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New Gun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by tomc66, Dec 15, 2012.

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  1. tomc66

    tomc66 Member

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    I had been shooting a Remington 1100 and shot the gun well. For some unknown reason, I decided to purchase a new, over-under gun. Went to the club yesterday and shot the new gun. Only broke 14 birds. The club instructor had me pattern the gun. The gun was shooting flat and to the left. He had me add 4 washers to the adjustable comb and we moved the comb 1/8 " to the right. The gun now fires about 70% high and on target. Went back and shot a round of trap. Broke only 5 birds and even those were not solid hits. The instructor came out and set the machine to throw only straight. Used the number 3 position and missed the first five birds. He said I was shooting over the targets. When I lowered my aim so the target is about 1" above the sight, I got a solid hit. Hit the next 10 birds straight. The instructor felt the 1" "float" was fine. (With my Remington, I shoot at the bottom of the target). We then set the machine to throw hard right from the number 5 position. I hit 6 out of 10 but had a hard time leading the target and shooting under it.

    Is sighting 1" below the target considered O.K. or should I lower the comb? How many rounds does it usually take to adjust to a new gun?
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    That's called "floating the bird" and is what you do with a high shooting gun. It can sometimes take 2000-5000 rounds to be "comfortable" shooting a new gun especially when you have changed the POI from your last gun.
     
  3. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    Another option is to lower your POI to match your Remington's POI. FWIW. JM
     
  4. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    I have been there! it might not be just the point of impact. If there is something different in your sight picture, you may be lifting your head slightly. Peeking, I've heard it called. It would make it appear that your gun is shooting high when actual it's you. A good gun fit sometimes will take care of this. It sounds like you should have shot one of these before you bought one. Bill
     
  5. TjayE

    TjayE Member

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    Take out some of the spacers and lower you POI. You need to lower your pattern to hit the targets in the middle. Just like your Rem 1100. Tom
     
  6. chiefjon

    chiefjon Active Member

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    How does the gun feel when you pull it up. Is your face where you want it and can you make the same face to comb mount every time. I think 1000 rounds is a minimum to be comfortable with the gun. Your minds eye will learn where to break targets, as long as you mount the gun the same every time and work at concentrating on the hold that breaks targets. Straight aways from post 3 is a time tested and true way to learn the gun and develop the correct hold and lead.

    JON
     
  7. butcher

    butcher Member

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    The point of impact on the two guns could be the same but fluidness to the target of one gun verses the other might affect your shooting too.Why not adjust the comb where you shoot the target holding on bottom of the target like you did old gun?
     
  8. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    Go back to the 1100 that you shoot well,sell the over/under and buy shells with the proceeds.

    It's one thing in my opinion, to buy a new gun because you want one, and another thing to buy a new gun because you think it will make your scores better.

    My thoughts are,"Dance with the one you 'brung'."
     
  9. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    There would be an adjustment period with a new gun, even if it shot at the place as your old gun. Different swing characteristics, different trigger pull weight, possibly different LOP and grip dimensions. You are changing a lot at the same time. I would take one washer out, to lower your POI a bit, then give your brain time to figure out how to use the new tool. It will just take some time shooting targets. Mark
     
  10. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    May not be of any interest to you, but over the past 45+ years I've played around with different guns also, O&Us--SBTs--Semi-autos--etc. I keep going back to my old Rem.31 TC so maybe you're just comfortable with an 1100, NOTHING wrong with that. Like BigBadBob said dance with the one brung you. Ross Puls
     
  11. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Your quandary is a common one. You are accustomed to a gun that shoots a little flatter than your new one, so you have two choices - adjust the new gun to shoot where you expect it to or learn a new set of expectations. I would spend about two seconds deciding upon the former.

    Ed
     
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