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Need help to fix a scratch in gun stock??

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bluedotman, Oct 16, 2009.

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  1. Bluedotman

    Bluedotman Active Member

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    I have a small scratch in a gun stcck about 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch deep.how is the best way to repair what kind of wood filler is best to use.
     
  2. Bluedotman

    Bluedotman Active Member

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  3. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    Do you have a polyurethane or oil finish?

    ss
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    1/8 of an inch deep is not a scratch, it is a gouge. The stock can be refinished and the solo of the filler matched reasonably well ( I used a combination of filler, sawdust from the stock and stain). If you do not want to refinish the stock, there are several colored fillers that can be wiped into the gouge. The color can be matched, the filler will remain in place for a few weeks and must be reapplied. Application is quick and simple.

    Or, you could wipe some stain into the gouge and just go back to breaking targets. In a few months the gouge will not look as bad to you as it now does.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    We have repaired scratches (and a gouge or two) in glossy catalyzed finishes with crystal clear 2-part epoxy from a hardware store. The epoxy is added little by little into the flaw until it is just even with the stock surface and then allowed to harden wile the stock is supported in a position where the surface of the repair is parallel with the ground (epoxy flows as its sets).

    If needed, the wood in the scratch can be colored with water-based or alcohol-based stain before using the resin.

    Carol Lister
     
  6. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    I have a gun with what turned out to be a spray on finish that began coming off in 1/4 to 1/2 inch chips. I removed the loose material and used True Oil to stabilize the area and fill in the missing finish. I have used the gun in the field for several years and the repair remains intact. I defy anyone to detect the repair.

    However, if the gouge goes into the wood, a repair of appropriate filler and stain must be applied before the True Oil finish. Done carefully and with patience it will be undetectable.
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Carol- I am impressed. I have tried the method you described and could never make it work. I was able to almost fill the gouge to the right height and to fill the gouge with too much so it ran over the sides but, I couldn't get it just right. Too little and too much was easy, just right was beyond me.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    If you mask off the area with paper tape..fill..then wet sand till flush.. it works perfectly
     
  9. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    Pat,

    Slightly underfill the repair. Epoxy resin expands slightly as it cures so repairs that are just short of level will usually be level when hardened.

    I've also wet sanded a few repairs that I overfilled. I start with 1000 then 1200 then 1500 paper followed by a rub Flitz metal polish or Autosol chrome polish (which, by the way, is great for polishing headlight lens covers that have gone cloudy). I want to try some Meguier's Swirl Remover next time.

    Carol Lister
     
  10. samiam03

    samiam03 Member

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    I seem to remember using a steam iron and a towel to raise compressed wood. This method doesn't work on a gouge with the wood missing.

    Sam
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Carol- Yes, we have done the same thing, but with different results. I have sanded down the epoxy to try to get it as exactly the right level, but I sanded too much and got a light area around the edge of the repair. Then I tried to stain the light area, but that didn't work out to my satisfaction. Then I had to refinish the butt stock. To make the butt stock match the forend, I had to refinish that also. Then to make the job come out right, I had to rechecker both pieces of wood. With the wood bare, it is so easy to install a new recoil pad, I also did that. I am sure you can clearly understand my problems with wood repair.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    Oh, I understand your situation quite well, Pat.

    Carol Lister
     
  13. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I think Pat's experience is typical and that is where Bluedotman is headed. Most guys making these type of "invisible" repairs are blind.
     
  14. Michael Gregory

    Michael Gregory Member

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    Bluedotman (and others), seriously, try this! Go to the link above, if I managed to do this right, and but a Behlen "burn-in kit". I have taken some pretty good size nicks and gouges out of stocks with one of these kits, and they work really well for this, without seriously messing with the finish around it. Read the directions and I think you will find that it has a fairly short learning curve. Short story: I had been learning this business from my Father for about 6 months, when one day I had a brand new Perazzi stock from Wendell Schroll slip out of the vice (rather quickly), hit the air compressor below, then bounce and roll across the floor about 5 feet. A few minutes later, when I could speak again, I got my father, who called Wendell and had him send a replacement (0nly $200.00 at the time). Well, I had been looking for an excuse to buy one of these kits and try it, so I did. To my surprise, after a couple of hours of "playing with it" you could hardly see the marks, so much so that two years later, we almost sold that stock to someone as a brand new stock (yes, I did catch it in time, and it was sold at a discount, with the buyer's knowledge of it's history) These kits are perfect for exactly what you described. If you want, call me and I will give you some pointers if I can! Mike (760)788-8888
     
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