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New Action Spring improved 1100 reliabiltiy?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by mrskeet410, Jan 30, 2008.

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  1. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    In the thread "Auto loaders and fast/slow powders" I thought I saw a post that stated the poster found that after he replaced the Main Action Spring in his 1100, its reliabilty improved. He thought this occured because because it retarded the bolt movement and allowed sufficient barrel/bubble pressure to build over the gas ports.

    I can't find that post now, and I didn't want to hijack that post, but I seemed to have a similar experience.

    In my only use of Hodgdon Clays Powder I started getting weak ejections, stove-pipes, and malfunctions. This particular 1100 was due for its 10,000 round Main Spring replacement, but I put it off thinking a new, and stronger, spring would only make things worse.

    I finally replaced the spring, and reliability improved. I thought that odd at the time. I didn't think much more about it since soon after I had my 'gas bubble' discussion with Hodgdon and switched to International Clays; and a bit later became a disciple of BreakFree CLP.

    Those other changes obscure the picture a bit, but I was always curious about the new spring improvng reliability. Can it be that a new and stronger mainspring would increase reliability?
     
  2. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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  3. CharlesR1100

    CharlesR1100 TS Member

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    Nope. New spring would have more resistance to bolt opening. Would make the problem worse. Unless the old spring had more resistance than the new, which I doubt.
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Yes a new main spring can improve the gun functioning. A complex equation is involved and the spring is only one element. The ammo, the size of the gas ports, the foot lbs of energy needed to compress the main spring all effect the timing of the autos action. HMB
     
  5. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    The new action spring is going to provide more resistance upon compression.
    It will also provide FASTER closing and chambering - assuming your loads have the correct pressures OVER THE GAS PORTS.

    I have found that when replacing an action spring, I need to fire about 200 to 300 rds to break it in. I use 3-dr equiv loads for this purpose.

    Win AAs of recent vintage in 2-3/4 dr eq, have a clean burning, soft cycling tendency to short cycle. 3-dr eqs seem to work fine.

    Recent Remington Premier STS and Federal Gold Medal 2-3/4 dr eq seem to cycle fine.

    My reloads cycle fine. (they are about "2-7/8ths" dr eq. using all Remington components and about 17.7 to 17.8 grs of Red Dot.

    Never had a cycling issue with my reloads in over 20 yrs. and that is not an overstatement.

    Conversely, I have found that once my 1100 trap gun's action spring gets its "set" - heavy field loads will cycle so harshly, that my bolt will close on an empty chamber after firing a heavy field load as the second shot from the magazine.

    I used to hunt pheasants with a 3-dr eq or Nitro 27 factory 7-1/2 as the first shot and my back up shot was a #6 3-3/4 dr 1-1/4 oz heavy field "express" load
    (2-3/4 inch only) the heavy shell would cycle, feed, fire, eject, and then wham - bolt slam home on an empty chamber and not lock back.

    I've since discovered that for pheasant and turkey - nothing beats a factory trap handicap load with 7-1/2 shot! The shot is harder and rounder and patterns tighter than ANY of the overpriced bulls#@t dollar per shot field loads and pheasants fall out of the sky like bricks after being hit with Nitro 27 trap loads w/7-1/2 shot. So I now use my reloads, or a 3-dr 7-1/2 factory & a Nitro 27 for a back up shot. Much more effective than any of the crappy flat spotted "pea" shaped shot used in "expensive" hunting loads - and the gun cycles 100% reliably for both shots and kicks softly and doesn't beat up the mechanism.

    Turkey? In CT we can use 4,5,6 & 7-1/2 lead shot on turkey. Because you are shooting at a head the size of a thumb and neck about the diameter of a garden hose waddling down a path at a distance of 20 to 35 yards - what better load to use than HARD ROUND 7-1/2s that pattern like hell in trap from a trap gun?
    (I put dull tape around the 1100 bbl and I'm all set!)

    Slugs for deer, buckshot for two legged home invaders and steel for waterfowl - I pull out the 870 and be done with it!
     
  6. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Yes, a new recoil (mainspring) spring can make a definite difference in the functioning and reliability of an autoloader.
     
  7. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    you also need to make sure that you have a steel follower ahead of the spring. The early guns had an aluminum one that galled and would drag on the inside of the tube. Also lubricate the tube and make sure it is clean and smooth before reassembly. motordoc
     
  8. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    Quick note, My brother has a 1100 magnum model. Would have cycling issues in cold weather. Installed a mew spring and follower from Surecycle. super fine emrycloth and a dowel to clean up tube real well. Fixed.....I do think if he cleaned the mag tube as good as when he installed it might have fixed also. The tube in my browning gold had so much anti rust compond on it....thick rusty non lubricating crud...it had some cycling issues until I cleaned it really good. A few calls to browning to get this info.
     
  9. ribihalee

    ribihalee TS Member

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    Replaced my spring and it helped with the stove pipes with clays powder and overall reliability. I went back to 700x powder (but that is another story). But I agree with Motordoc to replace the aluminum cap if you have that on your spring and CLEAN the tube. I use a dry lube and it seems to work well.

    M R Ducks, How do I get in touch with Sure Cycle? Thanks in advance.

    Lee
     
  10. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    According to Remington, the best way to avoid damaging the receiver by causing the magazine or action tube to separate from it is to keep a fresh action
    spring in the gun.

    The best way to cause damage is to use a fatigued or altered action spring.

    As a factory trained Remington Gunsmith and Armorer, I must remind folks that Remington knows more about their guns than anyone.

    Action springs are CHEAP.
     
  11. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    actually this information also hold true for the beretta auto loaders also. motordoc
     
  12. setter

    setter Member

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    ribihalee,

    You asked about Sure Cycle.
     
  13. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Dear Motordoc

    I am also a Beretta Armorer, and you are right. Any auto shotgun used on clay targets or hunted heavily should be serviced annually (at least) and have the action spring replaced.
     
  14. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    I always lube mainsprings with general purpose moly grease. The grease reduces the friction between the spring and the guide tube. It also quiets and dampens. Just buy a cartridge for a grease gun at the parts store. Works on 1100's, 390's, 391, etc.

    The best way to determine when to replace a mainspring is to measure the over all length and compare it to a new spring. When the spring has taken a 1 inch set it is time to replace it.

    Action springs are cheap compared to receiver damage.

    Jim Skeel
     
  15. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    The power of the main spring should be matched to the power of the ammo being used in the weapon. HMB
     
  16. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Dear HMB

    The only problem with what you posted is that any gun is going to have different ammo, including reloads and factory fodder run through it. The spring must be attuned to the most powerful ammo that will be run through it. In the Remington, which locks open after every shot, and is unlocked by the round from the magazine, bolt speed and timing is cardinal to proper functioning.

    You cannot say that you will NEVER hand your gun to a new shooter, or best friend, and they will slip a factory round in it. That factory round might be a Super Cap load, or a 3 dram standard trap load, or your favorite home brewed.

    Best keep fresh, factory springs in autos. If the Remmie pukes a mag or action spring tube, it costs more to fix the gun than you will EVER get back out of it. The offending tube must be silver soldered, and the receiver then reblued. Cost? Generally $150 +.

    I generally keep an auto around for a loaner for new shooters. I do not care for them, personally, even in the field. Compared to the fixed breech trap gun, they are all maintenence and parts hogs! YMMV
     
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