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Needing .410 ideas

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by davidjayuden, Nov 3, 2010.

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  1. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    I'm wanting to set up a .410 for trap practice. And I want to stay in the $1000 range give or take a few hundred, so no London-made Live Pigeon grade guns. I'm considering making a stock for a pump gun to fit it to me, maybe starting with a Browning pump. Any other obvious choices that I should consider, and is there any value to practicing with a .410?
     
  2. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    The most cost effective means is to buy a Briley sub-gauge for your break open gun. This way you still get the fit of your normal gun.

    You can accomplish nearly the same thing just by reloading some 3/4oz 12ga shells. This can be done using a couple of the newer, fast burning, powders very easily.

    ss
     
  3. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    David; I have a Browning M42 copy with an aftermarket monte carlo trap stock. Its fun to shoot but only has a 25" barrel. So light its hard to control on hard right or left angles. Its really set up for my wife who is 5' tall. Not being burdened by details she has run 15-16 straight at singles. Reloading the .410 hull is a real pain. I would do as Shortshucker suggests if the gun is for yourself.
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    One thing the Browning BPS has going for it that other pumps don't is that it comes from the factory with choke tubes.

    Pity the Rem 870 Wingmaster doesn't have choke tubes. Since their 1100 .410 does, I've been waiting for Rem to add them to the 870. Alas, they never have.
     
  5. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    So what makes reloading the .410 difficult?
     
  6. hunter44

    hunter44 Well-Known Member

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    Reloading the 410 is more difficult for me because the shot will bridge in the drop tube from time to time & release when the handle hits on the up stroke......hell of a mess!

    I looked into getting a 28 gauge tube from Briley for my trap gun to use for practice.......$295 for one tube. Sure cheaper than getting another gun & the practice would be with your regular trap gun.

    My experience with all the gauges leaves me believing that the 410 is a whole different deal than the others.......not something that I would practice with because I don't believe it would accomplish much......

    I decided that just loading some 3/4 or 7/8 oz. 12 ga. loads at low speeds would be just as cost effective & probably better practice.

    Good Luck with whatever you decide to try!
     
  7. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    A 3/4 oz 12 gauge shell.. is vastly more effective than a 3/4oz 410 shell..I would get 1 full length 410 tube for a 12 gauge SBT gun.. and have at it..

    The only thing about a 410 that makes it harder to reload is first shot bridging as stated above..which can be much advoided if you cut a longer angle inside the tube and micro polish.. and the crimps are a bit more finiky.. Other than that.. no big deal..
     
  8. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    All that Hunter44 says plus the facts that .410 hulls are hard to come by. They are a high pressure shell and therefore the case life is very short in comparison to quality 20 and 12 ga. hulls. Crimps don't hold up very long either. Due to limited hull capacity you cannot change powders as easy either. If you enjoy reloading then I would go for it. A perfectly reloaded .410 shell is something to be proud of!
     
  9. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Well-Known Member

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    Another thing I like about the Browning BPS 410 is that the stock dimensions are the same as the bigger bore BPS's. Plus you have a 410 for hunting or whatever else you would want one for.
     
  10. ke4yyd

    ke4yyd Member

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    Bass Pro has 410 Savage Milano made by F.A.I.R. on close out now for $859. I bought one to shoot sporting clays. It has a 28 inch barrell with fixed chokes imp cyl and mod. However mine patterns full and extra full. It also has a 70/30 pattern. I have shot it well at sporting clays and skeet but yet to try it on trap. I only use 2-1/2 in hulls for reloading so limited to 1/2 oz of shot. I have no problems reloading these shell. The shot bridging mentioned earlier does not occur with me using #9 shot, the only practical size shot in this light load. The recoil in the 410 with 1/2 oz of shot even in a 6 lb gun is much less than 3/4 oz in the 12 gauge. I have shot quite a bit of both loads and say the 3/4 oz load is more effective.

    http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=229673
     
  11. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    410 hulls are expensive and hard to reload.

    Short Shucker gave good advice. If you want a lighter gun/second gun/lower shot load or whatever go with a 20 ga.

    If you want "good" practice, screw in the full choke and only count powdered birds as hits. Drop down to 3/4 or 7/8 oz if it is still too easy for you.

    I find no need to make trap anymore challenging. I do shoot a few rounds with a 28 ga for fun and to tune up for bird hunting but I will never match my 12 ga scores. Using a pull trigger costs me about 3 birds per round.

    Don Verna
     
  12. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your wisdom.
    dju
     
  13. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    There was a guy in Kerrville shooting a old Ithaca..SBT.. He worked for the factory.. He shot 1/2oz 12 gauge very effectively.. using Bullseye powder.. plastic wad with filler.. and #9 shot.. If anyone knows him.. try to get the data.. It was impressive..to say the least..
     
  14. 333t

    333t Member

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    I got into shooting .410 trap a few months ago and ended up with an O/U SKB and a WesternField 550E pump with a 26" FC barrel. Of the two, I shoot the 550E (actually a Mossberg) the best. You should be able to find a good used one for around $250-300. They are a full sized gun and you will want the vent rib for trap. Its a good reasonable way to start with the .410 and shouldn't need any stock work or adjustments. Full choke is perfect for trap, and I wouldn't be concerned with choke tubes. Lots of fun.

    Phil
     
  15. mag410

    mag410 Active Member

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    I have a 27" Remington 1100 RemChoke .410 bore barrel for sale. Comes with an extended modified choke. $225 including UPS Ground shipping.

    Michael
     
  16. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

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    I happen to have a Briley Companion 32" tube in 28 ga. for the BT99, and ever now and then I shoot a round or two of trap with it from the 16.

    I break just about as many targets with it as I do with my one oz trap load of 8s.

    I use 8s in the 28 when shooting trap....actually I think 8s are a little better for skeet also.
     
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