1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Need Dog Advice for Upland Hunting

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by UpNorthMN, Oct 29, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. UpNorthMN

    UpNorthMN Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Messages:
    698
    Location:
    MN
    I am looking for another dog to join our family. I hunt Pheasant and Grouse in Minnesota and Dakotas.

    So far I'm considering English Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels and French Brittany Spaniels. I want a dog with an exceptional nose that is relatively easy to train. Already have an Lab.

    The dog will live inside with the home and join me at the office as well. Lots of kids in our house so I need a dog friendly to friends.

    Thanks in advance for the advice!

    David
     
  2. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,734
    Are you leaning towards a flusher or pointer? In your choices above you list both.

    It appears your leaning towards a smaller breed by your choices also. As such and considering the breed choices you state, the springer. I love their enthusiasim.

    THe exceptional nose will be inpart due to your research. As always stated, view the parents and spend some time with the owner and feel him/her out. When picking one of the three above choices, make sure its hunting stock your viewing and not ring workers. Training will also be based on parents as there can be hard heads in all breeds but with a Britt or Springer and can be simplified. I know nothing of the cocker breed other than the few I've seen in the field or been around I would rather not have been. But they are cute..

    Good luck in finding your new buddy :)
     
  3. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,375
    I vote for the English Springer. I ran field trials for 30 years and trained many dogs. The Springer tends to be the easiest dog to train as they want to please you. Also, once a springer is trained they stay trained. Find a group of field trial people who have working dogs and ask them for recommendations of litters soon to be born or already on the ground. Cost should be around $350 to $500. You can train with them and learn alot. DO NOT JUST GET A SPRINGER THEY ARE ALL NOT CREATED EQUAL. Springers have split into almost two breeds: working or show. The show people will claim that their dogs also work = NOT. The show people will show you their ribbons from a Jr. Hunt Test... this is the most basic work and does not indicate a good working dog. So find a puppy out of field trial lines or parents with a Master Hunt test certificate. Good luck. If you want more information send me a personal/private message. Fred
     
  4. Dano

    Dano TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15
    UpNorthMn,

    I have been huntin birds in South Dakota for almost 50 years now....I have hunted behind most any breed of dog you can ask for....But, I have hunted behind my Brittany now for over 10 years and I will say this, pointing dogs and upland birds are a beautiful thing to watch and be part of.

    My Brit will point more birds than my cousins labs kick up....and a Brit starting to lock up on point is a wonderful thing....If you chose a Brit, find a breeder that has barrel chested Mom's and Dad's.. My pup is 48 lbs, barrel chested and can hunt all day without slowing down....

    As for the other 9 months out of the year, a smaller 40-50 lb dog is easier to have in the house than a bigger pup, they are great buddies...Mine goes to work everyday with me, and at nite is in the garage, the kitchen or where ever else I may happen to be...I don't think you will have any regrets with a Brittany...

    Good luck on your your search...Dano
     
  5. Wolfman

    Wolfman Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Chcago
    Can't say I have teh hunting experience others here do, but my 2 Britts are the finest dogs I've ever hunted!
     
  6. UpNorthMN

    UpNorthMN Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Messages:
    698
    Location:
    MN
    Any advice to breeders in the Midwest would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks again.

    David
     
  7. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,035
    Weimaraner.
     
  8. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,760
    Seems there was a very long thread about this subject just a few days ago.
     
  9. msmith

    msmith Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    538
    Location:
    North tonawanda, NY
    Hello,
    I have 2 English cockers. I feel they are the best family/hunting dog. They are great with kids (I have 3) and will hunt their heart out for you. They are easy to train (I could not teach Lassie how to bark) and have great noses. My dog weight is 32lbs and my wifes spoiled dog (too many scooby snacks) weights 39lbs. Both are males. A geat web sight for English cockers is www. fieldcockers.com. Mike
     
  10. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,781
    I think your early choices are all good, and agree with Fred, about staying with hunting lines.

    That said, ask for references and call them. Dogs sold 3-4yrs ago are particularly good.


    Bob
     
  11. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    592
    IMO

    Pheasant = flushing dog

    Grouse = pointing dog

    Probably going to be a little tough to have it both ways.

    "exceptional nose that is relatively easy to train" You're not going to know that about the individual dog until you've dropped a bunch of money on it and it's a member of the family.

    ~Michael
     
  12. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,226
    Location:
    Mesquite, Nevada
    The old original types of Gordon Setters have larger scent glands in their nostrils than other kinds of bird dogs. According to what I was told by a Stanford U. Vet professor. The one I had could wind birds or coveys at quite a ways out and was a great bird pointer for hunting on foot! Tuffy was an real good bird dog with many quail and pheasant to his finding/pointing abilities!
    [​IMG]


    Hunting on foot in brush or in the mountains and hills here in AZ, I wanted a close working dog and not one I'd have to call in from the wild blue yonder! You wind up spending more time looking for the dog than hunting birds! I choose my current foot hunting model on good advice from a great friend, Tom Strunk. Foot size follows.
    [​IMG]


    Gidget has lived in the house since the day I brought her home and she's making one of the finest foot hunters dogs a man could ask for! At 6-7 months old, she was holding her own when hunted with older more experienced bird dogs of various kinds! Sometimes it was tough for the older dogs to honor a pups point on a covey of wild birds but some did many times!! On singles also!
    [​IMG]


    I only wish I'd have known of the French Brittany's abilities when I was young enough to climb the mountains and hills we now hunt together! I'd never even heard of them till my friend told me about their bird hunting prowess!! I'd have another one but I don't want to start world war 3 on the home front! I refuse to keep my dogs in an outside kennel.

    Hap
     
  13. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,049
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    Double your pleasure double your fun get another Lab
     
  14. Kevin Nelson

    Kevin Nelson Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    213
    I have owned two american brittanys which were exellent dogs and now I have a french brittany, what a dog, a day doesnt go by that he doesnt impress me. Excellent house dog, never had to house break him, it seems like he was born broke. It seems like whatever mood I am in, he matches it, if I am excited,he is too, if he knows I am not in a good mood, he will just lay around. As far as hunting abilities go, they having a never ending suppliy of energy, they are a close to medium ranging dog, it depends on what the cover dictates. I hunt a lot of the same place over the year and I swear he remembers where the birds come from and checks out each one of those places, its like he has them stored in his memory bank. There is a place in South Dakota called Plum Creek Kennels that raises, hunts and trains the French Brittany, you might give them a call, I believe his name is Bill Dillon.
     
  15. 257 ackley

    257 ackley Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    If you want a real bird dog, that will also be a good house dog purchase a female German Shorthair. You will not be disappointed.

    Shawn
     
  16. acss

    acss Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5,983
    Location:
    rock port, mo
    my dad always said- have 3 good friends- 1 w/ a boat 1w/ a garden tiller and 1 w/ a good bird dog !!!!!!!!!!!!!! he also said - dogs are like kids- the more time you spend with them - the better they will be and start developing those good habits when they are young!!!
     
  17. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,781
    I think your early choices are all good, and agree with Fred, about staying with hunting lines.

    That said, ask for references and call them. Dogs sold 3-4yrs ago are particularly good.


    Bob
     
  18. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    592
    IMO

    Pheasant = flushing dog

    Grouse = pointing dog

    Probably going to be a little tough to have it both ways.

    "exceptional nose that is relatively easy to train" You're not going to know that about the individual dog until you've dropped a bunch of money on it and it's a member of the family.

    ~Michael
     
  19. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,226
    Location:
    Mesquite, Nevada
    The old original types of Gordon Setters have larger scent glands in their nostrils than other kinds of bird dogs. According to what I was told by a Stanford U. Vet professor. The one I had could wind birds or coveys at quite a ways out and was a great bird pointer for hunting on foot! Tuffy was an real good bird dog with many quail and pheasant to his finding/pointing abilities!
    [​IMG]


    Hunting on foot in brush or in the mountains and hills here in AZ, I wanted a close working dog and not one I'd have to call in from the wild blue yonder! You wind up spending more time looking for the dog than hunting birds! I choose my current foot hunting model on good advice from a great friend, Tom Strunk. Foot size follows.
    [​IMG]


    Gidget has lived in the house since the day I brought her home and she's making one of the finest foot hunters dogs a man could ask for! At 6-7 months old, she was holding her own when hunted with older more experienced bird dogs of various kinds! Sometimes it was tough for the older dogs to honor a pups point on a covey of wild birds but some did many times!! On singles also!
    [​IMG]


    I only wish I'd have known of the French Brittany's abilities when I was young enough to climb the mountains and hills we now hunt together! I'd never even heard of them till my friend told me about their bird hunting prowess!! I'd have another one but I don't want to start world war 3 on the home front! I refuse to keep my dogs in an outside kennel.

    Hap
     
  20. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,049
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    Double your pleasure double your fun get another Lab
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.