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New Gun Break-In???????

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Martinpicker, Nov 21, 2010.

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  1. Martinpicker

    Martinpicker Active Member

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    I need some advise on breaking in a new trap gun. I recently purchased a new Winchester Select Energy Trap which I like very much. But...it is very stiff to open. I have lubricated it with RemOil several times, but after putting 1000 rounds or so through it, it is still quite tight to open and close. What can I do to accelerate the break-in period without risking damage to the gun?
    Thanks for your input. Jack Farrow
     
  2. Mike Battista

    Mike Battista Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Don't do anything to it unless you are a qualified gunsmith. It will take at least 3000 rounds before the action will loosen up. The under barrel lug pushes against the slot in the fore arm iron. The fore arm iron pushes against the curved front of the receiver. Until you have worn a few thousands of an inch in there your gun will feel tight. Let it wear naturally.
    Mike Battista
     
  3. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    Don't mistake breaking in a gun with loosening one up. After 1000 rounds yours should be "broken in". When you lube a light coat of a good quality oil or grease (your choice) on the pivot surfaces plus a light swipe on either side where the frame and block touch is all thats needed.

    --- Chip King ---
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    TinMan88- A grease film can only be as thick as the void between the two parts. The grease molecules will slide across each other. I cannot understand how this would make the two moving parts tighter.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Get some Clenzoil and use it sparingly, no more problem ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  6. Twinbirds

    Twinbirds TS Member

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    ship it to me! I send it back when it is broke in properly!
     
  7. daddiooo

    daddiooo TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Anytime I purchase a NEW gun I always take it home, lubricate the moving parts with a light grease and have my wife open and close it at least 100 times while I sit on the couch, watch TV, drink beer and monitor her closely to make sure it's being handled correctly.

    This seems to work every time. However, make sure there is no ammo within her reach.


    Shoot well,

    Dave
     
  8. Twinbirds

    Twinbirds TS Member

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    seriously new guns are supposed to be tight,it is one of the joys of a new gun,keep it lubed with a quality light grease and clean! dirt is an abrasive and will cause excess wear. Treat it like you normally do when you shoot. Shoot it often and shoot it well! good luck
     
  9. shrek

    shrek Active Member

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    My experience with new hinge guns had been to use grease on the bearing surfaces rather than oil.

    Seems the oil does not stay in place good enough to last very long...
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    TinMan88- If oil, grease or even water is forced between two tightly fitting surfaces, the excess fluid will be forced out and the fluid remaining between the parts will all be the same thickness. Neither water, oil or grease can be compressed.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    Have the gun looked at by a qualified 'smith. Those guns have a nasty tendency to crack forearms because of being too tight.

    ss
     
  12. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    A little off topic, but I am on Pat's side here. TM, you can not compress liquid, therefore the lubricant will move to the side, fill the void or simple squish out of the joint. The lubricant will not add thickness to the moving parts in this situation. The OP can use bearing grease, for all that matters, and it will not change the mechanics or tolerances of the action.

    On the same note of what you are saying if you have a very loose gun it could be tightened up with heavy bearing grease? I am sorry that just doesn't make sense.

    Bryan
     
  13. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
  14. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    Jack, There is a adjustment screw in the forend iron that puts tension against the the barrel lug. If you remove the wood from the iron you can adjust the screw which will make your gun open easier.
     
  15. EuroJoe

    EuroJoe TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    They don't break-in, they just wear out
     
  16. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    TinMan88- I think I can test your hypothesis. I have some flat 3/8 stainless steel strips 1 inch wide and a square vice. I am thinking about putting a light oil between two pieces and a heavier grease between two other pieces. Next, I plan to put both pairs in the square vice and squeeze them with quite a bit of force and measure the thickness of the pairs. If your position is correct, the pairs with grease between them should be thicker than the pair with light oil between them.

    Let me know what you think of this possible test. It is now 5:30 AM and I have a busy day. I will be late this afternoon before I can attempt this measurement.

    Pat Ireland
     
  17. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Pat

    I think he is speaking in terms of viscosity (wrt thickness of the oil/grease) and not the measured dimension of the gap between the parts.

    I think...
     
  18. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    I use grease (STOS) on a new gun and then oil (Pro Shot Zero Friction) after it has been broken in.

    Here is my Real World test: I bought my wife a 20ga. Beretta 686 Onyx Pro. It was used, but had very few rounds through it and was real tight. The first 2 times she shot 25 birds with it I used oil and she was flat wore out. She is a little gal, and opening and closing it 25 times was all she could do. The next time out I greased it up, and there was a world of difference in the ease of opening and closing. She shot 50 birds no problem. Next time out I figure it has broken in and just used the oil, it was tighter than a bank vault.

    She won't shoot it without the grease.
     
  19. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Other than an ill fit on metal surfaces, it takes much longer to break in the shooter than the gun? :)

    Hap
     
  20. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Tinman, Bearing grease, or any grease, is not thick to keep metal parts apart from each other. It is thick to keep the grease in place.

    That circular device the back of a semi truck I believe is called a 5th wheel. It doesn't matter the application. Take what ever lubrication you want place it between two pieces of metal and if you measure the volume of any lubricant you will find it to be the same.

    Just as Pat offered his test here is another one. Take a piston rod end cap of a small block Chevy. Put 10w-30 on the surface along with a plastic gauge and torque it to 35 ft/lbs. Disassemble and measure the plastic gauge. Now take that same rod end cap and put bearing grease with a plastic gauge and torque it at the same value. From what you have been saying in this thread the measurement of the plastic gauge will be different. Correct?

    Bryan
     
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