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Need help with Remington LT20

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by k1200ltc509, Apr 23, 2008.

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  1. k1200ltc509

    k1200ltc509 Member

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    Tom I would say first go out and shoot a flat or two of shells out of it to see if it will break-in. Most of the Lt-20s that I have run across are shot only a few times, and aren't broken in.
    I have opened up the ports on every 1100 I owned, and that was per a Remington LE armorer. But be very careful, too much and too much gas gets into system=battering the receiver, and timing issues. Hand twist a drill bit into the ports and start with a SMALL bit. Can't put any back ya know! But I would bet that if you put a couple flats thru it at the skeet range it would wear in nicely. Rick Gibbs
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of similar problems with short barrel 12 guage 1100s and the solution is to enlarge the gas port(s). I recently picked up an LT20 1100 and it runs perfectly with 7/8 oz 2 1/2 dram target loads. This gun has a 28" tube on it though.

    You didn't say if the gun worked with heavy 1 OZ loads. If it does then you can rule out things like the gas seal or action binding and move on to enlarging the gas port slightly. If you are planning on opening the choke up to better suit quail shooting distances then do this before you open up the gas port.
     
  3. Bob_K

    Bob_K Well-Known Member

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    The length of the barrel has no effect on the gas system since the gas ports are located in exactly the same place regardless of barrel length. If your LT 20 is in such pristine shape, it may well just require a little more break in as suggested.
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Really Bob? You might want to verify that. I have a few 1100's and can tell you that the factory does use larger porting on barrels less than 26". Gas delivery to the operating mechanism only occurs in the time between when the wad passes the port and when it exits the barrel. With a 21" tube that time (hence volume) would be less than 1/2 what it is with a 28" tube. To compensate, a larger port is required to get a workable gas volume.

    What exactly do you think needs to break in anyway? It's not like these are extremely close tolerance machines.
     
  5. bayrat

    bayrat TS Member

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    I have one of these and have never had a problem with it. On my 1100 12ga it will sometime just BARELY dribble out a spent hull. Darn thing will almost hit you on the foot! When that happens I just take a drill bit THAT IS SLIGHTLY UNDERSIZED of the gas ports and WITH MY FINGERS ONLY twist the bit back and forth in the ports to remove the fouling in there. That has worked every time for me. I have NEVER enlarged these ports, just cleaned them out.

    And, as mentioned by M R DUCKS above, be sure the o-ring is in good shape and in place on the magazine tube.

    Try these things before you get too radical with it.

    Erol Tucker - The Bayrat
    POC, TX
     
  6. k1200ltc509

    k1200ltc509 Member

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    Break-in is required in just about any firearm. Most experts in the police field reccomend 500 rds before carrying any firearm for serious social purposes, including the Glock pistol which is probably the MI=Garand of pistols.
    There are burrs, ruough edges, how ever you want to describe them as a result of any machining porcess. And Remington hasn't been very good in final fitting for probably the last 30 years. Gone are the days of the early TB's and 3200's, just too expensive to make. At a Remington armorers course for 870 and 1100 shotguns the instructor said to "modify" 1100's in this manner after that break-in period if a problem occurred.
    My Kolar wouldn't open up without a sustantial break-in period, and the finish on it is probably better then what Remington puts into final finish in a whole year on 1100's. My experience, use it as you wish, Rick Gibbs
     
  7. Robb

    Robb Member

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    I have been looking for a LT20. Must be extra nice.
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Get a pin vise and work the hard carbon out of the gas ports by hand with number drills. when you are sure all the carbon is out, the drill bit should have a few flakes of steel on it when pulled out.

    God forbid you should break a bit off in the hole. Once was enough for me.

    As above, be sure the chamber is clean and no other mechanicals are binding.

    then if the problem persists, open up one number drill size at a time till it works. Use nice new bits so you don't get a burr in the barrel. Polish with fine emery where the bit came through. finish with fine steel wool wrapped around a cleaning brush and a little low sulphur cutting oil.

    HM
     
  9. thewolf

    thewolf TS Member

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    I opened up mine. Use the most expensive drill bits you can find. Preferably from some German sounding company you have never heard of. Try to get long ones, its a weird angle. If the bit breaks, throw the barrel away. If unwilling to throw away. The broken bit can be hammered out with a good punch or an EDM machine.
     
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