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New Guy with Questions - Input Requested Please

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Abettator, Oct 27, 2009.

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  1. Abettator

    Abettator TS Member

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    Although I've shot for many years, I've only ever shot handguns in competition (e.g., IPSC, IDPA, PPC, etc.) However, a couple of weeks back, a buddy of mine finally convinced me to spend a day shooting trap and skeet with him. Needless to say that I fell in love instantly and, like any newbie, I went out and bought all the appropriate gear -- save and except for the gun. I've been doing a bunch of research and I can't make up my mind.

    So, I'm sure this will be a lively and opinionated thread, but this is my question:

    If a new guy (like me) was going to buy one, initial gun to start shooting trap and skeet (and possibly sporting clays in the future), what should I buy with a budget of @$5,000.00?

    I welcome your input -- thanks in advance.

    Todd
     
  2. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Check your email Todd! ......Bob Dodd
     
  3. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    Todd: Welcome! You will find the clay target sports rewarding and best of all you will meet some great people. I can only suggest "my opinion" on what I would do if I were to purchase that "special gun". First, I'm sure you would agree, there are differences in the guns used in trap, skeet and sporting clays? That being said; I would start out like this. Try to shoot as many of your fellow shooter's guns as possible. (You will be surprised how many will allow you to shoot their gun). Hopefully this will allow you to "narrow" your search to at least the type of action you like. Many prefer a semi-auto and many prefer the over/under. Myself, I would opt for the over/under. As you will be shooting all the disciplines I would get a trap gun with choke tubes, 30" or 32" barrels and it should have an adjustable comb. This allows you to adjust the comb when going from trap to skeet and/or sporting clays. If you find a gun that suits you and it doesn't have an adjustable comb; there are several guys on this forum that will do a great job of installing one. Last but surely not least, when you find the gun that you feel is what you are looking for; try to find a used one. Guns are like cars, they depreciate. If you feel you ever might want to change guns, (and you probably will at some point), you will not lose a lot of $$ if you bought the gun used. You have a decent budget. With $5000 you can pick up a very nice Beretta or Browning and have change left over to purchase shooting supplies and maybe even a lesson. As you are a new shooter, a clinic might really help. (You haven't picked up a bunch of bad habits yet)! ha.. Anyway I'm sure there will be a lot of advice coming your way. Weigh it all out and decide. But again, try to buy used if at all possible. There are a "ton" of nice guns out there. Good Luck.. Ed
     
  4. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Just remember that if you shoot skeet, the color of your open toe sling back heels must match your dress!

    Curt
     
  5. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    Two choices auto or over/under. I would go with the o/u with choke tubes, adjustable comb and trap model. You can flatten it out with the comb if you feel the need. I shoot all three sports with my trap gun and don't change a thing. I don't know where you live but you can go Jaquas Fine Guns web site and look at all of their guns and find something in your price range. Whether you buy from them or not you will have an idea of guns and price. Good Luck.

    Don
     
  6. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Buy a gun for $1000

    Spend $4000 on shells, practice and have fun.

    Nothing beats motivation and practice. Competition is the best practice.

    Curt
     
  7. rhymeswithorange

    rhymeswithorange Member

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    Buy a Beretta 391 for $1K (or used for less), you can shoot every game and you will have lots of money left over for shells, lessons, entry fees. Have fun and good luck.
     
  8. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Todd, I agree with exohunter, except I would opt for a Sporting Clays or Internationl Trap gun rather than an ATA trap gun. The reasons are simple. You will be shooting targets presented at all angles, so you need a gun that can shoot flat. You will be shooting in games that require a low mounted gun. That requires a sporting or Int Trap (modified field stock) stock. Adjustable combs are a good idea. You want a gun that is designed for a lot of shooting. That all but eliminates "field" guns. The better sporting guns are designed to be rebuilt, as are the do-it-all guns from Perazzi and Krieghoff.

    If you buy a Perazzi MX-8 with selectable trigger and choke tubes, or the equivalent Krieghoff K-80, you are good to go for everything. IMO, they are a giant step above the Berettas, Brownings, CGs, etc., and hold their value well. You can find good used specimens in your price range.

    BTW, when I got back into shotgun shooting I shot everything with my Beretta field gun. I moved to a Browning Superposed, the to a Beretta Gold E combo, then to a Peraxxi MX-15 and a Remington 3200, then to a Perazzi 2000 combo. That's where i am now. If I had started with a Perazzi as I was advised in the beginning, I'd have saved a lot of money along the way.
     
  9. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I love my XT browning with adj. comb. Nice durable gun in my opinion for a little over 2 grand at guns unlimited. I think dollar for dollar they are the best value.
     
  10. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    Save your money, skip the semi-autos, go straight to an O/U...try etchenguns.com, call Joel, he is the best Beretta man in the country! The 682/687 line of Berettas are hard to beat, and you can upgrade and change barrels as often as you want, one gun, all guages, any barrel length, and VERY affordable...LarryB (WELCOME..BTW, spend 2500 on a gun and 2500 on shells) This is a VERY habit forming sport!
     
  11. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I prefer a trap gun for everything. It's all in what you're used to. If you become accustomed to a higher-shooting trap gun, you have to force yourself to cover targets with a field/skeet/sporting gun. Every dove season, I start out with my trusty old Remington 1100 synthetic-stocked field gun but after a hour or so of missed and feathered birds, I go to my 1100 Tournament Trap with much better results. After that experience every year, I tell myself to buy a Jack West adjustable stock for the field gun but never do.

    Even the above poster who recommended you start with a flat-shooting sporting or International gun states he now shoots a trap gun for everything (at least, that's what I got from his post).

    Here's some common sense-based advice. Using the right tool makes any job easier. Shooting rising (trap) targets with a gun designed for them is easier than using a flat-shooting gun. If you get used to shooting the target with it slightly above your rib, that's how you'll shoot any target - rising, level or dropping. But having to cover rising trap targets can only lead to misses on days when the air currents are causing the targets' flight to flatten.

    Of course, you could buy a good trap combo - Browning or Beretta - and an extra field/skeet/sporting stock and stay within your $5,000 budget. But you still would have to deal with the different POIs of the two stocks.

    Ed
     
  12. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Todd:

    I suggest you look at your past experience with your handgun shooting. Did you spend your whole budget to start, on your handgun, or did you change your mind a few times and upgrade as you went along? The same may very well apply to what will happen with your Trap, Skeet, or Clay Bird shooting.

    You just as well have asked a committee to help pick a girlfriend or wife. What they may suggest might very well be something you don't want to live with. In the end only you can decide what works best.

    Have a great time with your new found sports.
     
  13. missemucho

    missemucho Member

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    Get involved at the place where you shot with your friend and ask people to let you shoot their guns. Trapshooters love to encourage OTHER people to buy a new gun! You need to shoot different guns to see what "feels right" to you. My advice would be to try out Browning XTs and the various Berettas. Though they feel totally different to me, it seems everyone can shoot one or the other and used ones constitute the best value for a beginner. They'll satisfy you for years and will return most of the money when you finally decide you need that "magic" gun to get the last possible bird!
    John
     
  14. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

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    Todd,
    If you enjoy trap shooting and stay with it for awile, the gun will probably turn out to be your lowest expense. Buy one good quality gun and it will last a long, long time. Shells, targets, travel, etc are ongoing expenses and never let up. Try as many really good guns as you can, buy the one you like best, and never look back because there will always be another in the future calling your name.

    Good luck, Marc
     
  15. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    There are a lot of used trap guns out there for sale. Shoot a few of them and you might get lucky and find one that breaks a lot of birds and is comfortable to shoot. HMB
     
  16. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Todd... IF you think you are going to really dedicate some time and effort into trap shooting, do your self a giant favor and re-read zzt's post above. Like Steve, I did pretty much the same thing, and made the same mistakes he did. I've bought and sold more guns than a sane man should have, and I'm finally shooting a Perazzi DB-81 Combo for everything. If you are going to be a serious competitor, which, by the sound of your handgun experience says you are, DON'T mess with anything but the best. You will be time and money ahead by far. Reliability and durability are paramount. Rebuild ability is also very important. If, on the other hand, you just want to experiment with trap shooting and are not sure where it will lead you, by all means buy a gun that won't even scratch your $5000 budget. My choice for serious comptetition would be a Perazzi, Kolar, or Kreighoff Combo. These three COMBO guns are at the very top of the chain, with most of the others not even in their league. As you are well aware, a good rule of thumb is: You get what you pay for, just as you do in handgunning. Whichever way your decide to go, have fun and welcome to one of the greatest, if not THE GREATEST sport there is... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  17. Abettator

    Abettator TS Member

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    Holy cow, gents!

    It's only been a day and I can't believe how friendly and informative you've all been -- both on the thread as well as sending me private messages. Anyway, please keep the feedback coming as I intend to listen to everyone's advice, shoulder and shoot as many guns as I can over the next several weeks, do my own research, and then make a decision.

    Thanks again, everyone.

    Todd
     
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