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New Clays Storage Shed - need advice

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Porcupine, Sep 22, 2010.

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  1. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    My Club will be building a new clays storage shed (16x20) and we'll be doing most of the work ourselves. But one question that we're not sure about is, should we pour a cement/concrete floor, or would two layers of 3/4-inch plywood be sufficient? We plan on using a pallet jack, so might that be rough on a plywood floor? Thanks for any help.

    LA in MA
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    A cost effective alternative would be to buy a sea can or two. These containers are made for pallet storage and can be easily secured. One modification we made on our sea cans was to install barrel vents on the roof to keep the internal temp reasonable in the hot months.

    If you still intend to build your own then by all means pour a 6" concrete floor above the surrounding grade.
     
  3. claybuster60

    claybuster60 TS Member

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    Porcupine:
    My best advice is to pour a concrete floor to better handle the pallet jack. To protect your clays store them on pallets off the concrete floor. If you store them directly on the cloor the cardboard boxes will draw moisture through the concrete.

    Billy P
     
  4. BAD 303

    BAD 303 Active Member

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    You will be very dissapopinted with a wood floor about five years from now. Termites and the heavy use will destroy it very quickly. Poor concrete and don't look back.
     
  5. JPettengill

    JPettengill TS Member

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    We bought a used semi-trailer in 1980 for about $1,400.00 delivered. It could use a bit of work, but it's still water tight and air in the tires. We bought another about 4 years ago from an outfit that rents them to contractors for job site storage, about the same price as I recall. They work well and are about the same height as the delivery trucks from the suppliers.
    Jim
     
  6. hrosik123

    hrosik123 Member

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    Concrete is the way to go. 6" thick should be no problem. Buster is right about making sure the boxes stay dry. Crickets love to eat wet cardboard. Good luck Chuck Hrosik
     
  7. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Ditto the retired, enclosed truck trailer. Easy to secure, built to last in the worst of conditions....breakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
  8. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    You could also buy a old shipping container they don't move well but are right on the ground so you don't have to walk up steps to get in and out of it like a trailer needs. But the trailer could be good if you get alot of standing water around the area you want it at. If you build, YES do pour concrete. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  9. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Oh, the truck trailer idea assumes you would remove the axle(s) and running gear and just set the box down on railroad ties or similar. A slight ramp to the door is all that would be needed. We even took one of those boxes, opened up the front wall, secured the doors open, and placed it over a small creek for a covered bridge on our Sporting Clays course......Bob Dodd
     
  10. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    Thanks, everyone, for the advice. A friend told me there's a flooring material called 'LVL' that, he says, could handle a pallet jack. Comments? Thanks.

    LA in MA
     
  11. j2jake

    j2jake Well-Known Member

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    There is no better floor than concrete, spend your funds wisely and ONCE. Pour. We use a retired semi tralier for target storage. We put 23 pallets in a 40 footer, Two pallets have to be hand stacked but an entire load can be off loaded from the delivery truck in less than an hour by two guys with a bridge and pallet jack. Jake
     
  12. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    A shoot I attended this past Sunday at the Sandhill Club.

    A shipping container put to good use.

    Not only used for storing targets, but also used on the 5-stand. The club put in a attic ladder to access the upper building they added (two single stack Winchester machines).

    They also had a desk and numerous electrical outlets on a panel in the container.


    joepotosky_2008_03036.jpg
     
  13. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Joe, I shot at a club down here and for the longest time they used a container along the end field at far left and place a shed like yours on top of the container and used it for the high house on the skeet/trap field and stored targets in it as well. They do work well. Break-em all. Jeff
     
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