)

    I love being out shooting stuff on tuesday mornings but if I get any worse I might as well just shoot into the air rather than spending the $9 for pigeons.

    I think my initial shooting style was to start with the barrel on the right corner of the house and whip it out in front of the bird and stop/pull the trigger. I read some about slowing everything down yada yada yada and now I just can't hit anything!

    I've googled hoping for a simple diagram of what sight pictures should look like, but I think it would be best to have someone look over my shoulder am I right? Anyone in central Florida want to have a look at my shooting? I'll gladly travel to any club from Tampa area to Orlando either coast south to Naples or Miami for some guidance.

    Thanks in advance for any help.
     
  2. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Newb, motordoc sells a very good dvd for beginners. It is by the Remington pros. Buy one and watch it, then watch it again. It will help, it goes over all the fundamentals. Bulge.
     
  3. colonel klink

    colonel klink Active Member

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    When I went on the Police Dept. many years ago I got involved in pistol shooting & as I practiced I got worse. I talked with the range instructor & he said "with practice you will get worse." He said it is a common thing in newbies. You will improve with time. I would say get a video on trapshooting, get to a club & ask for advise (not all advise is good though). You probably are flinching or stopping your swing/follow through. I'm sure others on here that are better at this will have advice. Hang in there, it's all good. Colonel
     
  4. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    It is rather difficult to give any meaningful input as to what you need to do to improve. As you are a new shooter it should be fairly easy to correct some of your problems. (As you haven't yet developed bad habits). If you can find a good shooter at your club ask him for a little assistance. Correct shooting techniques, to include gun mount, stance etc. will definitely help. After you can consistently break 15+ targets out of 25; you then can work off of that to improve. You state that you broke 18 in one of the very first rounds you shot. This shows you that you can break a decent score. I have watched so many new shooters, (and some more experienced shooters), do the very same thing you are doing. Last year I saw a shooter, (who averages about 16) shoot his first 25 straight. The next round he shot a 10!! He does the same thing as many novice shooters do. When they are comfortable and break a number of targets they come out with a good score. However, when they miss a number of targets, they then have a tendency to "bear down"; and then choose to shoot them like they are using a rifle. They allow the bird to get way out there and aim at it and of course miss. This may be a part of your problem. Again, find a good shooter at your club and have him watch you shoot. Hope this helps. Ed
     
  5. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Bulge is right about the DVD, Trapshooting with the Remington Pros. Covers all the basics. There are also people that post here from the Silver Dollar, and Flagler gun club. Wayne
     
  6. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    Klink is right: most noobs see their scores start pretty high, then go in the tank for a period. Usually takes 500-1000 targets to get back where they started! So, you are right on schedule.....

    You are having problems because you are taking advice out of context. Find an experienced trapshooter at the club who will take you under his/her wing and help you progress. It's hard to do it alone.
     
  7. maka

    maka Member

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    Check your local library for an old VCR tape made by Brit Robinson. It is title Trap shooting with Brit Robinson. If you find it watch it and watch and watch it.
     
  8. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Subject: D. Lee Braun/Remington Shooting DVD F?S
    From: motordoctor
    Email: joe1234@ameritech.net
    Date: Thu, Jun 18, 2009 - 09:08 PM ET
    Website Address:



    This is a 33 minute DVD on singles, handicap and doubles. BRAND NEW FROM REMINGTON Price reduced to 25 dollars includes shipping to you. It has a camera mounted on the gun to show the relationship to the target for the lead. Motordoc
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    No doubt some training videos will help but what stands out in your description is that you are 'stopping the gun and shooting'. That just won't work. My analogy is to think of shooting the shotgun like you are squirting a water hose at somebody running across the backyard. You move that nozzle at the rate the person is running and you also have to lead them a ways. You naturally keep the nozzle moving and don't stop just because you are pulling the handle. The only time time you stop the swing is when the runner gives up or trips over the lawnmower and falls down.

    All this other stuff like were do you hold your feet etc. is just fluff and won't get you to hitting the target. Also don't be focused on the bead on the end of your barrel, look at the target. You don't focus on the hose nozzle when you are squirting down little Johnny do you? Same deal with the shotgun.

    Good luck.
     
  10. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I think not looking at the bead or barrel is the best advice. I have found it does not really matter much where I hold the gun as long as I focus on the target and not the other stuff.
     
  11. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    I am assuming you have a poor fitting gun and bad gun mount mechanics. Have you checked to see which is your master eye?

    Andy.
     
  12. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    It's my near meaningless opinion that a new shooter or one that is new to a venue will initially shoot fairly well (barring major physical problems) using only his/her instincts. As soon as that shooter starts to apply his thinking process the scores will suffer and it's time to seek some advice from knowledgeable competitors but then, as pointed out above, some of that input isn't all that professional either. When the shooter learns to shoot instinctively but with good gun fit, form, and assuming good physical ability, and without thinking too aggressively, he/she will begin to raise those scores and perhaps excel. Learn the basics, be sure of gun fit, and try to stare at the bird, be smooth, and let the instincts prevail.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  13. Lucenut

    Lucenut TS Member

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    What is this "Motordoc" you guys are referencing? I have googled it and found nothing about trapshooting.

    I can't find a reference to any Brit Robinson trapshooting video via google. I'll try the library though.
     
  14. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Motordoc is a contributor on this forum - that's his sign on name......Bob Dodd
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    More advise;

    Get Phil Kiner's DVD. He advertises on this site and is an excellent instructor. If you really get serious about this game, take one of his clinics, it is worth every penny. He helped my shooting tremedously.
     
  16. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    Location:
    Anderson, IN
    Hi
    I would tend to agree with Wolfram. Shooters new to the sport usually error in these ways:

    1-stopping the gun (no follow-through) through the bird. 16 yd singles don't take much lead. foot and a half on hard rights-lefts, and 6" to a foot every where else (quarter angles). Straightaways with a field gun you will need to come up on the bird til it just disappears under your bead and then pull the trigger. field guns are made to shoot flat or low.

    2-waiting too long to shoot-when the trigger is pulled, bird should be still on the way up, or peaking at the top of its arc. late shots are difficult and you handicap yourself.

    3-looking up early on the stock. Keep your head down. Looking up early to see it break is a terribly bad habit, and you don't know you're doing it sometimes til someone watches you.

    4-videos can help, but they are like fishing shows to a point. You can't catch bass while on the couch-you gotta go.

    5-gun hold on the house can get you behind. if its too low, you will be "chasing" the bird, and it will feel like you don't have much time. lift your barrel over the house so it's pointing at air 3-4 ft above the house. this will give you less movement, and less chance of error. the only time I hold low on the house is if there is a stout breeze hitting my back and pushing the birds down. Then, you can do that. Weather can sometimes dictate gun holds and your speed of breaking targets.

    6-pattern your shotgun. 35 yds, 30" circle, 3-4" dot colored in in the middle. marker a "rifle scope" cross in the circle, pace back 35 yrds, bead on the target, shoot. This will tell you where your gun is shooting. (point of impact), or POI. Some people think this a waste of time, but it can only help, and does, I think.

    7-watch good shooters shoot when you aren't signed up. Notice their timing. They never seem to be "in a hurry". They may shoot quick, but never looked rushed. Remember what you have done in the past to hit any given target. You've hit them all over the field at one time or another, so stash that in your confidence file. Good shooters have confidence in what they are doing. The good ones have quiet confidence in themselves, and on any given day, KNOW that they can beat anyone on the field that day. Loud confidence is offensive. Egos.....

    8-have fun. don't get upset and throw your hands up and say, well I tried. This is a game of timing. 90% mental, 10% do.

    9-Private message me anytime. I'll be gald to help. This is a gamethat can last a lifetime. It's all about shooting with fun people, having a good time, and smelling burnt powder. Hope these tips help!
    -all the best, -powderburn
     
  17. Lucenut

    Lucenut TS Member

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    I am 5'9" 180 and it seems like this BPS fits me. I'll take some video next tuesday and get some critique from the group. I really don't know how to check which is my master eye. I'm right handed and never had any troubles shooting with my right eye.
     
  18. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Did/do you play any baseball? If so how was your batting? Kind of a round about eye dominance question. I could't hit for crap because they made me do it right handed. I am very much a lefty but to this day throw right handed. I don't have a cross dom issue but I can understand how difficult that would make the game of trapshooting.
     
  19. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    What ever you do.. DON'T GIVE UP!! Your gun can fit you nicely but, if it is a field gun the stock will be too low for trapshooting.

    The old trapshooter's friend is probably what you need. Mole skin. A thick flannel like cloth with an adhesive backing like tape.

    There is nothing wrong with using you BPS but you need to raise the comb on your stock to make the gun shoot higher. You can build the mole skin on top of itself until you get the stock right for you. The adhesive will not harm your stock.

    If you decide to stay with trapshooting you can have a stock made for it or just continue with the mole skin. I did this for many years on my old 870tc and never did do anything to the wood. DON'T GIVE UP!
     
  20. Lucenut

    Lucenut TS Member

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    I batted pretty well in little league and high school. I don't think I had any eye troubles.

    As for the "Mole skin", I googled and found some little Dr. Scholls things you are supposed to stick on your feet? You are talking about a thick flannel cloth. How many layers of cloth would it take to noticeably raise the comb of the tock? It sounds like it would take alot. I see there are some commercial comb pads for less than $10. Are you talking about a quarter of an inch or what?
     
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