1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

New to reloading questions?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mgfi26, Dec 13, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mgfi26

    mgfi26 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    Hello everyone,

    I'm new to relaoding and have a few questions. If anyone cares to give advice please do so and thank you. I recently decied to start reloading and picked up a mec 9000. I went to the gun club to purchase supplies and got everything I needed. I planned on buying hulls while I was there instead I was given several boxes of used hulls. The hulls were picked up off the range and some are dirty, wet etc. This is what I have the questions about.

    1. - Do these need to be cleaned and how?
    2. - What types of hulls can and can't be reloaded?
    3. - I understand there are differeent size hulls. As far as the load / shot size do the hulls need to be reloaded to what is stamped on the side? I normally shoot 1oz. #8's
    4. - What to look for in a hull to be reloaded? ie. - damages, breaks etc.
    5. - How many times a hull can be reloaded? (everyone seems to have a
    different opinion on this matter)
    6. - What's everyones favorites and why?

    I know this is a lot but thanks in advance to everone.

    mgfi26
    matt
     
  2. powderburn

    powderburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Anderson, IN
    Hi there,
    OK. First:
    Anything with rust, hulls that have mud caked in them, hulls that are faded or have turned a weird color, have been stepped on and are flat, hit with a mower blade, toss 'em.
    Now.....There are two basic shpes as to the insides of the hull. You have whats called compression formed.........AA, Rem. Gun club (ribbed green), Rem. STS (smooth dark green), Rem Nitro (smooth gold color). These have a taper built into the inside of the shell that will require a AA type wad, or claybuster clone to the AA. Take a razor and cut one of these down to the brass. You'll see the plastic gets thicker and forms a sort of a "bowl" down at the base.

    Than, you have straight walled hulls........Federal Top Gun (Wal-Mart 4 box specials)-these have a rolled paper base in them. Gold Medal (dark maroon ribbed-new ones are smooth) Estate (orange), any of the Rio's, Diana's, etc-purple, blue, orange, etc are all straight walled hulls, are ok for reloading, but their quality affords them only one of two loads. Plastic is thin, and either the crimp will blow off, the business end of the shell will blow off, or the shell will buckle whan you final crimp it. These hulls require the Federal 12S3 type wad, or Claybuster clone. 12S0 is the 1 oz. version. (white)
    12S3's are pink or almost red.

    1 oz. of 8's are a great load. 16 yd practices back to 22 or 23 yds is ok for these. You don't have to load what is stamped on the outside of the shell. As long as you are staying with the loading recipes in the loading anuals, you are fine. Pretty much all these hulls nowadays have steel bases on them-even if they look like brass. So, be sure to rezize EVERYTHING foreign to your guns. I don't know how many guns you have, but all chamber tolerances are different. Resizing "outsider" hulls is a MUST. Autoloaders can be finicky sometimes and need the bases of the hulls resized for smooth operating. If you're shooting the same gun all the time, It's not as critical to resize.

    7/8 oz. is getting to be a popular load. These are very soft to shoot, mashes up 16 yd. targets, and are cheap to load. AA style hulls take the grey 7/8 wad. Give these a try. You'll be amazed. with any load, you can start with the book recipe, but in time, you can go down a powder bushing or two and get them comfortable. That is the joy of loading. The factory tends to load everything hot b/c they don't know what gun it's going into, or if the gun is dirty. The factory wants the public to believe they need a dove load that goes 1,400 fps, but it doesn't. That 1oz. of 8's load will kill a dove dead anywhere inside 35-40 yards. If you buy factory loads, look for 1145 or 2 3/4 dram loads. These are the softest factory made loads.

    Paper: for now, stay away from these, until you have been loading for a couple years. These are weather affected-humidity will affect these. They have to be dry. Period. I won't load these in high humidity conditions. These shoot best on hot summer days with no rain in the forecast. All these take a straight walled type wad-Federal 12S3 or 12S0. These will take a 6 point crimp starter. You can use an eight, but they will turn out ugly. Papers take a dash more powder-usually a 1/2 gr. to a full grain more for the pressure to be right. Papers are a joy to shoot, however, and smell so good when they come out of the gun after being shot. Usually can get about three loads out of a paper. Fed. are dark maroon, Super Targets are orange.

    Have fun, and shoot straight. PM me if you have other Q's, would be glad to help you out.
    -powderburn
     
  3. mgfi26

    mgfi26 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    Right now I have WAA12SL Wads. Are these are for tapered wall compression formed hulls?
     
  4. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,410
    Matt, there are alot small things to learn when loading. First and formost is that you will need to buy a scale to weight your powder and shot drops to be sure your drops are correct with the loading data that you are useing for your hulls. Your powder,hull,wad,and primer all have to match your reloading data. Please tell us your hulls you plan to reload and the components you plan on useing. Yes the WAA12LS wad will work with both AA's and STS hulls. Will not work on Fed. Gold Metal hulls. But we need to know the powder,primer,and hull. Then we can give you the proper data you need to follow for your load. How fast do you want your one oz. load to travel??? 1180 fps is a great load for 16 yard targets and short handicap to say 23 yards give or take. Some loaders like to speed up loads for handicap from l6 yards. We know you are loading on a Mec progressive 9000g as well. We will try to give you a starting bushing to start loading your shells with, but you will still need a scale to make sure they are correct. Give us the info and we will help you out more. Have fun but stay safe. Break-em all. JEff
    Oh Yeh, When using the 9000g. loader from Mec it is important to load all the same type of hulls. You need to adjust the machine for different types of hulls so to keep it simple, just load one type. The most common hulls to reload are the Win. AA. hulls and Rem's. STS hulls. Do yourself a favor and reload only one of these two hulls. Do not load wet hulls (let dry for a week) and life is to short to load a metal base hulls like most economy hulls, gun clubs included. Some guns do not even like the economy hulls. What type of guns are you planning to shoot these loads in. Only trying to help. You can buy Win. AA hulls on this site for like 3 cents a piece while the STS's are around 4 cents a piece. When loaded like 6 times plus apiece the cost is not worth loading free cheap hulls. Hope this helps.
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,260
    Matt, what I am going to tell you is based on many many years of trying just about everything.

    #1. You only want STS Remington or Reminton Nitro 27 or Remington gun clubs. Momentarily someone will chime in about how they can make great shell out of any hull. That might be true but why not start with the good stuff. Also the various loads are hull specific so you don't just mix and match hulls as you load them, it is necessary to set up and adjust your loader for a specific hull. You will get at least six loadings out of the Remingtons. Retire them when the crimp section starts to split.

    #2. Don't mess around with any hulls that are weathered or have been wet. Free stuff is great but usually you get what you pay for and free=zero. Best bet for building your hull cache is just bite the bullet and buy a few flats of factory loaded STS and keep you own hulls, this way you know what you have.

    #3. The wads you have will work in the STS hulls. When you buy other wads you want a design made for tapered wall hulls. Down Range has a bunch of great products and a call to Matt Wooodson will provide a lot more detail on that.

    #4. Use reloading data from the powder manufacture and follow it exactly. Hodgdon and Alliant both have great web sites with tons of data. Never use some recipie suggested by someone on this forum (or anywhere else)with out verifying it with the powder manufacture's data.

    #5. Use an accurate scale to confirm the powder and shot charges that your loader is actually dropping. Never assume the bushing charts accurately reflect what your loader delivers.

    Good luck and feel free to ask questions as you encounter problems.
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,650
    Yes.

    You can use them for Remington and Winchester hulls.
     
  7. mgfi26

    mgfi26 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    I'm currently shooting a BT-99 III. I have alliant green dot. I did pick up a manual / guide with my supplies. It seems as though I may have to buy some shells to re-use the hulls or buy some hulls as most of what has been given to me are two piece / straight wall and the one piece shells alot of the are starting to split at the crimp. I do have a very accurate (.000) scale that I use at my business that I planned on measuring with. Just sorting through the spent shells and sorting has taught me a lot. I normally just stopped at wal-mart and grabbed some federals and went to the club. After several years of shooting it's surprising how much I don't kow. Thanks for all of the great info. so far.

    Matt
     
  8. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,410
    Matt, Make sure your scale gives the weight out in grains!!! Still do not know what primers you got, but If you get Rem. hulls do try to find Rem. primers. If you get Win. AA hulls do try to get Win. primers. Your Green dot powder is normally for faster loads, but I found some one oz. loads down to 1,150 fps with Rem. primers in a STS hull. 18 grains of G.dot for 1,150 fps and 19.5 grains of G.dot for 1,200 fps. There are 437.5 grains of shot in one oz. You can grind out some of your shot bar in a Mec to give you the correct shot drop. You can buy different powder bushings to get the proper powder drop. A nice tip in Mec's bushings mostly are .06 grains different per number. So if you want a drop in between the numbers dropped go up one bushing and take some fingernail polish and give it a nice even coat all around the bushing and it will reduce it by 3/l0's of a grain. I don't like to bore out my powder bushings. According to my Mec chart you will need a 30,31,32,and 33 bushing to get started to load both drops. The 30,31 to find the 18 grain drop and the 32,and 33 to find the l9.5 drop. Different powders will require different bushings so you will start a little collection of them as you continue to reload. Go to Alliantpowder.com to find all your reloading data you need. Good Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
     
  9. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    mgfi26

    Get a scale that is intended to be used for reloading. A postal scale or even a lab scale might not be the best way to go. The other part would be to find someone that is experienced and careful as a reloader and get them to walk you through it. Mistakes in reloading can be costly and have the potential to injure people.

    Get a few books on the subject and READ them twice. A good one is the Lyman shotshell handbook.

    If the shells are real dirty, wet, or in questionable condition, DON'T use them.

    Weigh your powder drops from whatever bushing size you start with. Double check the shot drops also.

    Use ONLY published data from RELIABLE sources and use the EXACT components listed in the data. NO SUBSTITUTIONS. Look for "recipes" that don't exceed about 9500 PSI to start with. Under 9000 would be better. Much under 7000 might be too low and could lose some consistency.

    Safety is the number ONE concern. If you give us an idea of where you are located, maybe someone here would help get you started and show you the ropes. You could also ask around the club you go to. It's a lot easier (and probably safer) to get a guided tour. If you check with the NRA, they also have information on qualified reloading instructors.
     
  10. nutty1

    nutty1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    182
    hey there, lots of good info from this thread, i think that a good scale the reliant web site, and the mec web site [for bushings] are going to become your best friends soon have fun and be safe steve
     
  11. Pull Bang

    Pull Bang Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    472
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    matt

    There is a lot of advice posted here and for the most part is creditable.


    I have been reloading shot gun shells since 1982. I have also loaded rifle and pistol cartridges.


    One of the rules I follow is; ONLY GO BY PUBLISHED DATA FOR ANY RELOADING.


    The following two URLs will provide all the data you may want, check them out.



    (copy and paste to your browser)



    http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/index.aspx



    http://data.hodgdon.com/shotshell_load.asp



    Good luck


    Frank
     
  12. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,002
    +++1111, what everyone has said. There is a reason you will see hulls advertised as once fired "never hit the ground". Hulls that have been laying around might look good, but you can't believe all the junk that gets trapped in side them. Condensation, grass clippings, bugs, etc. As others have said, use published data, and use a powder scale. Good luck, Wayne
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.