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Need 40-82 Data

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by BrowningGal, Jun 28, 2009.

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  1. BrowningGal

    BrowningGal TS Member

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    I need some assistance. We've looked through all our new and old reloading books, and we cannot find any data for the 40-82. If anybody has a book that contains 40-82 reloading data, I would be eternally gratefully to receive a scan of that page via email or snail mail.

    PM or email me if you can help. Thanks!
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Google 40 82 cartridge, lots of loads listed. HMB
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Sure. Use blackpowder.<br>
    <br>
    Fill the case up to the base of the seated bullet and its wads with FFg blackpowder. Do not leave an air gap. Use a magnum primer to ensure ignition. Blackpowder is usually measured by volume, not weight. It works well with scoops, but these should be metal, not plastic. Static electricity and blackpowder are not friends. You can certainly measure by weight, though, but work out the volume requirements first.<br>
    <br>
    The wads are made from file folder material, and there are two of them. In between the wads is a wax wad. This is made by pressing the case mouth into a sheet of smooth beeswax. This wad helps keep the fouling soft.<br>
    <br>
    It is optional to use a wad made from newspaper over the flash hole. Sometimes the flash hole can get blackpowder granules stuck in it, and for precision long range shooting this can increase standard deviation. For hunting and general shooting it is usually not needed.<br>
    <br>
    The bullet should be made from soft alloy, as close to soft lead as possible. No gas check is needed with blackpowder, because the shock of the blackowder going off will obturate the bullet. Meaning it causes the bullet to increase its diameter. With one exception (4759) no smokeless powder will cause obturation.<br>
    <br>
    The lubrication grooves in the bullet should be filled with a very soft mixture of vasoline and beeswax. It is optional to add lanolin, and some add graphite, though the latter makes a real mess, since I hand fill the lube grooves. The better bullet designs have very large lube grooves. The bullets with small grooves are better for smokeless powder.<br>
    <br>
    I don't use a heavy crimp. The bullet cannot be pushed back into the case because the entire case volume is filled up to the base of the bullet. A moderate crimp works well.<br>
    <br>
    The reason the case gets filled 100% with blackpowder to the base of the bullet is because an air gap can cause a secondary explosion effect, and this can bulge or ring the chamber.<br>
    <br>
    Spent cases are, as soon as possible, deprimed, then washed in hot soapy water, using a bore brush to clean the inside of the case. The cases are rinsed several times, then set somewhere warm to dry. I do not resize the brass unless it is being used in multiple rifles. All that needs to be done is to slightly bell the mouth. Cases last a lot longer when they are not resized, and some of these obsolete cases can fetch $5 each.<br>
    <br>
    The bore is cleaned with hot soapy water or with blackpowder bore cleaner. Do not use Hoppes or solvent based cleaners. You're going to make a big mess, so point the muzzle into a plastic bucket. For lever guns, like top opening Winchesters, I work from the muzzle with the action upside down, allowing the waste water to flow out without getting into the action parts. This is better done with the butt on a bench top and the muzzle slightly raised, with a small pan under the action. Once the bore is clean, I lube it lightly with oil. The bore should be cleaned as soon as possible after shooting, and all efforts should be made to do it the same day. Cleaning a breech loading blackpowder rifle is pretty easy. I can get them clean much faster than a bore that's had smokeless powder and jacketed bullets shot in it.<br>
    <br>
    BTW, blackpowder will form hard crusty deposits ahead of the chamber. If you blow moist breath into the chamber, it will help keep the fouling soft. If you've seen the movie Quiggley Down Under you've seen Tom Selleck do this after he shoots. For hunting this isn't needed, but on the range where a lot of shots may be fired, it really helps. Some blackpowder target shooters even solder a brass tube to the primer hole, and attach a plastic tube to it to blow through. But they're shooting 100 or more rounds at an event.<br>
    <br>
    And another thing... Original cartridges often had the case volume in their name. Like the 40-82. It's a .40 caliber bullet with 82 grains of blackpowder. The cases you'll use today will never accept that much blackpowder. This is because the original cases were of balloon head design, and today's cases have a solid head. This makes the cases stronger, but it also reduces the volume. I have not loaded the 40-82, but I have loaded 45-70 and 45-90 (the latter was necked down to become the 40-82). Usually the 45-70 can only accept 62 grains of blackpowder at the most. I'd guess the 40-82 would probably accept somewhere in the neighborhood of only 75 grains of blackpowder, more or less.<br>
    <br>
    As for the bullet, the original 40-82's used a 260 grain bullet, and the bore twist would not stabilize anything heavier (and hence longer). If you are shooting this through an old Winchester, keep this in mind. If you have a modern barrel, then check the twist rate and use the Greenhill Formula to determine the longest bullet the bore will accept.<br>
    <br>
    The 40-82 with a 260 grain bullet was popular at one time for big game, even with the 260 grain bullet. It's not a long range cartridge, as it runs out of killing energy at longer ranges. But it had a reputation for being a reliable killer out to 200 yards. Most old cartridges had more of a rainbow trajectory, and the bullet really fell off after 150 yards. The 40-82 was considered a "flat shooter" in its day. And it was popular even for elk, though today I'd want something a bit more heavy duty.<br>
    <br>
    If you have an older rifle, made before 1900, I'd recommend not shooting jacketed bullets in it. The barrel metal is considered "soft", and jacketed bullets can accelerate bore wear.<br>
    <br>
    The two most popular rifles chambered for the 40-82 were the Winchester 1885 Single Shot and the Winchester 1886 lever action, and particularly the latter.
     
  4. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

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    In "Shooting Lever Guns of the Old West" Mike Venturino loads the .40-82 with 25 grains of Accurate XMP5744 under a custom 280 gr. cast bullet, or a 260 gr jacketed bullet from DKT. Loads were 1394 fps with 31 fps variation with the cast bullet, 1349 and 54 with the jacketed bullet. Loads with BP and the cast bullet were in the 1450 to 1470 fps range.

    He say to slug the bore before shooting cast bullets, as guns run between .406" and .409" and you will need to size cast bullets accordingly. He also mentions that the rifling grooves in a lot of 1886s is shallow and when loaded with black powder the first two shots will be together, but the group will open up to 4" to 5" over 5 shots @ 100 yards.

    Good luck,

    ~Michael
     
  5. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Another option is to load a correctly sized bullet over a case full of Accurate 8700 with an over powder wad.

    This EXTREMELY slow powder will provide approximately black powder speeds, with smokeless clean up. Use Fed 215 primers.
     
  6. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    As stated, be careful of bullet size. My Marlin 1895 has a .413 bore, but a .409 chamber!!
     
  7. rocktire

    rocktire Member

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    Funny to read this thread. I just rebuilt an 1886 winchester in .40-82 for a friend of mine to give his dad for fathers day. I told him we need to get some brass and reload some to shoot. After fathers day he comes to me with about 50 pieces of original winchester brass. Boy they used to make them thin back then. Very neat, I plan to load some dummy rounds to display with the rifle and get new brass for the ones to shoot. Looking foward to trying it out.

    The rifle was boughten from an old man who's basement flooded. He wanted to get rid of the rifle. The water had been up to the loading gate on the rifle and left to rust. I spent hours disassembling and cleaning parts to keep the rifle as original as possible. Get this he also got two 1873 winchesters .25-20 and .38-40. As well as a model 61, 62, and 63 in the same condition. Sure was a shame they were rusted up and the wood blackened. Has been a great project for me though.
     
  8. Michael Jobe

    Michael Jobe TS Member

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    1873s weren't chambered in .25-20 (Winchester 1892s and Marlin 1894s were though). Possible you're thinking .32-20? Too bad classic old leverguns got damaged like that.

    ~Michael
     
  9. rocktire

    rocktire Member

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    Thanks for the correction not sure what I was think to be honest. It is indeed a .32-20.
     
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